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Encyclopedia > Celesta
French type, four-octave Celesta

The Celesta (IPA [səˈlɛstə]) is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. Its appearance is very similar to that of a piano. The keys are connected to hammers which strike a graduated set of metal (usually steel) plates suspended over wooden resonators. There is a pedal to sustain or dampen the sound. Download high resolution version (512x768, 122 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (512x768, 122 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet can be used to show pronounciation in English. ... An idiophone is any musical instrument which creates sound primarily by way of the instrument vibrating itself, without the use of strings or membranes. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... A resonator is a device or part that vibrates (or oscillates) with waves. ...


The sound of the celesta is akin to that of the glockenspiel, but with a much softer timbre. This quality gave rise to the instrument's name, celeste meaning "heavenly" in French. Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ...


The celesta is a transposing instrument, sounding one octave higher than written. The original French instrument had a five-octave range, but as the lowest octave was considered somewhat unsatisfactory, it was omitted from later models. Ironically, the standard French four-octave instrument is now gradually being replaced in symphony orchestras by a larger, five-octave German model. Although treated as a member of the percussion section in orchestral terms, it is usually played by a pianist, the part being normally written on two bracketed staves. A transposing instrument is a musical instrument whose music is written at a pitch different from concert pitch. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ...

Contents

History

The celesta was invented in 1889 by the Parisian harmonium builder Auguste Mustel. Mustel's father, Victor Mustel, had developed the forerunner of the celesta, the typophone or the dulcitone, in 1860. This consisted of struck tuning-forks instead of metal plates, but the sound produced was considered too small to be of use in an orchestral situation. it smells!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!gayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yes 3+56 Pyotr Tchaikovsky is cited as the first major composer to use this instrument in a symphonic work for full orchestra; it appears in his last symphonic poem The Voyevoda (Op. 3, 1868; premiered 1891)[1] and in passages from his last ballet The Nutcracker (Op. 71, 1892) and its derived Opus 71a, The Nutcracker Suite — most notably the "Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy." Ernest Chausson preceded him by employing the celesta in his incidental music for La tempête in 1888, written for a small orchestra.[2] Charles Widor had also used it in his ballet La Korrigane in 1880.[3] It has been suggested that List of visitor attractions in Paris be merged into this article or section. ... A Harmonium is a free-standing musical keyboard instrument similar to a Reed Organ or Pipe Organ. ... A dulcitone is a keyboard instrument in which sound is produced by a range of tuning forks, which vibrate when struck by felt-covered hammers activated by the keyboard. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... A symphonic poem or tone poem is a piece of orchestral music, in one movement, in which some extra-musical programme provides a narrative or illustrative element. ... The cover of P. Yurgensons edition of 4-hand transcription of the Overture to Voyevoda Voyevoda or Voevoda (Russian: Воевода – The Voivode) is an opera in 3 acts and 4 scenes, Op. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... (left to right) Sergei Legat, as the Nutcracker, an unidentified child as a gingerbread soldier, and Lydia Rubtsova as Marianna in Vsevolozhskys costumes for the Ivanov/Petipa/Tchaikovsky The Nutcracker, St. ... Ernest Chausson (January 20, 1855 – June 10, 1899) was a late-blooming French romantic composer who died in an accident just as his career was beginning to flourish. ... Charles-Marie Jean Albert Widor (February 21, 1844 – March 12, 1937) was a French organist, composer and teacher. ...


Works featuring the celesta

The celesta, as with most orchestral instruments, is mainly found in classical music, as well as in many film scores and a few musicals. The following is a list of major and minor works that feature the instrument: This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ...

