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Encyclopedia > Celeron
Celeron
Central processing unit

Produced: From April 1998 to Current
Manufacturer: Intel
Max CPU clock: 266 MHz to 3.60 GHz
FSB speeds: 66 MHz to 800 MT/s
Process:
(MOSFET channel length)
0.25 µm to 0.065 µm
Instruction set: x86, x86-64
Microarchitecture: P6, NetBurst, Core
Sockets:
Core names:
  • Covington
  • Mendocino
  • Coppermine-128
  • Tualatin-256
  • Willamette-128
  • Northwood-128
  • Prescott-256

The Celeron brand refers to a range of Intel's x86 CPUs for budget/value personal computers. Considered Intel's "economic" processor, the Celeron branded processors have complemented Intel's higher-performance (and more expensive) brands. Intel has given the brand the motto, "delivering great quality at an exceptional value." Celeron processors can run all IA-32 computer programs, but their performance is somewhat lower when compared to similar, but higher priced, Intel CPU brands. For example, the Celeron brand will often have less cache memory, or have advanced features purposely disabled. These missing features have had a variable impact on performance. In some cases, the effect was significant and in other cases the differences were relatively minor. Many of the Celeron designs have achieved a very high "bang to the buck," while at other times, the performance difference has been noticeable. For example, some intense application software, such as cutting edge PC games, programs for video compression, video editing, or solid modeling (CAD, engineering analysis, computer graphics and animation, rapid prototyping, medical testing, product visualization, and visualization of scientific research), etc.[1] may not perform as well on the Celeron family. This has been the primary justification for the higher cost of other Intel CPU brands vs. the Celeron. CPU redirects here. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... CPU redirects here. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... A typical north/southbridge layout In personal computers, the Front Side Bus (FSB) is the data transfer bus that carries information between the CPU and the northbridge of the Motherboard. ... A megahertz (MHz) is one million (106) hertz, a measure of frequency. ... Megatransfer is a term used in computer technology, referring to a number of data transfers (or operations). ... The metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET, MOS-FET, or MOS FET) is by far the most common field-effect transistor in both digital and analog circuits. ... A micrometre (American spelling: micrometer, symbol µm) is an SI unit of length equal to one millionth of a metre, or about a tenth of the diameter of a droplet of mist or fog. ... An instruction set is (a list of) all instructions, and all their variations, that a processor can execute. ... x86 or 80x86 is the generic name of a microprocessor architecture first developed and manufactured by Intel. ... The AMD64 or x86-64 is a 64-bit processor architecture invented by AMD. It is a superset of the x86 architecture, which it natively supports. ... In computer engineering, microarchitecture (sometime abbreviated to µarch or uarch) is a description of the electrical circuitry of a computer, central processing unit, or digital signal processor that is sufficient for completely describing the operation of the hardware. ... The P6 microarchitecture is the sixth generation Intel x86 microprocessor architecture, released in 1995. ... The Intel NetBurst Microarchitecture, called P68 inside Intel, was the successor to the P6 microarchitecture in the x86 family of CPUs made by Intel. ... The Intel Core microarchitecture (previously known as the Intel Next-Generation Micro-Architecture, or NGMA) is a multi-core processor microarchitecture unveiled by Intel in Q1 2006. ... Slot 1 refers to the physical and electrical specification for the connector used by some of Intels microprocessors, including the Celeron, Pentium II and the Pentium III. Slot 1 was a departure from the square ZIF PGA/SPGA sockets used for the Pentium and earlier processors. ... Socket 370 is a common format of CPU socket first used by Intel for Celeron processors to replace the older Slot 1 CPU interface on personal computers. ... In computing, Socket 478 is a type of CPU socket used for Intels Pentium 4 and Celeron series CPUs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Socket M (sometimes referred to as FCPGA6) is a CPU interface introduced by Intel in 2006 for the Intel Core line of mobile processors [1]. It is currently used in all Intel Core products, as well as the Core-derived Dual-Core Xeon codenamed Sossaman. It is also used in... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... x86 or 80x86 is the generic name of a microprocessor architecture first developed and manufactured by Intel. ... CPU can stand for: in computing: Central processing unit in journalism: Commonwealth Press Union in law enforcement: Crime prevention unit in software: Critical patch update, a type of software patch distributed by Oracle Corporation in Macleans College is often known as Ash Lim. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with X86 assembly language. ... A computer program is a collection of instructions that describe a task, or set of tasks, to be carried out by a computer. ... Theory of value is a generic term which encompasses all the theories within economics that explain the exchange value or price of goods and services. ... Application software is a subclass of computer software that employs the capabilities of a computer directly and thoroughly to a task that the user wishes to perform. ... This computer/video game related article needs cleanup. ... Video compression refers to making a digital video signal use less data, without noticeably reducing the quality of the picture. ... The term video editing can refer to: non-linear editing system, using computers with video editing software linear video editing, using videotape Video editing is the process of re-arranging or modifying segments of video to form another piece of video. ... Solid modeling (or modelling) is the unambiguous representation of the solid parts of an object, that is, models of solid objects suitable for computer processing. ... CADD and CAD redirect here. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... This article is about the scientific discipline of computer graphics. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... A rapid prototyping machine using Selective laser sintering. ... Product Visualization involves visualization software technology for the viewing and manipulation of 3D models, technical drawing and other related documentation of manufactured components and large assemblies of products. ... Visualization can refer to: Graphic Visualization as in any technique for creating images, diagrams, or animations to communicate any message. ...


