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Encyclopedia > Catiline orations

In 63 BC Marcus Tullius Cicero (10643 BC), orator, statesman and patriot, attained the rank of consul and in that capacity exposed to the Roman Senate the plot of Lucius Sergius Catilina (approx. 10862 BC) and his friends to overthrow the government of Rome. Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60... Marcus Tullius Cicero (standard English pronunciation ; Classical Latin pronunciation ) (January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin orator and prose stylist. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 111 BC 110 BC 109 BC 108 BC 107 BC - 106 BC - 105 BC 104 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC... Orator is a Latin word for speaker (from the Latin verb oro, meaning I speak or I pray). In ancient Rome, the art of speaking in public (Ars Oratoria) was a professional competence especially cultivated by politicians and lawyers. ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... For modern, semi-diplomatic or colonial consuls, see Consul (representative). ... The Roman Senate (Latin, Senatus) was a deliberative body which was important in the government of both the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire. ... Look up Conspiracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Conspiracy, as a legal term, is an agreement of two or more people either to commit a crime or to achieve a lawful end by unlawful means: see conspiracy (crime), and conspiracy (civil). ... Lucius Sergius Catilina (108 BC?–62 BC), known in English as Catiline, was a Roman politician of the 1st century BC who is best known for the Catiline (or Catilinarian) conspiracy, an attempt to overthrow the Roman Republic, and in particular the power of the aristocratic Senate. ... Centuries: 3rd century BCE - 2nd century BCE - 1st century BCE Decades: 150s BCE 140s BCE 130s BCE 120s BCE 110s BCE - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BCE 70s BCE 60s BCE 50s BCE Years: 113 BCE 112 BCE 111 BCE 110 BCE 109 BCE - 108 BCE - 107 BCE 106 BCE... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ...

Contents


The plot(s), the orations by Cicero

Catiline, who was running for the consulship a second time after having lost the first time around, tried to ensure his victory by resorting to blatant and excessive bribery. Cicero in self-righteous indignation issued a law prohibiting shenanigans of this kind. It was obvious to all that the law was directed specifically at Catiline. Catiline, in turn, conspired with some of his cronies to murder Cicero and the key men of the Senate on the day of the election. Cicero discovered the plan and postponed the election to give the Senate time to discuss the attempted coup d'état. For modern, semi-diplomatic or colonial consuls, see Consul (representative). ... Bribery is a crime defined by Blacks Law Dictionary as the offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of any item of value to influence the actions as an official or other person in discharge of a public or legal duty. ... Shenanigan is a deceitful confidence trick, or mischief causing discomfort or annoyance. ... Friendship is a type of interpersonal relationship that is found among humans and among animals with a high intelligence, such as the higher mammals and some birds. ... A coup détat (pronounced ), or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government against the volonté générale formed by the majority of the citizenry, usually done by a smaller supposedly weaker body that just replaces the top power figures. ...


The day after the election was supposed to be held, Cicero addressed the Senate on the matter and Catiline's reaction was immediate and violent. In response to Catiline's behavior, the Senate issued a senatus consultum ultimum, a kind of declaration of martial law invoked whenever the Senate and the Roman Republic were in imminent danger from treason or sedition. Ordinary law was suspended and Cicero, as consul, was invested with absolute power. Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ...


When the election was finally held, Catiline lost again. Anticipating the bad news, the conspirators had already begun to assemble an army, made up mostly of Sulla's veteran soldiers. The nucleus of conspirators was also joined by senators whose profligate tastes left them permanently without funds. The plan was to initiate an insurrection in all of Italy, put Rome to the torch and to kill as many senators as they could. Alternate uses: See Conspiracy (disambiguation) Conspiracy, in common usage, is the act of working in secret to obtain some goal, usually understood with negative connotations. ... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L·CORNELIVS·L·F·P·N·SVLLA·FELIX) ¹ (ca. ... Insurrection could refer to: * in a general sense, it means Rebellion * it is also a title of a Star Trek film, see Star Trek: Insurrection ...