“Mozart” redirects here. ... Die Zauberflöte (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Modest Mussorgsky in 1876 Khovanshchina (Russian: , Hovánščina, sometimes rendered The Khovansky Affair) is an opera (subtitled a national music drama) in five acts by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich (Russian Дмитрий Дмитриевич Шостакович) (September 25, 1906 – August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Maurice Ravel. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... (left to right) Sergei Legat, as the Nutcracker, an unidentified child as a gingerbread soldier, and Lydia Rubtsova as Marianna in Vsevolozhskys costumes for the Ivanov/Petipa/Tchaikovsky The Nutcracker, St. ... Ernest Chausson (January 20, 1855 – June 10, 1899) was a late-blooming French romantic composer who died in an accident just as his career was beginning to flourish. ... Charles-Marie Jean Albert Widor (February 21, 1844 – March 12, 1937) was a French organist, composer and teacher. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Victorien Sardous drama, La Tosca. ... For the opera by Ferruccio Busoni, see Turandot (Busoni). ... Schoenberg redirects here. ... The Gurre-Lieder form a massive oratorio for 5 soloists, reciter, chorus and orchestra, composed by Arnold Schoenberg, on poem texts by Danish novelist Jens Peter Jacobsen (translated from Danish to German by Robert Franz Arnold). ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Coin of Salome (daughter of Herodias), queen of Chalcis and Armenia Minor. ... Der Rosenkavalier (The Cavalier of the Rose) is a comic opera in three acts by Richard Strauss to an original German libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal. ... Ariadne auf Naxos (Ariadne on Naxos) is an opera by Richard Strauss with libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) is particularly interesting among Gustav Mahlers symphonic works. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pétrouchka (English: Petrushka; Russian: петрушка) is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. ... Reinhold Moritzovich Glière Reinhold Moritzovich Glière (Russian: , Rejngold Moricevič Glièr) (January 11, 1875 [O.S. 30 December 1874] – June 23, 1956) was a Soviet composer of German descent. ... For the Russian bomber Ilya Muromets, see Ilya Muromets. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... A Kékszakállú herceg vára, (commonly referred to by its English name, Bluebeards Castle) is a one-act opera by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók. ... Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a piece of classical music by Béla Bartók. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Clair de Lune (Moonlight in French) is the name of various works in various fields of the arts. ... The Suite Bergamasque (ber-gah-mask) is one of the most famous piano suites of Claude Debussy, and is widely regarded as the most fascinating. ... Images pour orchestre is an orchestral composition in three movements (one of which is itself a triptych) by Claude Debussy. ... Jeux (Games), described as a poème dansé (literally a danced poem), is the last work for orchestra written by Claude Debussy. ... Charles Edward Ives (October 20, 1874 – May 19, 1954) was an American composer of classical music. ... The Symphony No. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Lieutenant Kije (Подпоручик Киже) is a short story by the Soviet author Yuri Nikolaevich Tynyanov (1894-1943) published in 1927. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... Sergei Prokofievs Symphony-Concerto in E minor (sometimes also called Sinfonia Concertante), is a large-scale work for cello and orchestra. ... Frederick Albert Theodore Delius CH (January 29, 1862, – June 10, 1934) was an English composer born in Bradford in the West Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ... Eventyr (Once Upon a Time) is a tone poem for orchestra composed by Frederick Delius in 1917; it was given its premiere in London on January 11, 1919, under the direction of Henry J. Wood. ... Korngold conducting the Warner Brothers studio orchestra (Rhino Records) Erich Wolfgang Korngold (May 29, 1897 – November 29, 1957) was a 20th century romantic composer. ... Die tote Stadt (German for The Dead City) is an opera in Three Acts by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. ... The Violin Concerto in D major, op. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... Flos Campi: suite for solo viola, small chorus and small orchestra is a composition by the British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, completed in 1925. ... The English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams gave the Italian title Sinfonia antartica (Antarctic Symphony) to his seventh symphony. ... William (Havergal) Brian (January 29, 1876 – November 28, 1972), was a British composer. ... Havergal Brians Symphony No. ... Maurice Ravel. ... LHeure espagnole (The Spanish Hour) is a one act opera buffa by Maurice Ravel to a French libretto by Franc Nohain, based on his comedy. ... Ma Mère lOye (Mother Goose), is a musical work by French composer Maurice Ravel. ... Daphnis et Chloé is a ballet with music by Maurice Ravel. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... Tzigane is a rhapsody type of composition by the French composer Maurice Ravel. ... The bolero is a type of dance and musical form. ... Paul Dukas (October 1, 1865-May 17, 1935) was a Parisian-born French composer and teacher of classical music. ... La Péri (English: The Peri), or The Flower of Immortality, is a 1912 ballet in one act by Jewish-French composer Paul Dukas, originally choreographed by Ivan Clustine and first performed in Paris, about a mans search for immortality and encounter with a mythological Peri. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... The Planets Op. ... Arthur Honegger in 1921. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... Portrait of Alban Berg by Arnold Schoenberg, c. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... This article is about the singing voice part. ... Wozzeck is the first opera by the Austrian composer Alban Berg (1885-1935). ... Carl Nielsen Carl August Nielsen (June 9, 1865, Sortelung – October 3, 1931, Copenhagen) was a conductor, violinist, and the most internationally known composer from Denmark. ... The Symphony No. ... Elsa and Ottorino Respighi in the 1920s Ottorino Respighi (Bologna, July 9, 1879 - Rome, April 18, 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist, pianist, violist and violinist. ... Fontane di Roma (Italian Fountains of Rome) is a 1916 work by the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi, now considered apart of the Roman Trilogy of symphonic poems along with Feste Romane and Pini di Roma. ... Pini di Roma (Italian “Pines of Rome”) is a 1924 work by the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi, and is considered one of the masterpieces of the Roman Trilogy of symphonic poems along with Feste Romane and Fontane di Roma. ... Metropolis is a silent science fiction film created by the famed Austrian-German director Fritz Lang. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Cover of the original sheet music of the two piano version of Rhapsody in Blue. ... 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular american orchestral leader. ... An American in Paris is a symphonic composition by American composer George Gershwin which debuted in 1928. ... Ferde Grofé (New York City, March 27, 1892 – Santa Monica, California, April 3, 1972) was a United States composer, pianist, and arranger. ... The Grand Canyon Suite is a popular suite by Ferde Grofé. It consists in 5 parts or movements, each an evocation in tone of a particular scene typical of the Grand Canyon. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Káťa Kabanová is an opera in three acts by LeoÅ¡ Janáček to a Czech translation by Vincenc Cervinka, first produced in Brno on 23 November 1921. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... Ionisation (1929 - 1931) is a musical composition by Edgard Varèse written for thirteen percussionists playing the following instruments: 3 Bass Drums, 2 Side Drums, 2 Snare Drums, Tarole, 2 Bongos, Tambourine, Tambour militaire, crash cymbal, suspended cymbals, 3 tam-tams, gong, 2 anvils, 2 trinagles, sleigh bells, chimes, celesta... Heitor Villa-Lobos (March 5, 1887 - November 17, 1959) was a Brazilian composer, possibly the best-known classical composer born in South America. ... Dmitri Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906–August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Cello Concerto No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... Olivier Messiaen (December 10, 1908–April 27, 1992) was a French composer, organist, and ornithologist. ... The Turangalîla-Symphonie is a large-scale piece of orchestral music by Olivier Messiaen. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... Aaron Coplands third and final symphony was written at the end of World War II. Its the essential American symphony that fuses his distinct Americana style of the ballets (Rodeo, etc. ... Leonard Constant Lambert (August 23, 1905 – August 21, 1951) was a British composer and conductor. ... Anna Karenina (also known in the UK as Tolstoys Anna Karenina) is a 1948 British film based on the 19th century novel, Anna Karenina, by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy. ... Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten, OM CH (November 22, 1913 Lowestoft, Suffolk - December 4, 1976 Aldeburgh, Suffolk) was a British composer, conductor, and pianist. ... The Turn of the Screw is a little-known 20th century English opera composed by Benjamin Britten, based on the novel The Turn of the Screw by Henry James. ... Witold Roman Lutosławski (January 25, 1913- February 7, 1994) was a Polish classical composer, pianist and conductor. ... Polish composer Witold LutosÅ‚awskis Concerto for Orchestra was written in the years 1950-54, on the initiative of the artistic director of the Warsaw Philharmonic, Witold Rowicki, to whom it is dedicated. ... A page from the score of the symphony. ... Sir Michael Kemp Tippett, O.M. (2 January 1905 – 8 January 1998) was one of the foremost English composers of the 20th century. ... The Midsummer Marriage is an opera in three acts by Michael Tippett, with a libretto by the composer. ... King Priam is an opera by Michael Tippett, to his own libretto based on Homers Iliad. ... The Knot Garden is an opera in three acts by Michael Tippett to an original English libretto by the composer. ... This article is about the singing voice part. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... The Ice Break is an opera by Michael Tippett, to an original English libretto by the composer. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... Voila is the forthcoming seventh proper solo album by Belinda Carlisle, due to be released in early 2007. ... The violoncello, usually abbreviated to cello, or cello (the c is pronounced as in the ch of check), is a bowed stringed instrument, a member of the violin family. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Leonard Bernsteins 2nd Symphony known as The age of anxiety was composed from 1948 to 1949 in the US and Israel. ... For The Games song, see Westside Story (song). ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Sir William Turner Walton, OM (March 29, 1902–March 8, 1983) was a British composer whose style was influenced by the works of Stravinsky, Sibelius and jazz. ... The Symphony No. ... Bernd Alois Zimmermann (Bliesheim, March 20, 1918 - Grosskönigsdorf, August 10, 1970) is a German composer. ... Die Soldaten (The Soldiers) is a four act opera in German by German composer Bernd Alois Zimmermann, based on the 1776 play by Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz. ... William Mathias (November 1, 1934 — July 29, 1992) was a Welsh composer. ... Alexander Knayfel in Sortavala, August 1982 Alexander Aronovich Knayfel (Russian: , Knayfel, Knaifel; born November 28, 1943 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan) is a Russian composer known for his operas The Ghost of Canterville and Alice in Wonderland as well as for his music for cinema. ... The Canterville Ghost (also The Ghost of Canterville, Russian: Кантервильское привидение – Kantervíl’skoye privedénie, however usually spelt as Кентервильское привидение – Kentervíl’skoye privedénie; French: Le fantôme de Canterville, German: Das Gespenst von Canterville), an opera by the Russian composer Alexander Knayfel’ (Russian: Кнайфель; Alexandre Knaifel, Knayfel) in three acts for... Alexander Vustin Alexander Kuzmich Vustin, also Voustin or Wustin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Кузьми́ч Ву́стин, born: April 24, 1943, Moscow) is a Russian composer. ... The Devil in Love (French: Le Diable amoureux; Russian: Влюблённый дьявол – Vlyublyonny dyavol) is an opera in three acts by the Russian composer Alexander Vustin (b. ... Henri Dutilleux (born January 22, 1916 in Angers, France) is one of the most important French composers of the second half of the 20th century, producing work in the tradition of Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy, and Albert Roussel, but in a style distinctly his own. ... Timbres, espace, mouvement (Pitch, space, movement) is a work for orchestra composed by Henri Dutilleux in 1978. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Edison Denisov (April 6, 1929 - November 24, 1996) was a Russian composer from Tomsk, Siberia. ... Lécume des jours (English: The Foam of Days) is an opera in three acts (14 scenes) by the Russian composer Edison Denisov. ... Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Luciano Berio (October 24, 1925 – May 27, 2003) was an Italian composer. ... Dmitri N. Smirnov Dmitri Nikolaevich Smirnov (Russian: Дми́трий Никола́евич Смирно́в) (born November 2, 1948, Minsk) is a Russian and British (since 1991) composer. ... Scene 3: The Clod leads Thel to see the places of the dead Thel or The Lamentations of Thel (Russian: Тэль or Жалобы Тэли – Zhaloby Teli) is a chamber opera in four scenes with Prologue by a Russian composer Dmitri N. Smirnov to his own libretto after William Blake. ... Rudolf Kostas as Tiriel on the poster of the Freiburger Stadttheater Tiriel (Russian: Тириэль, 1985) is an opera by a Russian composer Dmitri N. Smirnov in three acts (9 scenes) with a Symphonic Prologue to his own libretto after a poem of the same title by William Blake. ... Hans Werner Henze (born July 1, 1926 in Gütersloh, Westphalia, Germany) is a composer well known for his left-wing political beliefs. ... Hans Werner Henze composed the nine Sacred Concertos that comprise his Requiem over the course of three years from 1991 to 1993 on commissions from the London Sinfonietta, Suntory Corporation for the NHK Philharmonic, and Westdeutschen Rundfunks Köln. ... Nikolai Korndorf (1947-2001) was a composer. ... The correspondence between Rilke and Tsvetaeva, in German, Insel, 1992 ISBN:3458163360 MR (Marina and Rainer) is a chamber opera in one act (5 scenes) by the Russian composer Nikolai Korndorf (1947-2001). ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid it being considered... A scene from the opera The Nightingale and the Rose by Elena Firsova The Nightingale and the Rose (Russian: Соловей и роза – Solovey i roza) is a chamber opera in one act (five scenes) by Russian composer Elena Firsova (Op. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Heroes Symphony is a symphony (also known as Symphony No. ... A Toltec Symphony (also known as Symphony No. ... Jonathan Dove (July 18, 1959 - ) is a British composer of opera and choral works and theatre, film, orchestral and chamber music. ... Flight is a English opera in two acts, with music by Jonathan Dove and libretto by April De Angelis. ... Williams conducting the London Symphony Orchestra during the recording of the score for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Audio sample: Prologue (2001) (file info) — 47 second sample from John Williamss composed movie-soundtrack, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, this version is widely used (Track #1 Problems playing the files? See media help. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, known in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... Jason Robert Brown (born 1970 in Ossining, New York) is an American musical theater composer and lyricist. ... The Last Five Years is a one act musical written by Jason Robert Brown. ... Adam Guettel (pronounced Gettle; b. ... The Light in the Piazza is a musical with a book by Craig Lucas and music and lyrics by Adam Guettel. ... Brett Dean (1961 - ) is a contemporary Australian composer and violist. ... For the Alaska-based postminimalist composer, see John Luther Adams. ... Century Rolls is a 1997 piano concerto written by the American minimalist composer John Adams and commissioned by Emanuel Ax. ... A Flowering Tree is an opera in two acts composed by John Coolidge Adams with libretto by Adams and Peter Sellars, and commissioned by the New Crowned Hope Festival in Vienna, the San Francisco Symphony, the Barbican Centre in London, the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York... Michael Daugherty (born April 28, 1954 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa) is an American composer. ... The Scarecrow is an opera commissioned by a consortium of twelve universities. ... Guto Pryderi Puw (born 1971)[1] is a Welsh composer, university lecturer and conductor. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Baritone (French: ; German: ; Italian: ) is most commonly the type of male voice that lies between bass and tenor. ... Esa-Pekka Salonen ( ) (born June 30, 1958 in Helsinki) is a prominent Finnish orchestral conductor and composer. ...