Introduced in April 1998,[2] the first Celeron branded CPU was based on the Pentium II branded core. Subsequent Celeron branded CPUs were based on the Pentium III, Pentium 4, Pentium M, and Core 2 Duo branded processors. The latest Celeron design (as of January 2008) is based on the Core 2 Duo (Allendale). This design features independent processing cores (CPUs), but with only half as much cache memory as the comparable Core 2 Duo offering. Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Intel Pentium II Logo The Pentium II is an x86 architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on May 7, 1997. ... Pentium III logo The Pentium III is an x86 (more precisely, an i686) architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on February 26, 1999. ... The Pentium 4[1] brand refers to Intels single-core mainstream desktop and laptop CPUs introduced on November 20, 2000[2] (August 8, 2008 is the date of last shipments of Pentium 4s[3]). They had the 7th-generation architecture - called NetBurst - which was the companys first all... Introduced in March 2003, the Pentium M is an x86 architecture microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel. ... The Core 2 brand refers to a range of Intels consumer 64-bit dual-core and MCM quad-core CPUs with the x86-64 instruction set, and based on the Intel Core microarchitecture, which derived from the 32-bit dual-core Yonah laptop processor. ... Core 2 Duo brand logo Core 2 Extreme brand logo Core 2 is an eighth-generation x86 architecture microprocessor produced by Intel based on an all-new CPU architecture called the Intel Core Microarchitecture, which is the successor of NetBurst microarchitecture that has powered most Intel processors since 2000. ...

Contents

Background

As a product concept, the Celeron was introduced in response to Intel's loss of the low-end market, in particular to Cyrix's 6x86, AMD's K6, and IDT Winchip. Intel's existing low-end product, the Pentium MMX, was no longer performance competitive at 233 MHz.[3] Although a faster Pentium MMX would have been a lower-risk strategy, the industry standard Socket 7 platform hosted a market of competitor CPUs which could be drop-in replacements for the Pentium MMX. Instead, Intel pursued a budget part that was pin-compatible with their high-end Pentium II product, using the Pentium II's (Slot 1) interface. The Celeron was used in many low end machines and, in some ways, became the standard for non gaming computers. Market share, in strategic management and marketing, is the percentage or proportion of the total available market or market segment that is being serviced by a company. ... Cyrix was a CPU manufacturer that began in 1988 in Richardson, TX as a specialist supplier of high-performance math co-processors for 286 and 386 systems. ... The Cyrix 6x86 is a sixth-generation, 32-bit 80x86_compatible microprocessor designed by Cyrix and manufactured by IBM and SGS_Thomson. ... Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. ... History 1997 saw the arrival of AMDs K6 microprocessor. ... IDT was founded in 1980 as a semiconductor vendor. ... The WinChip series was a a low-power Socket 7-based x86 processor designed by Centaur Technology and marketed by its parent company IDT. // The design of the WinChip was quite different from other processors of the time. ... Pentium MMX - top view The Pentium is a fifth-generation x86 architecture microprocessor by Intel which first shipped on March 22, 1993. ... Socket 7 is a physical and electrical specification for an x86-style CPU socket on a personal computer motherboard. ... Intel Pentium II Logo The Pentium II is an x86 architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on May 7, 1997. ... Slot 1 refers to the physical and electrical specification for the connector used by some of Intels microprocessors, including the Celeron, Pentium II and the Pentium III. Slot 1 was a departure from the square ZIF PGA/SPGA sockets used for the Pentium and earlier processors. ...

Intel Celeron processor family
Original Logo New Logo Desktop Laptop
Code-named Core Date released Code-named Core Date released
New logo as of 2006 Covington
Mendocino
Coppermine
Tualatin
Willamette
Northwood
(250nm)
(250nm)
(180nm)
(130nm)
(180nm)
(130nm)
Apr 1998
Aug 1998
Mar 2000
Oct 2001
May 2002
Sep 2002
Yonah-512
Merom-L
Socket P
solo (65nm)
solo (65nm)
Apr 2006
Jan 2007
Original Celeron M logo New logo as of 2006 Mendocino
Coppermine
Tualatin
Northwood
Banias
Dothan
Yonah
Merom
(250nm)
(180nm)
(130nm)
(130nm)
(130nm)
(90nm)
solo (65nm)
solo (65nm)
Jan 1999
Feb 2000
Apr 2002
Jun 2002
Jan 2004
Aug 2004
Apr 2006
Jan 2007
Original Celeron D logo Prescott
Cedar Mill
Conroe
(90nm)
P4 (65nm)
solo (65nm)
Jun 2004
May 2006
Jun 2007
New logo as 2008 Allendale dual (65nm) Jan 2008 Penryn dual (45nm) May 2008*
* Date to be confirmed
List of Intel Celeron microprocessors

Image File history File links Celeron. ... . ...

Celeron (P6)

Covington

The first Celeron (codenamed Covington) was essentially a 266 MHz Deschutes Pentium II manufactured without any secondary cache at all.[4] Covington also shared the 80523 product code of Deschutes. Although clocked at 266 or 300 MHz (frequencies 33 or 66 MHz higher than the desktop version of the Pentium w/MMX), the cacheless Celerons were a good deal slower than the parts they were designed to replace.[3] Substantial numbers were sold on first release, largely on the strength of the Intel name, but the Celeron quickly achieved a poor reputation both in the trade press and among computer professionals.[5] The initial market interest faded rapidly in the face of its poor performance and with sales at a very low level, Intel felt obliged to develop a substantially faster replacement as soon as possible. Nevertheless the first Celerons were quite popular among some overclockers, for their flexible overclockability and reasonable price.[3] Covington was only manufactured in slot 1 SEPP format. Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... AMD Athlon XP Overclocking BIOS Setup on ABIT NF7-S. FSB frequency (External clock) has increased from 133 MHz to 148 MHz, and clock multiplier factor has changed from 13. ... Slot 1 refers to the physical and electrical specification for the connector used by some of Intels microprocessors, including the Celeron, Pentium II and the Pentium III. Slot 1 was a departure from the square ZIF PGA/SPGA sockets used for the Pentium and earlier processors. ...


Mendocino

Celeron 300A (SEPP package)
Celeron 300A (SEPP package)
Top of a Mendocino-core Socket 370 Celeron (PPGA package)
Top of a Mendocino-core Socket 370 Celeron (PPGA package)
Underside of a Mendocino-core Socket 370 Celeron.

