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Encyclopedia > Catholic Relief Act 1829
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states to the United Kingdom
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The Catholic Relief Act 1829 (10 Geo IV c.7) was passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom on 24 March 1829, and received the Royal Assent on 13 April. It was the culmination of the process of Catholic Emancipation in the United Kingdom, and in Ireland it repealed the last of the Penal Laws. Its passage followed a campaign on the issue by Irish lawyer and newly elected MP Daniel O'Connell. This is a list of Acts of Parliament of the English Parliament during that bodys existence prior to the Act of Union of 1707. ... This is a list of Acts of Parliament of the English Parliament during that bodys existence prior to the Act of Union of 1707. ... This is a list of Acts of Parliament of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Ireland for the years up to its dissolution in 1800. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain for the years 1707-1719. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain for the years 1720-1739. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain for the years 1740-1759. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain for the years 1760-1779. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain for the years 1780-1799. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1800-1819. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1820-1839. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1840-1859. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1860-1879. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1880-1899. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1900-1919. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1920-1939. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1940-1959. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1960-1979. ... This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 1980-1999. ... This is an list of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the years 2000 to the present. ... This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Acts passed by the Parliament of Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly passed by that body during its existence between 2000 and 2002 when it was suspended. ... The is a list of Orders in Council for Northern Ireland which are primary legislation for the province when the it is being directly ruled from London and also for those powers not devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Statutory Instruments (SIs) are parts of United Kingdom law separate from Acts of Parliament which do not require full Parliamentary approval before becoming law. ... The is a list of Church of England Measures which are church legislation Church of England. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ... The Penal laws in Ireland refers to a series of laws imposed under British rule that sought to discriminate against the majority native Catholic population but also against Protestant dissenters in favour of the established Church of Ireland. ... Daniel OConnell Daniel OConnell (6 August 1775 – 15 May 1847), known as The Liberator or The Emancipator, was Irelands predominant politician in the first half of the nineteenth century. ...


The act allowed Catholics to have a seat in parliament. This condition was crucial as Daniel O'Connell had won a seat in a by-election in County Clare but under British law he was forbidden (because of his religion) to take his seat in Westminster. Sir Robert Peel, who had for all of his career opposed emancipation (and had, in 1815, challenged O'Connell to a duel) was forced to conclude: "though emancipation was a great danger, civil strife was a greater danger." Fearing a revolution in Ireland, Peel drew up the Catholic Relief Bill and guided it through the House of Commons. To overcome the opposition of both the House of Lords and King George IV, the Duke of Wellington worked to ensure passage in the House of Lords, and threatened to resign as Prime Minister if the King did not give Royal Assent. County Clare (Contae an Chláir in Irish) is in the Irish province of Munster. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... This is about the British Prime Minister. ... British House of Commons Canadian House of Commons In some bicameral parliaments of a Westminster System, the House of Commons has historically been the name of the elected lower house. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... The Dukedom of Wellington, derived from Wellington in Somerset, is a hereditary title and the senior Dukedom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ...


The Catholic Relief Act was a compromise, however, and effectively disenfranchised the Catholic peasants of Ireland, the so-called Forty Shilling Freeholders. The act raised fivefold the economic qualifications for voting. Starting in 1793, any man renting or owning land worth at least forty shillings (the equivalent of two Pounds Sterling), had been permitted to vote. Under the Catholic Relief Act, this was raised to ten pounds. Forty Shilling Freeholders was the term given to those who were given the vote under the 1793 Catholic Relief Bill. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The shilling (or informally: bob) was an English coin first issued in 1548 for Henry VIII, although arguably the testoon issued about 1487 for Henry VII was the first English shilling. ... GBP redirects here. ...