In popular music

The celesta has also featured in popular music here and there since the mid twentieth century:

Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... Brilliant Corners Brilliant Corners is a 1957 (see 1957 in music) album by jazz musician Thelonious Monk. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959),[1] better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of rock and roll. ... Meade Anderson Lux Lewis (1905 - 1964) was a United States pianist and composer noted for his work in the Boogie Woogie style. ... First formed in 1961, The Beach Boys are an American rock and roll band that gained popularity for their close vocal harmonies and lyrics reflecting a California youth culture of surfing, girls and cars. ... Girl Dont Tell Me is a song written by Brian Wilson for the American pop band The Beach Boys. ... Richard George Fariña ( March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966 ) was an American writer and folksinger. ... Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... Frederick Dewayne Hubbard (born April 7, 1938 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American jazz trumpeter. ... Donovan (Donovan Philips Leitch, born May 10, 1946, in Maryhill, Glasgow) is a Scottish singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Sunshine Superman is the title of a 1965 song written and recorded by British popular musician Donovan; it is also became title track of his 1966 album of the same name. ... Mellow Yellow is the fourth album from Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Sunday Morning is a song by The Velvet Underground which is the opening track on their first album The Velvet Underground and Nico. ... Alternate covers The early LP edition with the banana sticker peeled off. ... Johnny Costa (January 18, 1922 – October 11, 1996) was an accomplished jazz pianist. ... Mister Rogers Neighborhood or Mister Rogers is an American childrens television series that was created and hosted by Fred Rogers. ... The Mothers of Invention were a rock and roll band active from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... Absolutely Free is the name of the ninth song in the Mothers Of Invention fourth LP, Were Only In It For The Money. ... The Mothers of Invention chronology Alternate cover Zappas intended cover was changed to this portion of the inside sleeve. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their avant-garde progressive rock music. ... Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun is a song by art rock band Pink Floyd, and is featured on their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets (1968). ... The Move were one of the leading British rock bands of the 1960s from Birmingham, England. ... Scott Walker can refer to more than one person: Scott Walker (singer) (born 1943), singer Scott Walker (politician) (born 1967), county executive of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Scott Walker (boxer) (1969-2004), boxer Scott Walker (hockey player) (born 1973), professional hockey player Scott Walker (the ultimate beast) (born 1983), professional degen... Scott 3 is the third solo album by singer songwriter Scott Walker. ... Procol Harum is an English rock band, formed in the 1960s, who built a heavy foundation for what would become progressive rock. ... A Salty Dog, by Procol Harum, was released in 1969. ... Nicholas Rodney Drake (June 19, 1948 – November 25, 1974) was an English singer-songwriter and musician best known for his acoustic, autumnal songs. ... Northern Sky is a song from Nick Drakes 1970 album Bryter Layter. ... Bryter Layter, recorded in 1970, was the second of three albums by British folk musician Nick Drake. ... Moody Blue is a song written by Mark James — also known for writing Suspicious Minds — and recorded by Elvis Presley. ... U2 (IPA: /ju. ... Bad is the seventh track from U2s 1984 album, The Unforgettable Fire. ... The Unforgettable Fire is an album by Irish rock band U2, released in 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... The Stooges are an American rock band that was first active from around 1967 to 1974, and then reformed in 2003. ... Raw Power is a 1973 album by American rock music group The Stooges. ... Wings was a rock music band led by Paul McCartney and formed in August 1971, shortly after the breakup of The Beatles. ... Red Rose Speedway is Paul McCartneys fourth album release and second Wings album, officially credited to Paul McCartney & Wings upon its 1973 release, after the relatively weak commercial performance of the bands debut Wild Life had been credited only to the then-unknown Wings. ... Henry Gross (born April 1, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York), is a singer-songwriter best known for his 1976 top-10 hit Shannon. Gross began his career with Sha Na Na as a guitarist. ... Alfred McCoy Tyner (born December 11, 1938) is a jazz pianist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, best known for his work with the John Coltrane Quartet. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Real Love is a song originally written and performed as a demo by John Lennon, later redone by the remaining members of The Beatles in late 1995. ... Mr. ... Eliogabalus is the second official album by the Italian/slovenian rock band Devil Doll, released on January 5, 1990 on Hurdy Gurdy Records. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Off the Ground (OTG) is a youth theatre and professional theatre run by Dan Meigh. ... Eels (also sometimes eels or EELS, depending on the album) is an American rock band formed by singer/songwriter Mark Oliver Everett, better known as Mr. ... Flyswatter is a single by the American rock band, EELS. It is the second single from their 2000 album, Daisies of the Galaxy. ... Daisies of the Galaxy is an album by Eels. ... Blinking Lights and Other Revelations (2005) is a double album by the band Eels. ... This article is about the musician. ... Selmasongs is an album released in September of 2000 by Icelandic singer and actress Björk as a soundtrack to the film Dancer in the Dark, in which she also starred as the main character, Selma. ... For other articles with similar names, see Vespertine (disambiguation). ... Family Tree is a boxed set of musical material by Icelandic singer Björk. ... The Divine Comedy is a pop band from Northern Ireland fronted by Neil Hannon. ... Death Cab for Cutie is an American band formed in Bellingham, Washington in 1997. ... Transatlanticism is an album by Death Cab for Cutie. ... The Polyphonic Spree is a self-described choral symphonic rock group from the Dallas, Texas area. ... For the Evanescence song, see Lithium (Evanescence song). ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Takk. ... They Might Be Giants (commonly abbreviated to TMBG) is an American alternative rock duo consisting of John Linnell and John Flansburgh that formed in 1982. ... TMBG studio album chronology The Else is the twelfth studio album by rock duo They Might Be Giants, released by Idlewild Records in 2007. ... Arcade Fire (often known as The Arcade Fire) is an anthem rock band from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...