The Mendocino Celeron, launched 24 August 1998, was the first mass-market CPU to use on-die L2 cache.[6] Whereas Covington had no secondary cache at all, Mendocino included 128 KiB of L2 cache running at full clock speed. The first Mendocino-core Celeron was clocked at a then-modest 300 MHz but offered almost twice the performance of the old cacheless Covington Celeron at the same clock speed. To distinguish it from the older Covington 300 MHz, Intel called the Mendocino core Celeron 300A.[6] Although the other Mendocino Celerons (the 333 MHz part, for example) did not have an "A" appended, some people call all Mendocino processors "Celeron-A" regardless of speed. Download high resolution version (1350x600, 286 KB)Celeron 300A Image taken by MaXim File links The following pages link to this file: Celeron Categories: GPL images ... Download high resolution version (1350x600, 286 KB)Celeron 300A Image taken by MaXim File links The following pages link to this file: Celeron Categories: GPL images ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (766x734, 130 KB) Summary Top of a 366MHz Socket 370 Celeron-A. Photograph taken by me on Saturday, January 21, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (766x734, 130 KB) Summary Top of a 366MHz Socket 370 Celeron-A. Photograph taken by me on Saturday, January 21, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (744x721, 158 KB) Summary Backside of a 366MHz Socket 370 Celeron-A. Photograph taken by me on Saturday, January 21, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (744x721, 158 KB) Summary Backside of a 366MHz Socket 370 Celeron-A. Photograph taken by me on Saturday, January 21, 2006. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The term L2 may refer to The Level-2 CPU cache in a computer The second lumbar vertebra in Human anatomy The second Lagrange Point in an astronomical Solar System This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A kilobyte (derived from the SI prefix kilo-, meaning 1,000) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to either 1,000 bytes or 1,024 bytes (210), depending on context. ...


The new Mendocino core Celeron was a good performer from the outset. Indeed, most industry analysts regarded the first Mendocino-based Celerons as too successful—performance was sufficiently high to not only compete strongly with rival parts, but also to attract buyers away from Intel's high-profit flagship, the Pentium II. Overclockers soon discovered that, given a high-end motherboard, the Celeron 300A could run reliably at 450 MHz. This was achieved by simply increasing the Front Side Bus (FSB) speed from the stock 66 MHz to the 100 MHz spec of the Pentium II. At this speed, the Mendocino Celeron rivaled the fastest x86 processors available.[6] AMD Athlon XP Overclocking BIOS Setup on ABIT NF7-S. FSB frequency (External clock) has increased from 133 MHz to 148 MHz, and clock multiplier factor has changed from 13. ... A motherboard is the central or primary circuit board making up a complex electronic system, such as a modern computer. ... A typical north/southbridge layout In personal computers, the Front Side Bus (FSB) is the data transfer bus that carries information between the CPU and the northbridge of the Motherboard. ... Intel Pentium II Logo The Pentium II is an x86 architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on May 7, 1997. ...


At the time on-die cache was difficult to manufacture; especially L2 as more of it is needed to attain an adequate level of performance. A benefit of on-die cache is that it operates at the same clock frequency as the CPU. All other Intel CPUs at that time used motherboard mounted or slot mounted secondary L2 cache, which was very easy to manufacture, cheap, and simple to enlarge to any desired size (typical cache sizes were 512 KiB or 1 MiB), but they carried the performance penalty of slower cache speed, typically running at FSB speed (60 to 100 MHz) for motherboard mounted L2 cache. The implementation of the Pentium II's 512 KiB of L2 cache was unique at the time (and later copied by AMD's Athlon), comprising moderately high-speed L2 cache chips mounted on a special-purpose board alongside the processor itself, running at half processor speed and communicating with the CPU through a special backside bus. This method of cache placement was expensive and imposed practical cache-size limits, but allowed the Pentium II to be clocked faster and avoided front side bus RAM/L2 cache contention typical with motherboard-placed L2 cache configurations.[7] The term L2 may refer to The Level-2 CPU cache in a computer The second lumbar vertebra in Human anatomy The second Lagrange Point in an astronomical Solar System This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The term L2 may refer to The Level-2 CPU cache in a computer The second lumbar vertebra in Human anatomy The second Lagrange Point in an astronomical Solar System This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The term backside bus was used most commonly when referring to Intels Pentium Pro. ... A typical north/southbridge layout In personal computers, the Front Side Bus (FSB) is the data transfer bus that carries information between the CPU and the northbridge of the Motherboard. ...


Over time, newer Mendocino processors were released at 333, 366, 400, 433, 466, 500, and 533 MHz. The "Mendocino" Celeron CPU came only designed for a 66 MHz frontside bus, but this would not be a serious performance bottleneck until clock speeds reached higher levels.


The Mendocino Celerons also introduced new packaging. When the Mendocinos debuted they came in both a Slot 1 SEPP and Socket 370 PPGA package. The Slot 1 form had been designed to accommodate the off-chip cache of the Pentium II and had mounting problems with motherboards. Because all Celerons are a single-chip design, however, there was no reason to retain the slot packaging for L2 cache storage, and Intel discontinued the Slot 1 variant: beginning with the 466 MHz part, only the PPGA Socket 370 form was offered. (Third-party manufacturers made motherboard slot-to-socket adapters (nicknamed Slotkets) available for a few dollars, which allowed, for example, a Celeron 500 to be fitted to a Slot 1 motherboard.) One interesting note about the PPGA Socket 370 Mendocinos is that SMP (symmetric multiprocessing) mode was available, and there was at least one motherboard released (the ABIT BP6) which took advantage of this fact. Socket 370 is a common format of CPU socket first used by Intel for Celeron processors to replace the older Slot 1 CPU interface on personal computers. ... Package Diagram for 168-Pin PGA Embedded IntelDX2™ Processor The pin grid array or PGA is a type of packaging used for integrated circuits, particularly microprocessors. ... Slotket adapter In computer hardware terminology, slotkets, also known as slockets, (both short for slot to socket adapter) are adapters that allow socket based microprocessors to be used on slot based motherboards. ... Symmetric multiprocessing, or SMP, is a multiprocessor computer architecture where two or more identical processors are connected to a single shared main memory. ... The ABIT BP6 (introduced in 1999) was the first motherboard to allow for the use of (affordable) Intel Celeron processors in Symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) configuration. ...


