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Encyclopedia > Caulking
Caulking - Wikipedia

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Caulking

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For a description of caulking in computer game creation, refer to caulking (computer games) Caulking is a process used in computer-game level creation/editing (or mapping) for the generation of a level, or map, that is less demanding for the computers graphics card to render in_game than the map would be otherwise. ...

Caulking is a process used in the sealing of the seams in wooden boats and making them watertight. A traditional method of doing this was by using oakum which consisted of pieces of untwisted rope that had been soaked in tar. Double wound cotton stands may also be used to achieve the same effect when put into gaps using a caulking mallet and a caulking iron which is a chisel-like device. Process (lat. ... Categories: Technology stubs | Seals (mechanical) ... A news/talk radio station on the frequency of 1300 AM in Grand Rapids, Michigan. ... A boat is a watercraft, usually smaller than most ships. ... Oakum is a preparation of tarred fibre used in shipbuilding, for caulking or packing joints of timbers in wood vessels and the deck planking of iron and steel ships. ... Rope is also the title of a movie by Alfred Hitchcock Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength, for pulling and connecting. ... For the computer term, see tar file format. ... Cotton is a soft fiber that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant, a shrub native to the tropical and subtropical regions of both the Old World and the New World. ... Steel woodworking chisel. ...


An old term for caulk in a maritime context is paye, and the longest joint on a ship was referred to as “the devil.” A common punishment for sailors was being made to re-caulk this joint, giving rise to the terms “time to pay(e) the devil” and “stuck between the devil and the deep blue sea”. From the latin maritimus, maritime refers to things relating to the sea. ... Italian barque Amerigo Vespucci in New York harbor, 1976. ... In society, punishment is the practice of imposing something unpleasant on a wrongdoer. ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ...


The caulking substance may be referred to as caulk or calk and both spellings are interchangeable as a noun, when referring to the substance and as a verb meaning to apply it, when referring to other products and uses where the intent is to seal a gap against water and/or air. Examples include a specific method of joining glass to frames and a sealant that may be used in the gaps between bathroom floors and walls.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Caulking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (619 words)
Caulking is a process used to seal the seams in wooden boats, in order to make them watertight, or to close up crevices in buildings against water, air, dust or insects.
An old term for caulk in a maritime context is paye, and the longest joint on a ship was referred to as “the devil”.
Unlike construction caulk, which is applied where no building movement is expected, a sealant is made of elastomeric materials that typically allow movement of 25% to 50% of the width of the joint.
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