Through some crafty moves of his own, Cicero knew exactly what was being planned. On November 8, Cicero called for a meeting of the Senate in the Temple of Jupiter in the Capitol, which was used for this purpose only when great danger threatened. Catiline had the temerity to attend as well. It was then that Cicero delivered directly to Catiline his famous: The Akshardham Hindu temple, Delhi, India The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Piazza del Campidoglio, on the top of Capitoline Hill, with the façade of Palazzo Senatorio. ...


ORATIO IN CATILINAM PRIMA IN SENATU HABITA

As political orations go, this was relatively short- roughly 317 lines of Latin- and to the point. The opening remarks are still widely remembered and used after 2,000 years:

Quo usque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra? Quam diu etiam furor iste tuus nos eludet?
How long, O Catiline, will you abuse our patience? How long is that madness of yours still to mock us?

Catiline tried to reply after the speech, but senators repeatedly interrupted him. He ran from the temple, hurling threats at the Senate. Later he left the city and went to the camp of Manlius, who was in charge of the army of rebels. The next morning Cicero assembled the people, and delivered to them his:


ORATIO IN CATILINAM SECUNDA AD POPULUM

Here he informed the citizens of Rome that Catiline had left the city, not in exile (as it was rumored), but to join up with his illegal army. He described the conspirators as rich men who were in debt, men eager for power and wealth, Sulla's veterans, ruined men who hoped for any change, criminals, profligates, and other men of Catiline's ilk. He assured the people of Rome that they had nothing to fear because he, the consul, and the gods would protect the state. for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... Michelangelos depiction of God in the painting Creation of the Sun and Moon in the Sistine Chapel This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and derived henotheistic forms. ... A state is an organized political community, occupying a territory, and possessing internal and external sovereignty, which successfully claims the monopoly of the use of force. ...


Meanwhile, Catiline joined up with Manlius, commander of the rebel force. When the Senate was informed of these developments, they declared the two of them public enemies. Antonius, with troops loyal to Rome, followed Catiline while Cicero remained at home to guard the city. During the battle that took place between the 2nd and 3rd orations, Catiline saw that he would lose and in consequence threw himself into middle of the Roman troops, which promptly killed him. The year was 62 BC. The above is wrong. Cataline was later put to death in Rome. Eventually Cicero obtained documents and confessions of many of the conspirators, and the whole matter was presented to the people in his: See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ...


ORATIO IN CATILINAM TERTIA AD POPULUM

In this speech, Cicero claims that the city should rejoice because it has been saved from a bloody rebellion. He asked for nothing for himself but grateful remembrance of the city, and acknowledged that this victory was more difficult than one in foreign lands because the enemies were citizens of Rome.


References

  • At Gutenberg Project:
    • The four Cataline Orations in Latin, in a single text file
  • At Perseus Project (Latin text, translation and analysis):
    • English, with notes and introductions (ed. C. D. Yonge):
      • THE FIRST ORATION OF M. T. CICERO AGAINST LUCIUS CATILINA
      • THE SECOND ORATION OF M. T. CICERO AGAINST LUCIUS CATILINA
      • THE THIRD ORATION OF M. T. CICERO AGAINST LUCIUS CATILINA
      • THE FOURTH ORATION OF M. T. CICERO AGAINST LUCIUS CATILINA
    • Latin (ed. Albert Clark):
      • ORATIO QVA L. CATILINAM EMISIT IN SENATV HABITA
      • IN L. CATILINAM ORATIO SECVNDA HABITA AD POPVLVM
      • IN L. CATILINAM ORATIO TERTIA HABITA AD POPVLVM
      • IN L. CATILINAM ORATIO QVARTA HABITA IN SENATV
  • At gracie.smsu Cicero's Orations (Latin and English)
  • At UAH: Latin text, introduction and translation notes

 
 

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