FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ceiling
Stretched ceiling

A ceiling is an overhead interior surface that bounds the upper limit of a room. It is generally not a structural element, but a finished surface concealing the underside of the floor or roof structure above. The floor function The ceiling function In mathematics, the floor and the ceiling functions are two functions which convert arbitrary real numbers to close integers. ... The term glass ceiling refers to situations where the advancement of a person within the hierarchy of an organization is limited. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2040x1719, 876 KB) The roof (ceiling?) of the nave of Wells Cathedral, Wells, Somerset, England. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2040x1719, 876 KB) The roof (ceiling?) of the nave of Wells Cathedral, Wells, Somerset, England. ... The west front, completed c. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A room, in architecture, is any distinguishable space within a structure. ...


A cathedral ceiling is any tall ceiling area similar to those in a church. For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ...


A dropped ceiling is one in which the finished surface is constructed anywhere from a few inches to several feet below the structure above it. This may be done for aesthetic purposes, such as achieving a desirable ceiling height; or practical purposes such as providing a space for HVAC or piping. An inverse of this would be a raised floor. Dropped (aka suspended) ceiling. ... HVAC may also stand for High-voltage alternating current HVAC systems use ventilation air ducts installed throughout a building that supply conditioned air to a room through rectangular or round outlet vents, called diffusers; and ducts that remove air from return-air grilles Fire-resistance rated mechanical shaft with HVAC... Piping is used to convey fluids (usually liquids and gases but sometimes loose solids) from one location to another. ... Raised floors are used in office buildings with a high requirement for servicing, such as IT data centers, and cary cables electrical supply and sometimes air conditioning server racks or desks in landscaped office areas. ...


A concave or barrel shaped ceiling is curved or rounded, usually for visual or acoustical value, while a coffered ceiling is divided into a grid of recessed square or octagonal panels, also called a lacunar ceiling. A concave set (it has a dent). ... Coffering on the ceiling of the Pantheon, Rome In architecture, a coffer is (plural: coffering) is a sunken panel in the shape of a square or octagon that serves as a decorative device, usually in a ceiling. ... A page of fanciful balusters Arcade a passage or walkway covered over by a succession of arches or vaults supported by columns. ...


Ceilings have frequently been decorated with fresco painting, mosaic tiles and other surface treatments. Many historic buildings have celebrated ceilings, perhaps the most famous is the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... This article is about a decorative art. ... Mission, or barrel, roof tiles A tile is a small, manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as clay or stone used for covering roofs, floors, and walls, or other objects such as tabletops. ... The iconic image of the Hand of God giving life to Adam. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ...


Other meanings

  • In Aviation the word ceiling is used to describe the height of clouds covering more than half the sky, (see also: flight ceiling).
  • In economics, the word "ceiling" is used to describe a governmentally-mandated upper limit. Examples include the ceiling on gasoline prices set by the Venezuelan government or the ceiling on Savings and Loan interest rates formerly set by the United States government.

A flight ceiling is the upper altitudinal limit of which any aircraft may fly given its mechanical abilities. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ceilings
Look up Ceiling in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... A tin ceiling is an architectural element that was very popular in Victorian buildings in North America in the late 19th century and early 20th. ... Dropped (aka suspended) ceiling. ... Coffering on the ceiling of the Pantheon, Rome In architecture, a coffer is (plural: coffering) is a sunken panel in the shape of a square or octagon that serves as a decorative device, usually in a ceiling. ... For the scientific meaning, see luminosity. ... 15 x 15 12 high painted ceiling. ... A statically determinate beam, bending under an evenly distributed load. ... This photograph from 1896 shows the hammerbeam roof of Westminster Hall. ... In mathematics, the floor function is the function defined as follows: for a real number x, floor(x) is the largest integer less than or equal to x. ... Molding is a strip of material that has been dressed or planed on all four surfaces. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ceiling (0 words)
Julius II's decision to completely renovate the decoration of the Ceiling was probably due to the serious problems of a static nature that affected the Sistine Chapel from the earliest years of his pontificate (1503-1513).
They must have been the result of the excavations carried out both to the north and to the south of the building for the construction of the Borgia Tower and for the new St Peter's.
Michelangelo completed the first half of the Ceiling, that is from the entrance wall to the Creation of Eve, in August 1510.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m