The Mendocino also came in a mobile variant, with speeds from 266, 300, 333, 366, 400, 433, and 466, 500, 533, 566, 600 MHz.


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Mendocino CPUs are family 6, model 6 and their Intel product code is 80524. These identifiers are shared with the related Dixon Mobile Pentium II variant.


Coppermine-128

Celeron Coppermine 128 with 600 MHz (FC-PGA package)
Celeron Coppermine 128 with 600 MHz (FC-PGA package)
Backside of a Celeron Coppermine 128, 600 MHz
Backside of a Celeron Coppermine 128, 600 MHz

The next generation Celeron was the Coppermine-128 (sometimes known as the "Celeron II"). These were a derivative of Intel's Coppermine Pentium III and were released on March 29, 2000.[8] Like the Mendocino, the Celeron-128 used 128 KiB of on-chip L2 cache and was (initially) restricted to a 66 MHz bus speed, but the big news was the addition of SSE instructions, due to the new Coppermine core. Other than half the L2 cache (128 KiB instead of 256 KiB) and a slower FSB (66 to 100 MHz instead of 100 to 133 MHz), the Coppermine Celeron was identical to the Coppermine Pentium III. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x795, 231 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x795, 231 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Flip Chip Pin Grid Array - (FC-PGA) The package of certain Intel Celeron, Pentium III, and Pentium 4 processors. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Coppermine is a type of microprocessor, a particular version of the Pentium III, made by Intel. ... Pentium III logo The Pentium III is an x86 (more precisely, an i686) architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on February 26, 1999. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... SSE (Streaming SIMD Extensions, originally called ISSE, Internet Streaming SIMD Extensions) is a SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data) instruction set designed by Intel and introduced in 1999 in their Pentium III series processors as a reply to AMDs 3DNow! (which had debuted a year earlier). ...


All Coppermine-128s were produced in the same FCPGA Socket 370 format that most Coppermine Pentium III CPUs used. These Celeron processors began at 533 MHz and continued through 566, 600, 633, 666, 700, 733, and 766 MHz. Because of the limitations of the 66 MHz bus, there were diminishing returns on performance as clock rate increased. On January 3, 2001, Intel switched to a 100 MHz bus with the launch of the 800 MHz Celeron, resulting in a significant performance-per-clock improvement.[9] All Celeron-128 CPUs from 800 MHz and faster use the 100 MHz front side bus. Various models were made at 800, 850, 900, 950, 1000, and 1100 MHz. Package Diagram for 168-Pin PGA Embedded IntelDX2™ Processor The pin grid array or PGA is a type of packaging used for integrated circuits, particularly microprocessors. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Coppermine Celerons and Pentium IIIs are family 6, model 8 and their Intel product code is 80526.


Tualatin-256

A Tualatin core Celeron 1200 MHz (Tualeron) (FC-PGA2 package)
A Tualatin core Celeron 1200 MHz (Tualeron) (FC-PGA2 package)

These Celeron processors, released initially at 1200 MHz (1.2 GHz) on October 2, 2001,[10] were based on Pentium III Tualatin core and made with a 0.13 micrometer process for the FCPGA2 socket 370 . They were nicknamed "Tualeron" — a portmanteau of the words Tualatin and Celeron. Some software and users refer to the chips as "Celeron-S", referring to the chip's lineage with the Pentium III-S, but this is not an official designation. Intel later released 1000 MHz and 1100 MHz parts (which were given the extension "A" to their name to differentiate them from the Coppermine-128 of the same speed they replaced).[11] A 1,300 MHz chip, launched January 4, 2002,[12] and finally a 1,400 MHz chip, launched May 15, 2002 (the same day as the Netburst Willamette 1.7 GHz Celeron launch),[13] marked the end of the Tualatin-256 line. Image File history File links Tualeron_1200. ... Image File history File links Tualeron_1200. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Package Diagram for 168-Pin PGA Embedded IntelDX2™ Processor The pin grid array or PGA is a type of packaging used for integrated circuits, particularly microprocessors. ... Pentium III logo The Pentium III is an x86 (more precisely, an i686) architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on February 26, 1999. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


With regards to core functionality, Tualatin-256 was again quite similar to its Pentium III sibling. The most significant differences were a slower 100 MHz bus and only 256 KiB of L2 cache (whereas the Pentium III had either 256 KiB or 512 KiB of L2 cache). Furthermore, the Tualeron's L2 cache had a higher latency which boosted manufacturing yields for this budget CPU.


Despite offering much improved performance over the Coppermine Celeron it superseded, the Tualatin Celeron still suffered stiff competition from AMD's Duron budget processor.[14] Intel later responded by releasing the Netburst Willamette Celeron, and for some time Tualatin Celerons were manufactured and sold in parallel with their replacement Pentium 4-based Celerons. The AMD Duron was an x86-compatible computer processor manufactured by AMD. It was released on June 19, 2000 as a low-cost alternative to AMDs own Athlon processor and the Pentium III and Celeron processor lines from rival Intel. ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Tualatin Celerons and Pentium IIIs are family 6, model 11 and their Intel product code is 80530.


Celeron (NetBurst)

The Intel NetBurst Microarchitecture, called P68 inside Intel, was the successor to the P6 microarchitecture in the x86 family of CPUs made by Intel. ...

