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Encyclopedia > Cato Institute

Cato Institute

Established 1977
Chairman William A. Niskanen
President Edward H. Crane
Faculty 40
Staff 33
Budget US$19.4 million
Location Washington, D.C.
Address 1000 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Website www.cato.org

Part of a series on
Libertarianism
The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... William A. Niskanen is chairman of the Cato Institute, a position he has held since 1985 following service on President Reagans Council of Economic Advisers. ... Edward H. Crane is the founder and president of the Cato Institute. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Look up budget in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article does not adequately cite its references. ...

Schools of thought

Agorism
Anarcho-capitalism
Geolibertarianism
Green libertarianism
Right-libertarianism
Left-libertarianism
Minarchism
Neolibertarianism
Paleolibertarianism
Agorism is a radical left-libertarian political philosophy popularized by Samuel Edward Konkin III, who defined an agorist as a conscious practitioner of counter-economics (peaceful black markets and grey markets). ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds along with other forms of libertarian individualism that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community. ... Green-Libertarian describes a political philosophy that was established in the United States. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that holds that individuals should be allowed complete freedom of action as long as they do not infringe on the freedom of others. ... Left-libertarianism is a term that has been adopted by several different movements and theorists. ... In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal — only large enough to protect the liberty and property of each individual. ... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Lew Rockwell and Murray Rothbard, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ...

Origins

Austrian School
Chicago School
Classical liberalism
Individualist anarchism
The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ... The Chicago School of Economics is a school of thought in economics; it refers to the style of economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago after 1946. ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam... Individualist Anarchism is an anarchist philosophical tradition that has a strong emphasis on sovereignty of the individual[1] and is generally opposed to collectivism[2]. The tradition appears most often in the United States, most notably in regard to its advocacy of private property. ...

Ideas

Civil liberties
Free markets
Free trade
Laissez-faire
Liberty
Individualism
Non-aggression
Private property
Self-ownership
Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Liberty is generally considered a concept of political philosophy and identifies the condition in which an individual has immunity from the arbitrary exercise of authority. ... Methodological individualism is a philosophical orientation toward explaining broad society-wide developments as the accumulation of decisions by individuals. ... The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, anticoercion principle, or zero aggression principle) is a deontological ethical stance associated with the libertarian movement. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... Self-ownership or sovereignty of the individual or individual sovereignty is the condition where an individual has the exclusive moral right to control his or her own body and life. ...

Topics

Economic views
Libertarian theorists
History
Movement
Parties
Theories of law
Views of rights
Criticism of libertarianism
Economic libertarianism is the doctrine that government should not engage in economic interventionism, but only prohibit force and fraud. ... This is a list of notable Libertarian theorists and authors. ... Modern libertarians see themselves as having revived the original doctrine of liberalism, and often call themselves libertarians and classical liberals interchangeably. ... The libertarian movement consists of the various individuals and institutions who have historically advanced the ideas and causes of libertarianism. ... Many countries and subnational political entities have libertarian political parties. ... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ... Libertarians and Objectivists limit what they define as rights to variations on the right to be left alone, and argue that other rights such as the right to a good education or the right to have free access to water are not legitimate rights and do not deserve the same... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that supports largely unrestricted property rights and opposes most government interventions (such as taxation, prosecution of victimless crimes and regulations on businesses beyond the minimum required to prevent fraud or property damage) as coercive, even if a democratic majority supports it. ...

Politics Portal
This box:  v  d  e 

The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. Image File history File links Portal. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... This article is about the institution. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2...


The Institute's stated mission is "to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace" by striving "to achieve greater involvement of the intelligent, lay public in questions of (public) policy and the proper role of government." Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... Liberty is generally considered a concept of political philosophy and identifies the condition in which an individual has immunity from the arbitrary exercise of authority. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ...

