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Encyclopedia > Censure
Distinguish from slover, censer and censor.

Censure is a process by which a formal reprimand is issued to an individual by an authoritative body. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... A censer is a vessel for burning incense. ... For omission and secrecy, see censorship. ... A reprimand is a police prosecution within the United Kingdom that is given to people 17 years and under who break the law and get arrested for the first time. ...

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Censure in the United States

Censure is a procedure for publicly reprimanding a public official for inappropriate behavior. When the President is censured, it serves merely as a condemnation and has no direct effect on the validity of presidency, nor are there any other particular legal consequences. Unlike impeachment, censure has no basis in the Constitution, or in the rules of the Senate and House of Representatives. It derives from the formal condemnation of either congressional body of their own members. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


To date, Andrew Jackson is the only sitting President to be successfully censured, and his censure was subsequently expunged from the record.[1] For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


On December 2, 1954, Senator Joseph McCarthy (Republican-Wisconsin) was censured by the United States Senate for failing to cooperate with the subcommittee that was investigating him, and for insults to the committee that was trying to censure him. is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Joseph McCarthy, see Joseph McCarthy (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to...


On June 10, 1980, Representative Charles H. Wilson (Democrat-California) was censured by the House of Representatives for "financial misconduct," as a result of the "Koreagate" scandal of 1976. "Koreagate" was an American political scandal involving South Koreans seeking influence with members of Congress. An immediate goal seems to have been reversing President Richard Nixon's decision to withdraw troops from South Korea. It involved the KCIA (now National Intelligence Service (South Korea)) funnelling bribes and favors through Korean businessman Tongsun Park in an attempt to gain favor and influence. Some 115 members of Congress were implicated. is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Charles Herbert Wilson (February 15, 1917-July 21, 1984) was a California congressman from the Los Angeles area. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Koreagate was an American political scandal in 1976 involving South Koreans seeking influence with members of Congress. ... For Korea as a whole, see Korea. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


On July 20, 1983, Representatives Dan Crane (Republican-Illinois) and Gerry E. Studds (Democrat-Massachusetts) were censured by the House of Representatives for their involvement in the 1983 Congressional page sex scandal.[2] is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Daniel Bever Slammin Dan Crane (born January 10, 1936) is an American politician. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Melissa L. Bean - Website - Illinois 8th Judy Biggert - Website - Illinois 13th Jerry Costello - Website - Illinois 12th Danny K. Davis - Website - Illinois 7th Rahm Emanuel - Website - Illinois 5th Lane Evans - Website - Illinois 17th Luis Gutierrez - Website - Illinois 4th Denny Hastert - Website - Illinois 14th Henry Hyde - Website - Illinois 6th Jesse L. Jackson... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... These are incomplete tables of congressional delegations from Massachusetts to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The 1983 Congressional page sex scandal was a political scandal in the United States involving members of the United States House of Representatives. ...


On July 31, 2007, Retired Army General Philip Kensinger was censured by The US Army. The censure came after misleading investigators of the Pat Tillman death in 2004. [3] Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Patrick Daniel Tillman (November 6, 1976 – April 22, 2004) was an American football player who left his professional sports career and enlisted in the United States Army in May 2002, along with his brother Kevin Tillman. ...


Censure in Canada

Censure is a procedure by which the Canadian House of Commons or the Senate can rebuke the actions or conduct of an individual. The power to censure is not directly mentioned in the constitutional texts of Canada but is derived from the powers bestowed upon both Chambers through section 17 of the Constitution Act, 1867. A motion of censure can be introduced by any Member of Parliament or Senator and passed by a simple majority for censure to be deemed to have been delivered. In addition, if the censure is related to the privileges of the Chamber, the individual in question could be summoned to the bar of the House or Senate (or, in the case of a sitting member, to that member's place in the chamber) to be censured, and could also face other sanctions from the house, including imprisonment. Normally, censure is exclusively an on-the-record rebukeā€”it is not equivalent to a motion of non-confidence, and a prime minister can continue in office even if censured. However, previous Prime Ministers have accepted motions of censure as questions of confidence and resigned. The interior of the House of Commons chamber, also called the Green Chamber The House of Commons (in French, la Chambre des communes) is the directly elected lower house of the Parliament of Canada which sits in the nations capital of Ottawa, Ontario. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... ...


References

  • (See the wikinews article.)
  1. ^ U.S. Senate: Art & History Home > Historical Minutes > 1801-1850 > Senate Censures President. Retrieved on 2006-04-01.
  2. ^ http://www.house.gov/ethics/Historical_Chart_Final_Version.htm
  3. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070731/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/tillman_friendly_fire

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Look up Censure in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Senate: Reference Home > Virtual Reference Desk > Censure (155 words)
Less severe than expulsion, a censure (sometimes referred to as condemnation or denouncement) does not remove a senator from office.
In 1834, the Senate censured President Andrew Jackson – the first and only time the Senate censured a president.
Senate Censured in Lobbyist Case, November 4, 1829
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ecclesiastical Censures (4602 words)
censure, nor is it a vindictive punishment; in fact, it is not a punishment at all, properly speaking, but rather a canonical impediment, an inability to support the honour of the sacred ministry, which forbids the reception of orders, and the exercise of those received.
Censures a jure (by the law) are those inflicted by a permanent edict of the lawgiver, i.e., which the law itself attaches to a crime.
Censures, being essentially a deprivation of the use of spiritual goods or benefits, are to be inflicted medicinally, and should therefore be lifted as soon as the delinquent recedes from his contumacy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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