Willamette-128

These Celerons were for socket 478 and were based on the Willamette Pentium 4 core, being a completely different design compared to the previous Tualatin Celeron. These are often known as the "Celeron 4". Their L2 cache (128 KiB) is half that of the Pentium 4 Willamette's 256 KiB of L2 cache, but otherwise the two are very similar. With the transition to the Pentium 4 core the Celeron now featured SSE2 instructions. The ability to share the same socket as the Pentium 4 meant that the Celeron now had the option to use RDRAM, DDR SDRAM, or traditional SDRAM. Willamette Celerons were launched May 15, 2002, initially at 1.7 GHz, and offered a noticeable performance improvement over the older Tualatin Celeron 1.3 GHz part, being able to finally beat the Duron 1.3 GHz, which at the time was AMD's top competing budget processor.[15] On June 12, 2002, Intel launched the last Willamette Celeron, a 1.8 GHz model.[16] The Pentium 4[1] brand refers to Intels single-core mainstream desktop and laptop CPUs introduced on November 20, 2000[2] (August 8, 2008 is the date of last shipments of Pentium 4s[3]). They had the 7th-generation architecture - called NetBurst - which was the companys first all... The Pentium 4[1] brand refers to Intels single-core mainstream desktop and laptop CPUs introduced on November 20, 2000[2] (August 8, 2008 is the date of last shipments of Pentium 4s[3]). They had the 7th-generation architecture - called NetBurst - which was the companys first all... Direct Rambus DRAM or DRDRAM (sometimes just called Rambus DRAM or RDRAM) is a type of synchronous dynamic RAM, designed by the Rambus Corporation. ... DDR SDRAM or double-data-rate synchronous dynamic random access memory is a type of memory integrated circuit used in computers. ... SDRAM means synchronous dynamic random access memory which is a type of solid state computer memory. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Willamette Celerons and Pentium 4s are family 15, model 1, and their Intel product code is 80531.


Northwood-128

These socket 478 Celerons are based on the Northwood Pentium 4 core, and also have 128 KiB of L2 cache. The only difference between the Northwood-128 and the Willamette-128 Celeron is the fact that it was built on the new 0.13 micrometre process which shrunk the die size, increased the transistor count, and lowered the core voltage from 1.7 V on the Willamette-128 to 1.52 V for the Northwood-128. Despite these differences, they are functionally the same as the Willamette-128 Celeron, and perform largely the same clock-for-clock. The Northwood-128 family of processors were initially released as a 2.0 GHz Model (a 1.9 GHz model was announced earlier, but never launched[17]) on September 18, 2002.[18] Since that time Intel has released at total of 10 different speed grades ranging from 1.8 GHz to 2.8 GHz, before being surpassed by the Celeron D. Although the Northwood Celerons suffer considerably from their small L2 cache, some speed grades have been favored in the enthusiast market, because like the old 300A, they can run well above their rated speeds.[19] The Pentium 4[1] brand refers to Intels single-core mainstream desktop and laptop CPUs introduced on November 20, 2000[2] (August 8, 2008 is the date of last shipments of Pentium 4s[3]). They had the 7th-generation architecture - called NetBurst - which was the companys first all... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Northwood Celerons and Pentium 4s are family 15, model 2, and their Intel product code is 80532.


Celeron D

Prescott-256

Prescott-256 Celeron D processors, initially launched June 25, 2004,[20] feature double the L1 cache (16 KiB) and L2 cache (256 KiB) as compared to the previous Willamette and Northwood desktop Celerons, by virtue of being based on the Prescott Pentium 4 core.[21] It also features a 533 MT/s bus and SSE3, and a 3xx model number (compared to 5xx for Pentium 4s and 7xx for Pentium Ms). The Prescott-256 Celeron D was manufactured for socket 478 as well LGA 775, and they were released carrying model numbers of 355 (3.33 GHz), 350 (3.2 GHz), 345 (3.06 GHz) 340 (2.93 GHz), 335 (2.80 GHz), 330 (2.66 GHz), 325 (2.53 GHz), 320 (2.40 GHz), 315 (2.26 GHz), and 310 (2.13 GHz). They also have hardware-level support of Intel's Intel 64 technology by virtue of it also being built into the Prescott core, although the feature is disabled in all 3x0/3x5 models (with the exception of the Celeron D model 355). It has been activated in all 3x1 and 3x6 models. The Intel Celeron D processor works with the Intel 845 and 865 chipset families. It should be noted that the "D" suffix actually has no official designation. It is used simply to distinguish this line of Celeron from the previous, lower performing Northwood and Willamette series, and also from the mobile series, the Celeron M.[22] It should also be stated that unlike the Pentium D, the Celeron D is not a dual core processor. is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pentium 4[1] brand refers to Intels single-core mainstream desktop and laptop CPUs introduced on November 20, 2000[2] (August 8, 2008 is the date of last shipments of Pentium 4s[3]). They had the 7th-generation architecture - called NetBurst - which was the companys first all... SSE3, also known by its Intel code name Prescott New Instructions (PNI), is the third iteration of the SSE instruction set for the IA-32 architecture. ... In computing, Socket 478 is a type of CPU socket used for Intels Pentium 4 and Celeron series CPUs. ... Intels latest Socket for a processor is Socket T, or, LGA 775. ... x86-64 is a 64-bit microprocessor architecture and corresponding instruction set; it is a superset of the Intel x86 architecture, which it natively supports. ... Pentium D logo as of 2006. ...


The Celeron D was a major performance improvement over previous Netburst Celerons. A test using a variety of applications, run by Derek Wilson at Anandtech.com, showed that the new Celeron D architecture alone offered up performance improvements on average of >10% over a Northwood Celeron when both CPUs were run at the same bus and clock speed.[23] The addition of SSE 3 instructions and the higher FSB only added to this already impressive gain.