Contents

History

The Cato Institute

The Institute was founded in San Francisco, California in 1977 by Edward H. Crane and initially funded by Charles G. Koch. The Institute is named after Cato's Letters, a series of British essays penned in the early 18th century expounding the political views of philosopher John Locke. The essays were named after Cato the Younger, the defender of republican institutions in Rome. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 867 KB) Summary The CATO building. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 867 KB) Summary The CATO building. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Edward H. Crane is the founder and president of the Cato Institute. ... Charles de Ganahl Koch (born November 1, 1935) is chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Koch Industries, Inc. ... The essays called Catos Letters were written by two Englishmen, concealing their identities with the honored ancient Roman name of Cato. ... This article is about John Locke, the English philosopher. ... Marcus Porcius Catō UticÄ“nsis (95 BC–46 BC), known as Cato the Younger (Cato Minor) to distinguish him from his great-grandfather Cato the Elder, was a politician and statesman in the late Roman Republic, and a follower of the Stoic philosophy. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ...


Murray Rothbard was an important founding member. He was part of Cato's original three-member board and suggested its name. After he came into sharp disagreement with other members, he left in 1981.[1] Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ...


Cato relocated to Washington, D.C. in 1981, settling first in a townhouse on Capitol Hill. The institute moved to its current location on Massachusetts Avenue in 1993. Massachusetts Avenue, colloquially abbreviated Mass. ...


In November 2002, shortly after Cato's website was named the "Best Advocacy Website" by the Web Marketing Association, the Alexa ratings service issued a report saying that it was "the most popular think tank site over the past three months," receiving a total of 188,901 unique visitors during the previous month of September.[2] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rating is a means of classifying things in different categories. ...


Publications

The Cato Institute publishes the periodicals Cato's Letter,Cato Journal, Regulation, Cato Supreme Court Review, and Cato Policy Report, as well as policy studies. Cato's books include Social Security: The Inherent Contradiction, In Defense of Global Capitalism, Voucher Wars, You Can't Say That!: The Growing Threat to Civil Liberties from Antidiscrimination Laws, Peace and Freedom: A Foreign Policy for a Constitutional Republic; Restoring the Lost Constitution, and Reclaiming the Mainstream: Individualist Feminism Reconsidered. Also, Cato published Inquiry magazine from 1977 to 1984. Inquiry Magazine was a libertarian magazine published from 1977 to 1984. ...


Principles

According to its motto, the Cato Institute advocates policies that advance "individual liberty, limited government, free markets, and peace.” Cato scholars are libertarian in their policy positions, typically advocating diminished government intervention in domestic, social, and economic policies and decreased military and political intervention worldwide. Specific policy proposals advanced by Cato scholars include such measures as abolishing the minimum wage,[3] reforming illegal-drug policies,[4] eliminating corporate welfare and trade barriers,[5] diminishing federal government involvement in the marketplace[6] and in local and state issues,[7] enhanced school choice,[8] and abolishing government-enforced discrimination along with restrictions on discrimination by private parties.[9] A trade barrier is general term that describes any government policy or regulation that restricts international trade, the barriers can take many forms, including: Import duties Import licenses Export licenses Quotas Tariffs Subsidies Non-tariff barriers to trade Most trade barriers work on the same principle: the imposition of some...


Cato's strained relationship with conservatism

In the years immediately following the Republican Revolution, the Cato Institute was often seen as a standard-bearer of the U.S. conservative political movement. Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan, credited with reshaping and rejuvenating the Republican Party, and key contributors to the late-20th Century conservative movement, were heavily influenced by libertarian ideals. The Republican Revolution refers to the success of Republican Party in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


However, the Cato Institute officially resists being lumped in with the conservative movement because "conservative smacks of an unwillingness to change, of a desire to preserve the status quo;"[10] such tensions have become increasingly evident in recent years, as the Institute has become sharply critical of current Republican standard bearers. [11]The growing division may be attributable to Republican officeholders' growing support of policies promoting government intervention in the economy and society, increased budgetary (over-)spending, and "neo-conservative" foreign policies. Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ...


Cato scholars have also been strongly critical of the expansion of executive power under the younger President Bush[12], and his management of the Iraq War.[13] In 2006 and 2007, Cato published two books critical of the Republican Party's perceived abandonment of the limited-government ideals that swept them into power in 1994. [14] [15] For their part, only a minority of Republican congressmen supported President George W. Bush’s 2005 proposal to partially privatize Social Security, an idea strongly backed by the Institute. And in the 109th Congress, President Bush's immigration plan — which was based on a proposal by Cato scholar Dan Griswold [16] — went down to defeat largely due to the eventual opposition of conservative Republicans congressmen. [17] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article concerns proposals to change the Social Security system in the United States. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ...