References

  1. ^ Freed, Richard. [LP Jacket notes.] Tchaikovsky: "Fatum," [...] "The Storm," [...] "The Voyevoda." Bochum Orchestra. Othmar Maga, conductor. Vox Stereo STPL 513.460. New York: Vox Productions, Inc., 1975.
  2. ^ Blades, James and Holland, James. "Celesta"; Gallois, Jean. "Chausson, Ernest: Works," Grove Music Online (Accessed 8 April 2006) (subscription required)
  3. ^ The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Musical Instruments, ISBN 1-85868-185-5, p104

April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

A Rhodes piano A Rhodes piano is a musical instrument, a brand of electric piano. ... A dulcitone is a keyboard instrument in which sound is produced by a range of tuning forks, which vibrate when struck by felt-covered hammers activated by the keyboard. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Celesta
  • NPR - The Celesta: The Sound of the Sugar Plum Fairy
  • Comprehensive article with photos, history etc.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Celesta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (539 words)
The Celesta (IPA [tʃəˈlɛstə]) is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard.
The celesta was invented in 1724 by the Parisian harmonium builder Auguste Mustel.
Mustel's father, Victor Mustel, had developed the forerunner of the celesta, the typophone or the dulcitone, in 1709.
celesta: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (852 words)
The sound of the celesta is akin to that of the glockenspiel, but with a much softer timbre.
Although treated as a member of the percussion section in orchestral terms, it is usually played by a pianist, the part being normally written on two bracketed staves.
The celesta was invented in 1886 by the Parisian harmonium builder Auguste Mustel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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