Despite its many improvements, the Prescott core of the Celeron D had at least one major drawback: heat. Unlike the fairly cool running Northwood Celeron, the Prescott-256 had a class-rated TDP of 73 watts, which prompted Intel to include a more intricate copper core/aluminum finned cooler to help handle the additional heat.[24]


In mid-2005, Intel refreshed the Celeron D with Intel 64 and XD Bit (eXecute Disable) enabled. Model numbers increase by 1 over the previous generation (e.g. 330 became 331). This only applied to LGA 775 Celeron Ds. There is no Socket 478 CPU with 64-bit or XD Bit capabilities. x86-64 is a 64-bit microprocessor architecture and corresponding instruction set; it is a superset of the Intel x86 architecture, which it natively supports. ... NX stands for No eXecute. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Prescott Celeron Ds and Pentium 4s are family 15, model 3 (up to stepping E0) or 4 (stepping E0 onwards), and their Intel product code is 80546 or 80547, depending on socket type.


Cedar Mill-512

Based on the Cedar Mill Pentium 4 core, this version of the Celeron D was launched May 28, 2006,and continued the 3xx naming scheme with the Celeron D 347 (3.06 GHz), 352 (3.2 GHz), 356 (3.33 GHz), 360 (3.46 GHz), and 365 (3.6GHz). The Cedar Mill Celeron D is largely the same as the Prescott-256, except with double the L2 cache (512KB) and based on a 65nm manufacturing process. The Cedar Mill-512 Celeron D is LGA 775 exclusive. The main benefits of the Cedar Mill Celerons over the Prescott Celerons are the slightly increased performance due to the larger L2 cache, higher clock speeds, and less heat dissipation, with several models having a TDP lowered to 65 watts from Prescott's lowest offering of 73W.[25] is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Cedar Mill Celeron Ds and Pentium 4s are family 15, model 6, and their Intel product code is 80552.


Celeron (Core)

The Intel Core microarchitecture (previously known as the Intel Next-Generation Micro-Architecture, or NGMA) is a multi-core processor microarchitecture unveiled by Intel in Q1 2006. ...

Conroe-L

The Conroe-L Celeron is a single-core processor built on the Intel Core microarchitecture and is thus clocked much lower than the Cedar Mill Celerons, but still outperforms them. It is based on the 65 nm Conroe-L core,[26] and uses a 400-series model number sequence.[27] The FSB was increased to 800 MHz from 533 MHz in this generation, and the TDP was decreased from 65W to 35W. As is traditional with Celerons, it does not have Intel VT-x instruction support or SpeedStep. All Conroe-L models are single-core processors for the value segment of the market, much like the AMD K8-based Sempron. The product line was launched on June 5, 2007.[28] The Intel Core microarchitecture (previously known as the Intel Next-Generation Micro-Architecture, or NGMA) is a multi-core processor microarchitecture unveiled by Intel in Q1 2006. ... The Core 2 brand refers to a range of Intels consumer 64-bit dual-core and MCM quad-core CPUs with the x86-64 instruction set, and based on the Intel Core microarchitecture, which derived from the 32-bit dual-core Yonah laptop processor. ... x86 virtualization is the method by which x86-based guest operating systems are run under another host x86 operating system, with little or no modification of the guest OS. The x86 processor architecture did not originally meet the Popek and Goldberg virtualization requirements. ... SpeedStep has lowered this Pentium 4s Clock Speed from 3Ghz to 2. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On October 21, 2007, Intel presented a new processor for its Intel Essential Series. The full name of the processor is a Celeron 220 and is soldered on the D201GLY2 motherboard. With 1.2 GHz and a 512KB second level cache it has a TDP of 19 Watt and can be cooled passively. The Celeron 220 is the successor of the Celeron 215 which is based on a Yonah core and used on the D201GLY motherboard. This processor is exclusively used on the mini-ITX boards targeted to the sub-value market segment.

Celeron Models launched on June 5, 2007 (with list prices per unit, for 1,000 units)
Model Clock rate FSB speed L2 cache Price Thermal diode and

Enhanced HALT state is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical north/southbridge layout In personal computers, the Front Side Bus (FSB) is the data transfer bus that carries information between the CPU and the northbridge of the Motherboard. ... Diagram of a CPU memory cache A CPU cache is a cache used by the central processing unit of a computer to reduce the average time to access memory. ...

Celeron 220 1.2 GHz 133 MHz QDR 512 KiB US$58 Enabled
Celeron 420 1.6 GHz 200 MHz QDR 512 KiB US$39 Enabled
Celeron 430 1.8 GHz 200 MHz QDR 512 KiB US$49 Disabled
Celeron 440 2.0 GHz 200 MHz QDR 512 KiB US$59 Disabled

Celeron 220 and 420 are the only single-core Conroe-L Celerons that have their Thermal diode and Extended(Enhanced) HALT State enabled. In Enhanced HALT State the Celeron 420 consumes 8W compared to the 35W of its normal operation. Those are disabled on Celeron 430 and Celeron 440. This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... Pumping, when referring to computer systems, is simply how many times per clock cycle data is being transmitted. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... USD redirects here. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... Pumping, when referring to computer systems, is simply how many times per clock cycle data is being transmitted. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... USD redirects here. ...


Celeron Dual-Core (Core)

The Intel Core microarchitecture (previously known as the Intel Next-Generation Micro-Architecture, or NGMA) is a multi-core processor microarchitecture unveiled by Intel in Q1 2006. ...

