FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Celestial mechanics

Celestial mechanics is a division of astronomy dealing with the motions and gravitational effects of celestial objects. The field applies principles of physics, historically Newtonian mechanics, to astronomical objects such as stars and planets. It is distinguished from astrodynamics, which is the study of the creation of artificial satellite orbits. Astrometry: the study of the position of objects in the sky and their changes of position. ... In physics, motion means a change in the position of a body with respect to time, as measured by a particular observer in a particular frame of reference. ... Gravitation is the tendency of massive objects to accelerate towards each other. ... ... Since antiquity, people have tried to understand the behavior of matter: why unsupported objects drop to the ground, why different materials have different properties, and so forth. ... The original version of the physical discipline of mechanics, due to Sir Isaac Newton, who developed the theory over a period from about 1664, until the publication of his great work, known as the Principia, in 1687. ... The Pleiades star cluster A star is a massive body of plasma in outer space that is currently producing or has produced energy through nuclear fusion. ... We are forever reading in our newspapers that our planets are made up of rock. ... Astrodynamics is the study of the motion of rockets, missiles, and space vehicles, as determined from Sir Isaac Newtons laws of motion and his law of universal gravitation. ... ...

Contents


History of celestial mechanics

Although modern analytic celestial mechanics starts 400 years ago with Isaac Newton, prior studies addressing the problem of planetary positions are known going back perhaps 3,000 years. Sir Isaac Newton at 46 in Godfrey Knellers 1689 portrait Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (25 December 1642 (OS) – 20 March 1727 (OS) / 4 January 1643 (NS) – 31 March 1727 (NS) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, and alchemist. ...


Ancient Civilizations

The Ancient Babylonians had no mechanistic theories regarding celestial motions, but recognized repeating patterns in the motion of the sun, moon, and planets. They used tabulated positions during similar past celestial alignments to accurately predict future planetary motions. Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ...


Imperial Chinese astrologers also observed and tabulated positions of planets and guest stars which can refer to either a comet or a nova. Although their records are a very useful historical source for modern astronomy, there is no known record of them having predicted celestial motions. Chinese Astrology (占星術 pinyin: zhàn xÄ«ng shù; 星學 pinyin: xÄ«ngxúe ; 七政四餘 pinyin: qÄ« zhèng sì yú; and 果老星宗 pinyin: gÇ”o lÇŽo xÄ«ng zōng) is related to the Chinese calendar, particularly its 12-year cycle of animals (aka Chinese Zodiac), and the fortune-telling aspects according... Photo of the comet Hale-Bopp above a tree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The Classical Greek writers speculated widely regarding celestial motions, and presented many mechanisms for the motions of the planets. Their ideas all involved uniform circular motion, and were centered on the earth. None of these proposals seem to have been tested against actual observations. Classical (or early) Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ...


Claudius Ptolemy

Claudius Ptolemy was a Greek astronomer and astrologer in early Imperial Roman times who wrote a book on astronomy now called the Almagest. The Almagest was the most influential secular book of classical antiquity. Ptolemy selected the best of the astronomical principles of his Greek predecesors, especially Hipparchus, and appears to have combined them either directly or indirectly with tabulations from the Babylonians. Although Ptolemy relied mainly on the work of Hipparchus, he introduced at least one idea, the equant, which appears to be his own, and which greatly improved the accuracy of the predicted positions of the planets. His model solar system fails to correctly predict the apparent sizes of moon, but otherwise is accurate to within the naked-eye observations available to him. This article is about the geographer and astronomer Ptolemy. ... Roman or Romans has several meanings, primarily related to the Roman citizens, but also applicable to typography, math, and several geographic locations. ... Almagest is Latin form of the Arabic name (al-kitabu-l-mijisti, i. ... Almagest is Latin form of the Arabic name (al-kitabu-l-mijisti, i. ... This article is about the geographer and astronomer Ptolemy. ... For the Athenian tyrant, see Hipparchus (son of Pisistratus). ... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... This article is about the geographer and astronomer Ptolemy. ... For the Athenian tyrant, see Hipparchus (son of Pisistratus). ...


Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler was the first to develop the modern laws of planetary orbits, which he did by carefully analyzing the planetary observations made by Tycho Brahe. Johannes Kepler was the first to successfully model planetary orbits to a high degree of accuracy. Years before Isaac Newton had even developed his law of gravitation, Kepler had developed his three laws of planetary motion from empirical observation. Johannes Kepler Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630), a key figure in the scientific revolution, was a brilliant German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. ... Johannes Keplers primary contributions to astronomy/astrophysics were his three laws of planetary motion. ... We are forever reading in our newspapers that our planets are made up of rock. ... Tycho Brahe (December 14, 1546, Knudstrup, Denmark – October 24, 1601, Prague, Bohemia (now Czech Republic)) was a Danish nobleman characterized by a prosthetic nose of copper, well known as an astronomer/astrologer (the two were not then distinct) and alchemist. ... Sir Isaac Newton at 46 in Godfrey Knellers 1689 portrait Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (25 December 1642 (OS) – 20 March 1727 (OS) / 4 January 1643 (NS) – 31 March 1727 (NS) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, and alchemist. ...


See Kepler's laws of planetary motion and the Keplerian problem for a detailed treatment of how his laws of planetary motion can be used. Johannes Keplers primary contributions to astronomy/astrophysics were his three laws of planetary motion. ... To compute the position of a satellite at a given time using Keplers laws of planetary motion (the Keplerian problem) is a difficult problem. ...


Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton is credited with introducing the idea that the motion of objects in the heavens, such as planets, the Sun, and the Moon, and the motion of objects on the ground, like cannon balls and falling apples, could be described by the same set of physical laws. In this sense he unified celestial and terrestrial dynamics. Sir Isaac Newton at 46 in Godfrey Knellers 1689 portrait Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (25 December 1642 (OS) – 20 March 1727 (OS) / 4 January 1643 (NS) – 31 March 1727 (NS) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, and alchemist. ... We are forever reading in our newspapers that our planets are made up of rock. ... The Sun is the star at the centre of our Solar system. ... Crust composition Oxygen 43% Silicon 21% Aluminium 10% Calcium 9% Iron 9% Magnesium 5% Titanium 2% Nickel 0. ... A small cast-iron cannon on a carriage A cannon is any large tubular firearm designed to fire a heavy projectile over a considerable distance. ... A physical law or a law of nature is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations. ...


Using Newton's law of gravitation, proving Kepler's Laws for the case of a circular orbit is simple. Elliptical orbits involve more complex calculations. Using Lagrangian mechanics it is possible to develop a single polar coordinate equation that can be used to describe any orbit, even those that are parabolic and hyperbolic. This is useful for calculating the behaviour of planets and comets and such. More recently, it has also become useful to calculate spacecraft trajectories. Lagrangian mechanics is a re-formulation of classical mechanics introduced by Joseph Louis Lagrange in 1788. ... Photo of the comet Hale-Bopp above a tree. ... Ariane 5 lifts off with the Rosetta space probe on March 2, 2004. ... A trajectory is an imagined trace of positions followed by an object moving through space. ...


Albert Einstein

After Einstein explained the anomalous precession of Mercury's perihelion, astronomers recognized that Newtonian mechanics did not provide the highest accuracy. Today, we have binary pulsars whose orbits not only require the use of General Relativity for their explanation, but whose evolution proves the existence of gravitational radiation, a discovery that led to a Nobel prize. The original version of the physical discipline of mechanics, due to Sir Isaac Newton, who developed the theory over a period from about 1664, until the publication of his great work, known as the Principia, in 1687. ... Two-dimensional visualization of space-time distortion. ... In physics, a gravitational wave consists of energy transmitted in the form of a wave through the gravitational field of space-time. ...