Cato on Social Security

The Cato Institute established its Project on Social Security Privatization in 1995, renaming it the Project on Social Security Choice in 2002. The change sought to emphasize that its proposals would allow Americans to opt-in or -out of the program. Like other organizations supporting the 'personal healthcare savings accounts' concept, Cato scholars now avoid using the word "privatization" in describing such policies, due to the presently unpopular sentiments that the public associates with it. [18]


Cato's Social Security proposal involves giving workers the option of investing half of their contributions (6.2 per cent) into individual accounts, in return for forgoing the accrual of any future Social Security entitlement benefits. For workers selecting this option, future claims on already-accrued Social Security benefits could be sold as bonds, allowing the workers to re-invest those funds in higher-yielding securities, if desired. However, for these workers, past and future "payroll tax" contributions to Social Security, nominally made on behalf of the employer, would go to funding the Social Security benefits of people remaining in the traditional system.


Cato scholars have emphasized that the present Social Security system is unsustainable, and will necessitate future tax hikes and benefit cuts to make ends meet. Because of the "pay as you go" nature of the system, present workers are taxed to support past ones (i.e., current retirees). As the ratio of workers-to-retirees drops, workers will bear an increasing payroll-tax burden. Cato scholars also emphasize the benefits of inheritability. Unlike the status quo, Cato's plan would allow a worker who dies before reaching their (variable) retirement age to leave the assets in his/her personal account to legal heirs.


Critics[attribution needed] have charged that Cato's plan relies on a pivotal assumption: that the projected returns from the stock market -- which is where the account funds would be invested -- will outweigh the increased risk of possibly losing those funds, if stock market performance is worse than expected . Some[attribution needed] warn that Cato's projected rate-of-return will not be high enough to provide a sufficient risk premium. A risk premium is the minimum difference between the expected value of an uncertain bet that a person is willing to take and the certain value that he is indifferent to. ...


Cato on foreign policy and civil liberties

In recent years, Cato's non-interventionist foreign policy views, and strong support for civil liberties, have frequently led them to criticize those in power, Republican and Democrat. Cato scholars opposed President George H. W. Bush's 1991 Gulf War operations, President Clinton's interventions in Haiti and Kosovo, and President George W. Bush's 2003 invasion of Iraq. On the other hand, Cato scholars supported the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan as a response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. [19] George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Combatants United States Saudi Arabia Egypt United Kingdom & US-led Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Khalid bin Sultan Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 240 killed in action, 776 wounded, 30 taken prisoner At least 183,000 victims of the Gulf War syndrome Est. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


They have been similarly critical of recent perceived infringements upon American's civil liberties. Cato scholars sharply criticized then-Attorney General Janet Reno's 1993 raid of the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas. More recently, they have opposed the USA Patriot Act, the imprisonment of so-called unlawful enemy combatants like José Padilla, and the second Bush Administration's aggressive assertions of unilateral executive authority. Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the first female Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001). ... Combatants ATF FBI Branch Davidians Commanders Assault: Phil Chojnacki Siege: Many David Koresh† Strength Assault: 75 ATF agents, 3 helicopters with snipers Siege: Hundred of agents, snipers, helicopters, M1 Abrams, CEVs 50+ men, 75+ women and children Casualties 4 dead, 16 wounded in assault 6 dead and 10+ wounded in... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an American act which President George W. Bush signed into law on October 26, 2001. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Unlawful combatant. ... José Padilla (also known as Abdullah al-Muhajir) (born October 18, 1970) is a U.S. citizen accused of being a terrorist by the United States government. ...


Cato on other domestic issues

Cato has published strong criticisms of the 1998 settlement that many U.S. states signed with the tobacco industry.[20] Among other laissez-faire policies, Cato scholars have argued for immigrant entrance into the U.S. work force.[21] The tobacco industry comprises those persons and companies engaged in the growth, preparation for sale, shipment, advertisement, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ...