Allendale-512

Intel launched the new dual core Celeron E1200 processor on January 20, 2008, based on the Allendale-512 core. The CPU has 512KiB L2 cache, 800MT/s FSB, 1.6GHz Clock Speed and 65W TDP. New features to the Celeron family included full enhanced halt state and enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology. Several future models are planned, up to the 2.4GHz E1600. At present, the Celeron Dual-Core E1200 retails for only $11 less than the Pentium Dual-Core E2140 clocked at the same speed but with 1MiB L2 cache, however the price should drop as production gears up. The new Celerons will run in any motherboard that supports current Core 2 Duo family processors.[29] SpeedStep has lowered this Pentium 4s Clock Speed from 3Ghz to 2. ... The new Pentium Dual-Core logo The Pentium Dual-Core brand refers to lower-end microprocessors (CPU) from Intel with 1 MB of cache and the 64-bit Allendale core or 32-bit Yonah core belonging to the eighth or P-M (Intel P6 mobile) generation of x86 architecture respectively. ...

Celeron Models launched on January 20, 2008 (with list prices per unit, for 1,000 units)
Model Clock rate FSB speed L2 cache Price
Celeron E1200 1.6 GHz 200 MHz QDR 512KiB US$53

is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical north/southbridge layout In personal computers, the Front Side Bus (FSB) is the data transfer bus that carries information between the CPU and the northbridge of the Motherboard. ... Diagram of a CPU memory cache A CPU cache is a cache used by the central processing unit of a computer to reduce the average time to access memory. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... Pumping, when referring to computer systems, is simply how many times per clock cycle data is being transmitted. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... USD redirects here. ...

Mobile Celeron and Celeron M

Tualatin-256

These were the first Mobile Celerons, based on the Tualatin core. These differed from their desktop counterparts in that the Mobile series were offered in both 100 MHz and 133 MHz FSB. Like the desktop Tualatins, these chips had 256KB of L2 cache.


Northwood-256

These are the Mobile Celeron range used in laptops. Also based on the Northwood core, they feature a 256 KiB L2 Cache. These Celeron processors were a good deal faster than the desktop counterparts because of their larger L2 cache sizes.[30] They were eventually replaced by the Celeron M brand which is built around the Pentium M processor design.


Banias-512

This Celeron (sold under the Celeron M brand) is based on the Banias Pentium M, and differs from its parent in that it has half the L2 cache, and does not support the clock-varying SpeedStep technology. It performs reasonably well compared to the Pentium M, but battery life is noticeably shorter on a Celeron M–based notebook than it is on a comparable Pentium M notebook. Introduced in March 2003, the Pentium M is an x86 architecture microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel. ... SpeedStep has lowered this Pentium 4s Clock Speed from 3Ghz to 2. ...


A system based on the Celeron M processor may not use the Centrino brand name, regardless of what chipset and Wi-Fi components are used. Components of the Centrino platform. ... Diagram of a motherboard chipset A chipset is a group of integrated circuits, or chips, that are designed to work together, and are usually marketed as a single product. ... Official Wi-Fi logo Wi-Fi (pronounced wye-fye, IPA: ) is a wireless technology brand owned by the Wi-Fi Alliance intended to improve the interoperability of wireless local area network products based on the IEEE 802. ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Banias Celeron Ms and Pentium Ms are family 6, model 9 and their Intel product code is 80535.


Shelton

The Shelton core is a Banias core without any L2 cache, and without SpeedStep. It is used in Intel's small form factor D845GVSH motherboard, intended for Asian and South American markets. The processor identifies itself as a "Intel Celeron 1.0B GHz", to differentiate it from the previous Coppermine-128 and "Tualeron" 1.0 GHz processors. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A gigahertz is a billion hertz or a thousand megahertz, a measure of frequency. ...


Dothan-1024

A 90 nm Celeron M with half of the L2 cache of the 90 nm Dothan Pentium Ms (twice the L2 cache of the 130nm Celeron Ms, though), and, like its predecessor, lacking SpeedStep. The first Celeron Ms that supports the XD bit was released in January 2005, in general any Celeron M released after that supports the XD bit. There is also a 512 kib low voltage version which is used in the Asus EEE PC. NX stands for No eXecute. ... NX stands for No eXecute. ...


In Intel's "Family/Model/Stepping" scheme, Dothan Celeron Ms and Pentium Ms are family 6, model 13 and their Intel product code is 80536.


Yonah-1024

The Celeron M 400-series is a 65 nm Celeron M based on the single-core Yonah Core Solo CPU. Like its predecessors in the Celeron M series, this Celeron M has half of the L2 cache (1 MiB) of Core Solo and lacks SpeedStep. This core also brings new features to Celeron M including a faster front side bus (533 MT/s), SSE3 instructions. September 2006 and January 4, 2008 mark a discontinuation of many Celeron M branded CPUs.[31] This article is about the Intel mobile processor family. ... SSE3, also known by its Intel code name Prescott New Instructions (PNI), is the third iteration of the SSE instruction set for the IA-32 architecture. ...


Merom-1024

The Celeron M 520 (1.6 GHz), 530 (1.73 GHz), 540 (1.86 GHz) and 550 (2.0 GHz) are single-core 65 nm CPUs based on the Merom Core 2 architecture. They feature a 533 MHz FSB, 1 MiB of L2 cache (half that of the low end Core 2 Duo's 2 MiB cache), XD-bit support, and Intel 64 technology, but lack SpeedStep and Virtualization Technology. January 4, 2008 marked the discontinuation of Merom-1024 CPUs.[31] Core 2 Duo brand logo This article is about Intel processors branded as Intel Core 2. ... SpeedStep has lowered this Pentium 4s Clock Speed from 3Ghz to 2. ... x86 virtualization is the method by which x86-based guest operating systems are run under another host x86 operating system, with little or no modification of the guest OS. The x86 processor architecture did not originally meet the Popek and Goldberg virtualization requirements. ...


See also

. ... The Celeron is a family of microprocessors from Intel targeted at the low-end consumer market. ...

