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Encyclopedia > Celestial Kingdom

The Celestial Kingdom refers to a division of heaven and was coined by the controversial Swedish theologian Emanuel Swedenborg in his 1758 book entitled Heaven and Hell. In Mormonism, it is the highest of three kingdoms of heaven, where God dwells. Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the most-recognized architectural symbol of Mormonism Mormonism is a religion, movement, ideology, and subculture that originated in the early 1800s as a product of the Latter Day Saint movement led principally by Joseph Smith... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...

Contents

Emanuel Swedenborg

Celestial Kingdom has historically referred to a division of heaven and was coined by the controversial Swedish theologian Emanuel Swedenborg in his 1758 book entitled Heaven and Hell. Based on a vision he said he had, Swedenborg believed in an infinite variety of heavens, classified into two "kingdoms", three "heavens", and innumerable "societies". The two "kingdoms" he called the celestial kingdom and the spiritual kingdom. The three "heavens" he called "celestial", "spiritual", and "natural". The celestial kingdom, according to Swedenborg, was "the Lord's priestly kingdom", inhabited by "higher angels", described as follows: Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

The angels in the Lord's celestial kingdom, from their more interior reception of the Divine of the Lord, far excel in wisdom and glory the angels that are in His spiritual kingdom; for they are in love to the Lord, and consequently are nearer and more closely conjoined to Him. Heaven and Hell 4:25.

Within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

The Plan of Salvation, as illustrated by some within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (not doctrinal)
The Plan of Salvation, as illustrated by some within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (not doctrinal)

In Mormonism, the Celestial Kingdom is the highest of what are believed to be three heavens or heavenly kingdoms, or degrees of glory. It is thought to be the "third heaven" referred to in 2 Corinthians 12:2 of the Bible, and it is also thought to correspond to the "celestial bodies" mentioned in 1 Corinthians 15:40 (King James Version). The Latin word celestial means "heavenly". Image File history File links PlanofSalvationedit. ... Image File history File links PlanofSalvationedit. ... In Mormonism, the Plan of Salvation is the plan which Heavenly Father created, to save, redeem, and exalt his children (all of mankind are included in his children). ... This is the current Mormon collaboration of the month! Please help improve it to meet the ideal article standard. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the most-recognized architectural symbol of Mormonism Mormonism is a religion, movement, ideology, and subculture that originated in the early 1800s as a product of the Latter Day Saint movement led principally by Joseph Smith... Heaven is an afterlife concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies. ... Heaven is an afterlife concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies. ... Within Mormonism, the Degrees of Glory refer to: Celestial Kingdom Terrestrial Kingdom Telestial Kingdom A state called Outer Darkness is not a degree of glory, but is often discussed in this context. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Joseph Smith, Jr., the restorer of Mormonism, provided a description of the afterlife based primarily upon a vision he reportedly received together with his associate Sidney Rigdon, at Hiram, Ohio, February 16, 1832, and recorded in Doctrine and Covenants, Section 76. Joseph Smith, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hiram is a village located in Portage County, Ohio. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes referred to as the D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of Mormonism. ...


According to Smith and Rigdon, the afterworld consists of three "degrees of glory", called the Celestial Kingdom, the Terrestrial Kingdom (terrestrial meaning "earthly"), and the Telestial Kingdom (the word telestial is a neologism not used in other contexts; see its own article for some possible derivations). According to the doctrine of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Terrestrial Kingdom is an eternal status in the afterlife to which some portion of humankind will be assigned following resurrection and the judgment day. ... The Telestial Kingdom is an eternal status in the afterlife to which some portion of humankind will be assigned following resurrection and the judgment day, according to the doctrine of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... A neologism is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, or to reshape older terms in newer language form. ...


According to this doctrine, only those who attain the Celestial Kingdom will be united with their families in the eternities. It will be the residence of those who have been righteous, accepted the Gospel (Mormonism) and its ordinances and covenants, and lived their lives in harmony with their covenants or received the ordinances and covenants with all their hearts in the spirit world. While in the popular mind, eternity often simply means existing for an infinite, i. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the most-recognized architectural symbol of Mormonism Mormonism is a religion, movement, ideology, and subculture that originated in the early 1800s as a product of the Latter Day Saint movement led principally by Joseph Smith...