The Cato Institute also published Policy Analysis #487, which proposed amending the United States Constitution to implement a Balanced Budget Veto Amendment. This would, according to the Institute, act as a self-enforcing mechanism to reduce deficit spending by the U.S. government. The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... The Balanced Budget Veto Amendment is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution put forth by the Libertarian Cato Institute, with the intention of establishing a self-enforcing mechanism to reduce Deficit spending. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In 2003 Cato filed an amicus brief in support of the Supreme Court’s decision in Lawrence v. Texas, which struck down the few remaining state laws that made private, non-commercial homosexual relations between consenting adults illegal. Cato cited the 14th Amendment, among other things, as the source of their support for the ruling. Definition and Explanation: Amicus curiæ (Latin for friend of the court; plural amici curiæ) briefs are legal documents filed by non-litigants in appellate court cases, which include additional information or arguments that those outside parties wish to have considered in that particular case. ... It has been suggested that Matthew Limon be merged into this article or section. ...


Domestically, Cato scholars have been sharp critics of current U.S. drug policy[22], and the perceived growing militarization of U.S. police departments.[23]


Cato on environmental policy

The Cato Institute holds regular briefings on global warming with global warming skeptics as panelists. In December 2003, panelists included Patrick Michaels, Robert Balling and John Christy; Balling and Christy have since made statements indicating that global warming is, in fact, related at least some degree to anthropogenic activity. Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... Global warming skeptics are those who have reservations or even outright objections to one or more of the main tenets of the global warming theory. ... Patrick J. Michaels (born February 15, 1950) is a Research Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. ... Robert C. Balling, Jr. ... Dr. John Christy is a climate scientist whose chief interests are Global Climate Change, Satellite Sensing of Global Climate, and Paleoclimate. ...

No known mechanism can stop global warming in the near term. International agreements, such as the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, would have no detectable effect on average temperature within any reasonable policy time frame (i.e., 50 years or so), even with full compliance international .[24] Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...

In response to the World Watch Report in May 2003 that linked climate change and severe weather events: "It's false. There is absolutely no evidence that extreme weather events are on the increase. None. The argument that more and more dollar damages accrue is a reflection of the greater amount of wealth we've created." - Jerry Taylor[25] Jerry A. Taylor is (as of 2006) the City Manager of Tuttle, Oklahoma. ...


Cato's relationship with the mainstream scientific community has at times been strained. For example, while experts such as Sarah Darby (Oxford), Jon Samet (Johns Hopkins) and Bill Field (University of Iowa) have demonstrated that residential radon exposure is a major public health risk, then-Cato adjunct fellow Steven Milloy re-published articles by Michael Fumento dismissing this research and mounting personal attacks on the scientists. Neither Milloy nor Fumento are scientists. [2] Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... General Name, Symbol, Number radon, Rn, 86 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 6, p Appearance colorless Atomic mass (222) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p6 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8 Physical properties Phase gas Density (0 °C, 101. ... Steven Milloy is a columnist for Fox News and a paid advocate for Phillip Morris, ExxonMobil and other corporations. ... Michael Fumento is an American author, journalist, and attorney who writes about science and health issues, such as obesity, the health dangers of breast implants, teen drug use, Agrarian utopianism, and AIDS. Fumento argues that many reports of threats to society are based on bad science and egregiously misused statistics. ... For a List of scientists, see: List of anthropologists List of astronomers List of biologists List of chemists List of computer scientists List of economists List of engineers List of geologists List of inventors List of mathematicians List of meteorologists List of physicists Scientist pairs List of scientist pairs See...


Funding

The Cato Institute is classified as a 501(c)(3) organization under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. The institute performs no contract research and does not accept government funding. For revenue, the institute is largely dependent on private contributions.


According to its annual report, the Cato Institute had 2006 expenses of $19.4 million and revenue of $20.4 million.[26] The report notes that 74% of Cato's income that year came from individual contributions, 15% from foundations, 3% from corporations, and 8% from "program and other income" (e.g., publication sales, program fees).