References

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TomsHardware. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TomsHardware. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... EE Times is an electronics industry newspaper with several decades of history. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TomsHardware. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anand Lal Shimpi was born June 26, 1982 to Indian and Iranian parents. ... AnandTech. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TomsHardware. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TomsHardware. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TomsHardware. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AnandTech. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AnandTech. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tech Report is a web site dedicated to covering the latest trends in computer hardware, technology, and gaming. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... DailyTech is an online daily publication of technology news, founded by ex-AnandTech editor Kristopher Kubicki on January 1, 2006. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Heinz Heise is a German publishing house. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Intel redirects here. ... This generational and chronological list of Intel microprocessors attempts to present all of Intels processors from the pioneering 4-bit 4004 (1971) to the present high-end offerings, the 64-bit Itanium 2 (2002) and Intel Core 2 and Xeon 5100 and 7100 series processors (2006). ... The Intel 4004 is a 4-bit central processing unit (CPU) released by Intel Corporation in 1971. ... Intel D4040 Microprocessor The Intel 4040 microprocessor was the successor to the Intel 4004. ... Intel 8008 The Intel 8008 was an early microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel and introduced in April, 1972. ... AMD clone NEC 8080AF (2nd-source). ... The Intel 8085 was an 8-bit microprocessor made by Intel in the mid-1970s. ... The Intel iAPX 432 was Intels first 32-bit microprocessor design, introduced in 1981 as a set of three integrated circuits. ... The Intel i860 (also 80860, and code named N10) was a RISC microprocessor from Intel, first released in 1989. ... Intels i960 (or 80960) was a RISC-based microprocessor design that became popular during the early 1990s as an embedded microcontroller, becoming a best-selling CPU in that field, along with the competing AMD 29000. ... The 8086[1] is a 16-bit microprocessor chip designed by Intel in 1978, which gave rise to the x86 architecture. ... The Intel 8088 is an Intel microprocessor based on the 8086, with 16-bit registers and an 8-bit external data bus. ... An Intel 80186 Microprocessor The 80186 architecture. ... The Intel 80188 is a version of the Intel 80186 microprocessor with an 8 bit external data bus, instead of 16 bit. ... AMD 80286 at 12 MHz. ... The Intel386[1] is a microprocessor which was used as the central processing unit (CPU) of many personal computers from 1986 until 2007. ... The Intel486[1] brand refers to Intels family of i486 (incl. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Pentium Pro is a sixth-generation x86 architecture microprocessor (P6 core) produced by Intel and was originally intended to replace the original Pentium in a full range of applications, but later, was reduced to a more narrow role as a server and high-end desktop chip. ... Intel Pentium II Logo The Pentium II is an x86 architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on May 7, 1997. ... Pentium III logo The Pentium III is an x86 (more precisely, an i686) architecture microprocessor by Intel, introduced on February 26, 1999. ... 2007 Itanium logo Itanium is the brand name for 64-bit Intel microprocessors that implement the Intel Itanium architecture (formerly called IA-64). ... Pentium D logo as of 2006. ... Introduced in March 2003, the Pentium M is an x86 architecture microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel. ... Pentium D logo as of 2006. ... The Pentium 4[1] brand refers to Intels single-core mainstream desktop and laptop CPUs introduced on November 20, 2000[2] (August 8, 2008 is the date of last shipments of Pentium 4s[3]). They had the 7th-generation architecture - called NetBurst - which was the companys first all... This article is about the Intel mobile processor family. ... The new Pentium Dual-Core logo The Pentium Dual-Core brand refers to lower-end x86-architecture microprocessors from Intel. ... The Core 2 brand refers to a range of Intels consumer 64-bit dual-core and MCM quad-core CPUs with the x86-64 instruction set, and based on the Intel Core microarchitecture, which derived from the 32-bit dual-core Yonah laptop processor. ... This article is about the Intel microprocessor. ... The XScale, a microprocessor core, is Marvells (formerly Intels) implementation of the 5th generation of the ARM architecture, and consists of several distinct families: IXP, IXC, IOP, PXA and CE (see more below). ... 2007 Itanium logo Itanium is the brand name for 64-bit Intel microprocessors that implement the Intel Itanium architecture (formerly called IA-64). ... The Socket 370 processor socket, a ZIF type PGA socket A CPU socket or CPU slot is a connector on a computers motherboard that accepts a CPU and forms an electrical interface with it. ... This is a list of computer motherboard chipsets made by Intel. ... This generational and chronological list of Intel microprocessors attempts to present all of Intels processors from the pioneering 4-bit 4004 (1971) to the present high-end offerings, the 64-bit Itanium 2 (2002) and Intel Core 2 and Xeon 5100 and 7100 series processors (2006). ... Since many years, Intel names IC development projects after geographical names of towns, rivers or mountains near their development locations. ... . ... . ... The Core 2 brand refers to Intels x86 64-bit microprocessors (with the eighth-generation microarchitecture, named Core architecture) targeted at the consumer and business markets (except the servers) above Pentium Dual-Core. ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... The Celeron is a family of microprocessors from Intel targeted at the low-end consumer market. ... The Core 2 brand refers to Intels x86 64-bit microprocessors (with the eighth-generation microarchitecture, named Core architecture) targeted at the consumer and business markets (except the servers) above Pentium Dual-Core. ... The Intel Pentium Dual-Core is a family of microprocessors from Intel targeted at the low-end consumer market. ... The Xeon microprocessors from Intel are CPUs targeted at the server and workstation markets. ... Intel Pentium 4 (Northwood version), one example out of a huge number of x86 implementations from Intel, AMD, and others. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Celeron: Information from Answers.com (2785 words)
This Celeron (sold under the Celeron M brand) is based on the Pentium M, and differs from its parent in that it has half the L2 cache, and does not support the clock-varying SpeedStep technology.
The Celeron Yonah is a 65 nm Celeron M based on the Core Solo version (single-core) of the Yonah Core.
The only difference between the Northwood-128 and the Willamette-128 Celeron is the fact that it was built on the new 0.13 micrometre process which shrunk the die size, increased the transistor count, and lowered the core voltage from 1.7 V on the Willamette-128 to 1.52 V for the Northwood-128.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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