“They are they who received the testimony of Jesus, and believed on his name and were baptized after the manner of his burial, being buried in the water in his name, and this according to the commandment which he has given--That by keeping the commandments they might be washed and cleansed from all their sins, and receive the Holy Spirit by the laying on of the hands of him who is ordained and sealed unto this power; And who overcome by faith, and are sealed by the Holy Spirit of promise, which the Father sheds forth upon all those who are just and true.” (Doctrine and Covenants, 76:51-53) Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes referred to as the D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of Mormonism. ...


Children who die before the age of eight all qualify for the Celestial Kingdom in the afterlife, as well as those who did not have the chance to receive the gospel in this life, but do in the post-mortal spirit world (see Baptism for the dead). Persons who reach maturity and receive full gospel teachings in this life will only be judged by God to be worthy of the Celestial Kingdom if they have received all required ordinances (baptism, endowment, and sealing if they are married), repented of their sins, and endured to the end through retaining their conversion. Some rebellious children of righteous parents may, like Alma the Younger in the Book of Mormon, receive a spiritual awakening in this life or in the spirit world whereby they finally understand and embrace the teachings of their parents and the atonement of Jesus Christ. (Alma 36:5-24) The afterlife (or life after death) is a generic term referring to a continuation of existence, typically spiritual and experiential, beyond this world, or after death. ... Baptism for the dead is an ordinance performed today in temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for those who have died without having been baptized by one having authority. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Repentance is the feeling and act in which one recognizes and tries to right a wrong, or gain forgiveness from someone that they wronged. ...


The Celestial Kingdom is the residence of God the Father and Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost dwells there. Those who are worthy to dwell in the Celestial Kingdom will be exalted, and become God-like. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... The Holy Spirit, from the Christian viewpoint, while related to Gods will, is not Gods will personified. ... Exaltation or Eternal Progression is a seminal doctrinal belief among devout members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church or Mormons) that mankind, as spirit children of their Father in Heaven, can become like, not equivalent to, Him. ...


Smith taught that the Earth will receive a celestial glory. Because of this, many Mormons believe that the Earth will be the Celestial Kingdom, or a Celestial World within the Celestial Kingdom, for Humans who lived on the Earth and qualified for Celestial glory.


Possible Correlations

Smith's own description of the Celestial Kingdom contains both striking similarities and fundamental differences to Swedenborg's work.


At least one historian has suggested that Smith may have been familiar with Swedenborg's writings during the Kirtland or Nauvoo period. Most similar books that supported various doctrines introduced by Smith were discussed in Church publications, however this particular one was not discussed in contemporary accounts, and claims one way or the other cannot be verified. However, during the Utah period, the book was purchased from a New York publisher and referenced by church leaders.


See also

Celestial Marriage is a doctrine peculiar to the Mormon religious movement, particularly The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS). ... In temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the celestial room symbolizes life as eternal families with our Heavenly Father and His Son, Jesus Christ(Temple brochure, LDS Church). ... The Salt Lake Temple contains a Holy of Holies. ...

External links

  • Words used in Swedenborg (A-D)
  • Doctrine and Covenants, Section 76
Concepts of Heaven
Judeo-Christian Kingdom of God | Garden of Eden · Paradise | New Jerusalem
Islamic Jannah | Houri | Sidrat al-Muntaha
Mormon Celestial Kingdom | Spirit world
Ancient Greek Elysium | Empyrean | Hesperides
Celtic Annwn | Tír na nÓg | Mag Mell
Norse Valhalla | Asgard
Other cultures Paradise | Olam Haba | Svarga | Aaru | The Summerland | Myth of Er | Fortunate Isles
Related concepts Nirvana | Millennialism | Utopianism | Golden Age | Arcadia | Pearly gates