Foundation support

The Cato Institute has been supported by:

The Castle Rock Foundation was founded in 1993 with an endowment of $36,596,253 from the Adolph Coors Foundation. ... The Koch Family Foundations, consisting of the David H. Koch Foundation, the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation, and the Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation, are a major funder of libertarian and free market-oriented institutions. ... The Earhart Foundation is a foundation that funds research and scholarship. ... John M. Olin Foundation was a grant-making foundation established in 1953 by John M. Olin, president of the Olin Industries chemical and munitions manufacturing businesses. ... The Koch Family Foundations, consisting of the David H. Koch Foundation, the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation, and the Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation, are a major funder of libertarian and free market-oriented institutions. ... The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is a large and influential right-wing foundation with about half a billion US dollars in assets. ... Richard Mellon Scaife Richard Mellon Scaife (born July 3, 1932) is an American billionaire philanthropist and owner–publisher of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. ...

Corporate support

Like most think tanks, Cato receives support from a variety of corporations, but corporations are a relatively minor source of support for the Institute. In 2006, for example, corporate donations accounted for only three percent of its budget. This article is about the institution. ...


According to Cato supporters, the relative paucity of corporate funding has allowed the Institute to strike an independent stance in its policy research. In 2004, the Institute angered the U.S. pharmaceutical industry by publishing a paper arguing in favor of "drug re-importation." [27] A 2006 study attacked the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a U.S. law that several see as benefiting large media companies at the expense of ordinary consumers. [28] Cato has published numerous studies criticizing what it calls "corporate welfare" -- the practice of public officials funneling taxpayer money, usually via targeted budgetary spending, to politically-connected corporate interests. [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] For example, in 2002, Cato president Ed Crane and Sierra Club executive director Carl Pope teamed up to write an op-ed piece in the Washington Post, calling for the abandonment of the Republican energy bill, arguing that it had become little more than a gravy train for Washington, D.C. lobbyists. [37] Again in 2005, Cato scholar Jerry Taylor teamed up with Daniel Becker of the Sierra Club to attack the Republican Energy Bill as a give-away to corporate interests. [38] The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... Corporate welfare is a pejorative term, first coined by Ralph Nader in 1956, describing a governments bestowal of grants and/or tax breaks on corporations or other special favorable treatment from the government. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. ...


Still, some critics have accused Cato of being too tied to corporate funders, especially in the 1990s. Critical sources report that Cato received funding from Phillip Morris and other tobacco companies in the 1990s, and that at one point Rupert Murdoch served on the boards of directors of both Cato and Phillip Morris. [39] The Knight Ridder newspapers reported that in the late 1990s Cato received financial contributions from the American International Group, "an insurance and financial services company whose business includes managing U.S. retirement plans" as Social Security reform emerged as a more prominent issue. Between 1998 and 2004 the Cato Institute received $90,000 of its funding from ExxonMobil — about a tenth of a percent of the organization's budget over that period. [40] Altria Group, Inc. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Altria Group, Inc. ... Partial list of newspapers The following is a partial list of newspapers owned by Knight Ridder: Contra Costa Times Detroit Free Press Kansas City Star The Miami Herald Philadelphia Inquirer Saint Paul Pioneer Press San Jose Mercury News The State External link Knight Ridder corporate website Categories: Companies traded on... American International Group, Inc. ... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ...