Open problems

There are a few open problems in celestial mechanics that await solutions. The solution of the n-body problem remains unsolved for 3 or more bodies. The theory of quantum mechanics has not been merged with the theory of general relativity to produce a so-called "theory of everything". Even though Einstein's theory predicts gravitational waves, this radiation has not been directly observed. This article needs cleanup. ... The n-body problem is the problem of finding, given the initial positions, masses, and velocities of n bodies, their subsequent motions as determined by classical mechanics, i. ... DO HWA MECHANICS[chang rhinn`theorem] ... Two-dimensional visualization of space-time distortion. ... A theory of everything (TOE) is a theory of theoretical physics and mathematics that fully explains and links together all known physical phenomena. ... In physics, gravitational radiation is energy that is transmitted through waves in the gravitational field of space-time, according to Albert Einsteins theory of general relativity: The Einstein field equations imply that any accelerated mass radiates energy this way, in the same way as the Maxwell equations that any...


Examples of problems

Celestial motion without additional forces such as thrust of a rocket, is governed by gravitational acceleration of masses due to other masses. A simplification is the n-body problem, where we assume n spherically symmetric masses, and integration of the accelerations reduces to summation. Thrust is a reaction force described quantitatively by Newtons Second and Third Law. ... A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. ... The n-body problem is the problem of finding, given the initial positions, masses, and velocities of n bodies, their subsequent motions as determined by classical mechanics, i. ...


Examples:

  • 4-body problem: spaceflight to Mars (for parts of the flight the influence of one or two bodies is very small, so that there we have a 2- or 3-body problem; see also the patched conic approximation)
  • 3-body problem:

In the case that n=2 (two-body problem), the situation is much simpler than for larger n. Various explicit formulas apply, where in the more general case typically only numerical solutions are possible. It is a useful simplification that is often approximately valid. Astrodynamics is the study of the motion of rockets, missiles, and space vehicles, as determined from Sir Isaac Newtons laws of motion and his law of universal gravitation. ... Diagram of generic quasi-satellite orbit A quasi-satellite is an object similar to a planet or satellite of the Sun, however its orbit encompasses its planet and the planets star. ... The Lagrangian points (IPA: ; also Lagrange point, L-point, or libration point), are the five positions in space where a small object can be stationary with respect to two larger objects (such as a satellite with respect to the Earth and Moon). ... In mechanics, the two-body problem is a special case of the n-body problem that admits a closed form solution. ...


Examples:

A further simplification is based on "standard assumptions in astrodynamics", which include that one body, the orbiting body, is much smaller than the other, the central body. This is also often approximately valid. A binary star system consists of two stars both orbiting around their barycenter. ... The position of Alpha Centauri Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri) is the brightest star system (a triple star system) in the southern constellation of Centaurus, and contains the fourth brightest star in the sky, with a total visual magnitude of −0. ... The term double planet has several accepted usages. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 0. ... Charon (shair-un or kair-un, Greek Χάρων) is the only known satellite of Pluto. ... The term binary asteroid refers to a system in which two asteroids orbit their common centre of gravity, in analogy with binary stars. ... 90 Antiope (an-tye-a-pee) is an asteroid discovered on October 1, 1866 by Robert Luther. ... For most of the problems in astrodynamics involving two bodies and standard assumptions are usually the following: A1: and are the only objects in the universe and thus influence of other objects is disregarded, A2: The orbiting body () is far smaller than central body (), i. ... In astrodynamics, an orbiting body () is a body that orbits central body (). Under standard assumptions in astrodynamics: it is orders of magnitude lighter than central body (i. ... In astrodynamics a central body () is a body that is being orbited by orbiting body(). Under standard assumptions in astrodynamics: it is orders of magnitude heavier than orbiting body (i. ...