Heaven is an afterlife concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... The Kingdom of God (Greek basileia tou theou,[1] or the Kingdom of Heaven) is a key concept in Christianity based on a phrase attributed to Jesus of Nazareth in the gospels. ... The Fall of Man by Lucas Cranach, a 16th century German depiction of Eden The Garden of Eden (from Hebrew Gan Ēden, גַּן עֵדֶן) is described in the Book of Genesis as being the place where the first man - Adam - and woman - Eve - lived after they were created by God. ... Paradise, by Jan Bruegel The word paradise is derived from the Avestan word pairidaeza (a walled enclosure), which is a compound of pairi- (around), a cognate of the Greek peri-, and -diz (to create, make), a cognate of the English dough. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, including people named Islam, see Islam (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Islam, the houri (Arabic , pl. ... Sidrat al-Muntahā (Arabic: سدرة المنتهى ) is a lote tree that marks the end of the seventh heaven, the boundary where no creation can pass, according to Islamic beliefs. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the most-recognized architectural symbol of Mormonism Mormonism is a religion, movement, ideology, and subculture that originated in the early 1800s as a product of the Latter Day Saint movement led principally by Joseph Smith... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... // For the band, see Elysium (band). ... Empyrean (from the Med. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... Annwn or Annwfn, ( under-world or un-world, sometimes inaccurately written Annwyn, Annwyfn or Annwfyn) was the Otherworld, the land of souls that had departed this world in Welsh mythology. ... Tír na nÓg, called in English the Land of the Young, was the most popular of the Otherworlds in Irish mythology, perhaps best known from the myth of Oisín and Niamh of the Golden Hair. ... In Irish mythology, Mag Mell (plain of joy), also called Tír na nÓg (land of the young), Land of the Living, the Many-colored Land and the Promised Land, was a mythical realm achievable through death and/or glory. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In this illustration from a 17th century Icelandic manuscript, Heimdall is shown guarding the gate of Valhalla. ... In Norse mythology, Asgard (Old Norse: Ásgarður) is the realm of the gods, the Æsir, thought to be separate from the realm of the mortals, Midgard. ... Paradise, by Jan Bruegel The word paradise is derived from the Avestan word pairidaeza (a walled enclosure), which is a compound of pairi- (around), a cognate of the Greek peri-, and -diz (to create, make), a cognate of the English dough. ... Jewish eschatology is concerned with Mashiach (the Jewish Messiah) the continuation of the Davidic line, and Olam Haba (Hebrew for the world to come; i. ... In Hinduism, (Sanskrit: स्वर्ग) Svarga (or Swarga) is set of nether worlds located on Mt. ... In Egyptian mythology, the fields of Aaru (alternatives: Yaaru, Iaru, Aalu), are the heavenly underworld where Osiris ruled. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Myth of Er is an analogy used in Platos Republic. ... The Fortunate Isles, also called the Isles (or Islands) of the Blessed (makarôn nêsoi). ... [ (Devanagari , Pali: Nibbāna निब्बान -- Chinese: 涅槃; Pinyin: niè pán), literally extinction and/or extinguishing (ie, of the passions) is a mode of being that is free from mind-contaminants (Kilesa) such as lust, anger or craving. ... Millennialism (or chiliasm), from millennium, which literally means thousand years, is primarily a belief expressed in some Christian denominations, and literature, that there will be a Golden Age or Paradise on Earth where Christ will reign prior to the final judgment and future eternal state, primarily derived from the book... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into utopia. ... The Golden Age by Pietro da Cortona. ... Arcadia is a poetical name for fantasy land (having more or less the same notation as Utopia ), named after the Greek land. ... The Pearly gates, in Christianity, is an informal name for the gateway to Heaven, inspired by the description of the New Jerusalem in Revelation 21:21— The image of the gates in popular culture is a set of large, white, wrought-iron gates in the clouds, guarded by Saint Peter. ...

References

  • Swedenborg, Emanuel. (1984) Heaven and Hell Trans. George F. Dole. New York: Swedenborg Foundation. ISBN 0-87785-476-9

  Results from FactBites:
 
Celestial, Terrestrial, and Telestial Kingdoms - MormonWiki - Mormonism - the LDS Church, Beliefs & Religion (854 words)
These kingdoms are where all men and women, with the exception of Sons of Perdition, who will go to Outer Darkness, will go after they are judged of God and resurrected (their spirits reunited with their then immortal bodies).
The Celestial Kingdom is the highest and most glorious of the degrees of glory and is symbolically represented by the sun.
The Terrestrial kingdom is symbolically represented as the moon.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Terrestrial Kingdom (734 words)
The Terrestrial Kingdom is the middle of three "degrees of glory," in which the highest or Celestial Kingdom is compared to the sun, the middle or Terrestrial Kingdom is compared to the moon,
The angels in the Lord's celestial kingdom, from their more interior reception of the Divine of the Lord, far excel in wisdom and glory the angels that are in His spiritual kingdom; for they are in love to the Lord, and consequently are nearer and more closely conjoined to Him.
The Celestial Kingdom is the residence of God the Father and Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost dwells there.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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