Associates in the news

  • Several Cato Institute-affiliated scholars have achieved academic distinction, including Nobel laureates F. A. Hayek, James M. Buchanan, and Vernon L. Smith.
  • Cato senior fellow Randy Barnett argued the Gonzales v. Raich case in front of the Supreme Court in 2004.
  • Mencken Fellow P. J. O'Rourke is the bestselling author of Parliament of Whores, All the Trouble in the World, and other books.
  • In December 2005, Doug Bandow, a Cato fellow, admitted taking money from lobbyist Jack Abramoff in exchange for writing columns for the Copley News Service favorable to Abramoff clients. The columns did not, however, deviate from Bandow's own views. Copley suspended his column. Bandow resigned from Cato on December 15.
  • In 1999, David Platt Rall, a prominent environmental scientist, died in a car accident. Steven Milloy, at the time a Cato adjunct scholar, celebrated Rall's tragic death on his site junkscience.com, writing: "Scratch one junk scientist who promoted the bankrupt idea that poisoning rats with a chemical predicts cancer in humans exposed to much lower levels of the chemical -- a notion that, at the very least, has wasted billions and billions of public and private dollars." Cato Institute President Edward Crane called Milloy's attack an "inexcusable lapse in judgement and civility," but Milloy refused to apologize. He retained his position with Cato until the end of 2005. Following renewed controversy over the financial support Milloy received from tobacco and oil companies while writing editorial pieces favorable to them, Milloy's name was removed from the list of Cato adjunct scholars.
  • Adjunct scholar Robert L. Bradley, Jr was a speech writer for former Enron CEO Kenneth Lay.

Friedrich Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek (May 8, 1899 – March 23, 1992) was an economist and social scientist of the Austrian School, noted for his defense of free-market capitalism against a rising tide of socialist thought in the mid-20th century. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Randy Barnett Randy E. Barnett (born February 5, 1952) is a lawyer, a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, and a legal theorist in the United States. ... Holding Congress may ban the use of marijuana even where states approve its use for medicinal purposes. ... P.J. ORourke speaks at a January 2007 event at the Cato Institute about his latest book. ... Doug Bandow was a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank. ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ... Jack Abramoff (born February 28, 1958) is an American political lobbyist, a Republican political activist and businessman who is a central figure in a series of high-profile political scandals. ... Copley Press is a privately held newspaper business, originally founded in Illinois, but now based in La Jolla, California. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... David Platt Rall (August 3, 1926 – September 28, 1999) was a cancer specialist and a leader in environmental health studies, whose work in environmental health helped turn it into a scientific discipline. ... Environmental science is the science of the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment, including their effects on all types of organisms. ... Steven Milloy is a columnist for Fox News and a paid advocate for Phillip Morris, ExxonMobil and other corporations. ... Robert L. Bradley, Jr. ... Enron Corporation (Former NYSE ticker symbol: ENE) was an American energy company based in Houston, Texas. ... Kenneth Lee Ken Lay (April 15, 1942 – July 5, 2006), was an American businessman, best known for his role in the widely-reported corruption scandal that led to the downfall of Enron Corporation. ...

Milton Friedman Prize

Since 2002, the Cato Institute has awarded the Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty every two years to "an individual who has made a significant contribution to advancing human freedom." The prize comes with a cash award of $500,000. Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was a prominent American economist and public intellectual. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...


Past prize winners

This article is in need of attention. ... Hernando de Soto (born 1941 in Arequipa) is a Peruvian economist known for his work on the informal economy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Notable associates

Cato president Ed Crane (left) and board member Jeff Yass (center) talk with guest speaker Walter E. Williams (right) at the 15th Annual Benefactor Summit (2003)

Image File history File links Cato. ... Image File history File links Cato. ... Jeff Yass Jeffrey S. Yass is a options trader, managing director and one of the five founders of Susquehana International Group. ... Walter E. Williams (born 1936) is an American economist. ...

Policy scholars

David Boaz is the executive vice president of the influential libertarian U.S think tank the Cato Institute. ... Edward H. Crane is the founder and president of the Cato Institute. ... Daniel T. Griswold is director of the Cato Institutes Center for Trade Policy Studies. ... Andrey Nikolayevich Illarionov (Russian: Андре́й Никола́евич Илларио́нов) (born September 16, 1961) is the former economic policy advisor to the President of Russia, Vladimir Putin. ... Brink Lindsey is Cato Institutes vice president for research. ... William A. Niskanen is chairman of the Cato Institute, a position he has held since 1985 following service on President Reagans Council of Economic Advisers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Willmcw 17:12, July 20, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... José Piñera (born October 6, 1948, in Santiago, Chile) is a Chilean free market economist and politician, best known as the architect of Chiles radical pension reform of 1980. ... Alan Reynolds is a US supply side economist. ... Jerry A. Taylor is (as of 2006) the City Manager of Tuttle, Oklahoma. ... Ian Vásquez is director for the Cato Institutes Project on Global Economic Liberty. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Adjunct scholars