The act also makes it illegal for a Catholic to directly or indirectly advise the British Sovereign on appointments in the Church of England. There has not yet been a Catholic Prime Minister to date, since the act's passing. The Prime Minister usually advises the Soverign on appointment of Bishops in the Church, although today, the Prime Minister's role is somewhat of a formality, channelling information from the Church authorities to the Sovereign. The current Prime Minister, Tony Blair, whilst married to a Catholic, is not one himself. The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service and MP for Sedgefield. ...


External links

  • The text of the act
  • History of emancipation
Major constitutional laws affecting Ireland

Pre-Union

Poyning's Law (1492)
Grattan's constitution (1782)
Act of Union (1800)
Image File history File links St_Patrick's_saltire. ... Poynings Law refers to Sir Edward Poynings declaration to the Irish Parliament at Drogheda in 1494. ... The Irish Parliament, a mediaeval body made up of the Irish House of Commons and the Irish House of Lords, and from which Roman Catholics had been excluded from both membership and voting for, had been subject to a number of restrictions imposed by English governments as to its ability... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...

United Kingdom UK Acts

Catholic Relief Act (1829)
Church Disestablishment Act (1869)
Representation of the People Act (1918)
Government of Ireland Act (1920)
Statute of Westminster (1931)
Northern Ireland Constitution Act (1973)
Northern Ireland Act (1998)
Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The Irish Church Disestablishment Act was the United Kingdom legislation whereby William Gladstones administration disestablished the Church of Ireland, disassociating it from the state and as such removing the rule that tithes had to be paid to a church that commanded the adherence of a minority of the population... The Representation of the People Act 1918 widened suffrage by abolishing practically all property qualifications for men and by enfranchising women over 30 who met minimum property qualifications. ... An Act to Provide for the Better Government of Ireland, more usually the Government of Ireland Act, 1920 (this is its official short title; the formal citation is 10 & 11 Geo. ... The Statute of Westminster 1931 was the enactment of the United Kingdom Parliament (December 11, 1931) which established a status of legislative equality between the self-governing dominions of the British Empire and the United Kingdom. ... The Northern Ireland Constitution Act was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1973 to replace the previous system established by the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898. ... The Northern Ireland Act 1998 is part of the Labour governments constitutional reform programme. ...

Republic of Ireland Constitutions

Dáil Constitution (1919)
Free State Constitution (1922)
Constitution of Ireland (1937)
Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... The Constitution of Dáil Éireann (Irish: Bunreacht Dála Éireann), more commonly known as the Dáil Constitution, was a short, provisional constitution adopted by the First Dáil in January 1919. ... The Constitution of the Irish Free State was the constitution of the independent Irish state established in December 1922. ... The Constitution of Ireland is the founding legal document of the state known today as the Republic of Ireland. ...

Republic of Ireland Oireachtas Acts

Ministers and Secretaries Act (1924)
Courts of Justice Act (1924)
External Relations Act (1936)
Republic of Ireland Act (1948)
Human Rights Act (2003)
Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... The Ministers and Secretaries Act, 1924 was one of the key statute laws enacted by the Irish Free State. ... The Courts of Justice Act 1924 was an Act of the Oireachtas that established the courts system of the Irish Free State. ... The Executive Authority (External Relations) Act, 1936 was an enactment of the Oireachtas (Irish parliament) in 1936. ... The Republic of Ireland Act was an enactment of Oireachtas Éireann passed in 1948, which came into force on April 18, 1949 and which declared that the official description of Ireland was to be the Republic of Ireland. ... The European Convention on Human Rights Act, 2003 was an Act of the Oireachtas that enshrined the European Convention on Human Rights in Irish law. ...

United Nations Treaties

Anglo-Irish Treaty (1922)
European Convention (1950)
Treaties of the EU (1973-2003)
Good Friday Agreement (1998)
Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty The Anglo-Irish Treaty, officially called the Articles of association between Ireland and the British Empire, was a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and representatives of the (extra-judicial) Irish Republic which concluded the Anglo-Irish War. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights, was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... The treaties of the European Union are effectively its constitutional law, making up the EUs primary legislation. ... The Belfast Agreement (the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ...


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