Examples:

  • Solar system orbiting the center of the Milky Way
  • a planet orbiting the Sun
  • a moon orbiting a planet
  • a spacecraft orbiting Earth, a moon, or a planet (in the latter cases the approximation only applies after arrival at that orbit)

Either instead of, or on top of the previous simplification, we may assume circular orbits, making distance and orbital speeds, and potential and kinetic energies constant in time. Notable examples where the eccentricity is high and hence this does not apply are: Presentation of the solar system (not to scale) The solar system is the retinue of objects gravitationally bound to our Sun. ... A NASA artists conception of what the Milky Way would look like if seen off-axis. ... In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics a circular orbit is an elliptic orbit with the eccentricity equal to 0. ... The orbital speed of a body, generally a planet, a natural satellite, an artificial satellite, or a multiple star, is the speed at which it orbits around the barycenter of a system, usually around a more massive body. ... In astrodynamics, under standard assumptions any orbit must be of conic section shape. ...

Of course, in each example, to obtain more accuracy a less simplified version of the problem can be considered. Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 0. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure trace Potassium 31. ... In astronautics and aerospace engineering, the Hohmann transfer orbit is an orbital maneuver that moves a spacecraft from one orbit to another using a fairly low delta-v. ... Gemini 11 (officially Gemini XI) was a 1966 manned spaceflight in NASAs Gemini program. ... A sub-orbital spaceflight (or sub-orbital flight) is a spaceflight that does not involve putting a vehicle into orbit. ...


Perturbation theory

Perturbation theory comprises mathematical methods that are used to find an approximate solution to a problem which cannot be solved exactly, by starting from the exact solution of a related problem This article describes perturbation theory as a general mathematical method. ...


Related topics

  • Astrometry is a part of astronomy and deals with the positions of stars and other celestial bodies, their distances and movements.
  • Astrodynamics is the study and creation of orbits, especially those of artificial satellites.
  • Orbit is the path that an object makes, around another object, whilst under the influence of a source of centripetal force, such as gravity.
  • Satellite is an object that orbits another object (known as its primary). The term is often used to describe an artificial satellite (as opposed to natural satellites, or moons). The common noun moon (not capitalized) is used to mean any natural satellite of the other planets.
  • Celestial navigation is a position fixing technique that was the first system devised to help sailors locate themselves on a featureless ocean.

Astrometry is a part of astronomy and deals with the positions of stars and other celestial bodies, their distances and movements. ... Astrodynamics is the study of the motion of rockets, missiles, and space vehicles, as determined from Sir Isaac Newtons laws of motion and his law of universal gravitation. ... In physics, an orbit is the path that an object makes, around another object, whilst under the influence of a source of centripetal force, such as gravity. ... A satellite is an object that orbits another object (known as its primary). ... Moons of solar system scaled to Earths Moon The common noun moon (not capitalized) is used to mean any natural satellite of the other planets. ... Celestial navigation, also known as astronavigation, is a position fixing technique that was the first system devised to help sailors locate themselves on a featureless ocean. ...

External link

Research

  • Marshall Hampton's research page: Central configurations in the n-body problem

Artwork

  • Celestial Mechanics is a Planetarium Artwork created by D. S. Hessels and G. Dunne

  Results from FactBites:
 
Quantum Mechanics of The Reciprocity of Light and Gravity (490 words)
For quantum mechanics is everywhere in celestial motion, and quantum motion is everywhere in celestial mechanics.
Celestial mechanics of planetary bodies may initially appear to be distinct from the minute level of quantum mechanics of the atom.
Yet, the celestial mechanics, or celestial motion is but a distinct level of quantum mechanics, the motion of the atom and its internal workings.
mechanics: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2171 words)
The term mechanics generally refers to the motion of large objects, whereas the study of motion at the level of the atom or smaller is the domain of quantum mechanics.
Mechanics (Greek Μηχανική) is the branch of physics concerned with the behaviour of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements, and the subsequent effect of the bodies on their environment.
Mechanics encompasses the movement of all matter in the universe under the four fundamental interactions (or forces): gravity, the strong and weak interactions, and the electromagnetic interaction.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m