Donald J. Boudreaux became chairman of the department of economics at George Mason University in August 2001. ... Robert L. Bradley, Jr. ... Tyler Cowen (COW-en) (b. ... Michael Cox is a British academic and international relations scholar. ... Richard Epstein Richard A. Epstein, born in 1943, is currently the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. ... Michael Gough (born November 23, 1914) is an English character actor who has appeared in over 100 films. ... Tibor R. Machan, professor emeritus in the department of philosophy at Auburn University, holds the Freedom Communications Professorship of Free Enterprise and Business Ethics at the Argyros School of Business & Economics at Chapman University in Orange, California. ... Randal OToole is an American economist and public policy expert. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Thomas Szasz. ...

Fellows

Randy E. Barnett is a lawyer, law professor at Boston University, and legal theorist in the United States, noted for his libertarian theory of law and his work on contract theory and constitutional law and theory. ... James Bovard is a bestselling libertarian author and lecturer, whose political commentary targets examples of governmental waste, failures, and abuses of power. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Steve H. Hanke is an economist, Presidential advisor, and Cato Institute senior fellow. ... Friedrich Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek (May 8, 1899 – March 23, 1992) was an economist and social scientist of the Austrian School, noted for his defense of free-market capitalism against a rising tide of socialist thought in the mid-20th century. ... Andrei Nikolayevich Illarionov (Андрей Николаевич Илларионов) is the economic policy advisor to Russian President Vladimir Putin. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Dave Kopel is an attorney, researcher and contributing editor to several publications. ... Johan Norberg Johan Norberg (born August 27, 1973) is a Swedish writer devoted to promoting economic globalisation and individual liberty. ... P.J. ORourke speaks at a January 2007 event at the Cato Institute about his latest book. ... Jim Powell is the R.C. Hoiles Senior Fellow at a libertarian think tank, the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., with which he has been associated since 1988. ... Teller (born Raymond Joseph Teller) February 14, 1948) is an American magician, best known as the smaller (59/1. ...

Board of directors

As of January 2007:

Edward H. Crane is the founder and president of the Cato Institute. ... Richard J. Dennis, a former commodities speculator known as the Prince of the Pit,[1] was born in Chicago, in January, 1949. ... David Hamilton Koch (born 1940) was the Libertarian Partys Vice-Presidential candidate in the 1980 U.S. presidential election, sharing the party ticket with Ed Clark. ... Koch Industries, Inc. ... John C. Malone is the current chairman of Liberty Media and graduate and philanthropist of Hopkins School. ... The Liberty Media Corporation (NYSE: L) is an American media conglomerate. ... William A. Niskanen is chairman of the Cato Institute, a position he has held since 1985 following service on President Reagans Council of Economic Advisers. ... E*TRADE NYSE: ET is a financial services company based in New York City. ... Howard Rich is a libertarian political activist and real estate developer in New York City. ... Fred W. Smith (born August 11, 1944) is the founder of Federal Express, or FedEx, the first overnight express delivery company in the world, and the largest in the United States. ... FedEx (NYSE: FDX), whose full corporate name is FedEx Corporation, is a cargo airline, printing, and courier company offering overnight courier, ground, heavy freight, document copying and logistics services. ... Jeff Yass Jeffrey S. Yass is a options trader, managing director and one of the five founders of Susquehana International Group. ... Susquehanna International Group, LLP (SIG) is an international financial trading and services group located in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania with offices located in the United States, Asia and Europe. ...

Former staff and faculty

Radley Balko is a American libertarian writer, thinker, and speaker. ... Doug Bandow was a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank. ... The Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) is a neoliberal think tank based in Washington DC. It calls itself a non-profit, non-partisan research and advocacy institute dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government. ... Dan Greenberg is an American politician and a Republican member of the Arkansas House of Representatives. ... The Arkansas General Assembly is the legislative branch of the Arkansas government. ... The Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) is a neoliberal think tank based in Washington DC. It calls itself a non-profit, non-partisan research and advocacy institute dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government. ... The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a conservative think tank, founded in 1943, whose stated mission is to defend the principles and improve the institutions of American freedom and democratic capitalism — limited government, private enterprise, individual liberty and responsibility, vigilant and effective defense and foreign policies... Steven Milloy is a columnist for Fox News and a paid advocate for Phillip Morris, ExxonMobil and other corporations. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... The Progress & Freedom Foundation is a market-oriented think tank that studies the digital revolution and its implications for public policy. ... The National Center for Public Policy Research, founded in 1982, is a self-described conservative think tank in the United States. ... Julian Sanchez is a libertarian writer living in Washington, DC. He first came to public attention in 2003 when he helped to expose gun control critic John Lott for defending himself in online forums using an assumed identity. ... The libertarian Reason Magazine dedicated an issue to Ayn Rands influence one hundred years after her birth. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.mises.org/journals/lf/1981/1981_01-04.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A39246-2002Nov25?language=printer
  3. ^ http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/2006/06/14/house-faces-the-dumbest-bill-of-the-year-so-far-a-210-increase-in-the-minimum-wage/
  4. ^ http://www.cato.org/current/drug-war/index.html
  5. ^ http://www.cato.org/fiscal/corporate-welfare.html
  6. ^ http://www.cato.org/research/regulatory-studies/index.html
  7. ^ http://www.cato.org/ccs/federalism.html
  8. ^ http://www.cato.org/research/education/choice.html
  9. ^ http://www.cato.org/research/civilrights/index.html
  10. ^ http://cato.org/about/about.html
  11. ^ http://www.tnr.com/doc.mhtml?i=20040913&s=risen091304
  12. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6330
  13. ^ http://www.catostore.org/index.asp?fa=ProductDetails&pid=1441206&method=search&t=iraq&a=&k=&aeid=&adv=&pg=
  14. ^ http://www.catostore.org/index.asp?fa=ProductDetails&pid=1441325
  15. ^ http://www.catostore.org/index.asp?fa=ProductDetails&method=cats&scid=37&pid=1441337
  16. ^ http://www.freetrade.org/pubs/pas/tpa-019es.html
  17. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/27/AR2006052700802_pf.html
  18. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29418-2005Jan22.html
  19. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6662
  20. ^ http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-371es.html
  21. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=2904
  22. ^ http://www.cato.org/current/drug-war/index.html
  23. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6476
  24. ^ [1]Chapter 47 of the Cato Handbook for Congress, 107 Congress
  25. ^ "Enviro Trends: Poor to Bear Brunt of Climate Change. 3 May 2003, as cited by ExxonSecrets.org"
  26. ^ http://www.cato.org/about/reports/annual_report_2006.pdf
  27. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=2305
  28. ^ http://www.publicknowledge.org/node/166
  29. ^ http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-241.html
  30. ^ http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa225.html
  31. ^ http://www.cato.org/pubs/briefs/bp-037es.html
  32. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=1209
  33. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=1467
  34. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=1274
  35. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=3134
  36. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=8230
  37. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=4090
  38. ^ http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=4041
  39. ^ http://www.no-smoke.org/pdf/catoinstitute.pdf
  40. ^ http://www.exxonsecrets.org/html/orgfactsheet.php?id=21

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cato Institute (1145 words)
Cato's mission is to "increase the understanding of public policies based on the principles of limited government, free markets, individual liberty, and peace.
Other, on-going projects include the Cato Center for Constitutional Government, which seeks to apply the doctrine of enumerated powers, or the belief that the federal government should be limited to those powers enumerated in the Constitution, to such areas as property rights, federalism, tort reform, and economic liberty.
Cato is the leading Libertarian think tank; it has close ties to House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-TX), who has frequently given speeches at Cato in the past several years...
Cato Institute Blog (2032 words)
The Cato Institute seeks to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets and peace.
The Cato Institute is a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational foundation under Section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code.
Cato's 2000 revenues were just under $13 million, and it has approximately 90 full-time employees, 60 adjunct scholars, and 16 fellows, plus interns.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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