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Encyclopedia > Catherine Howard
Catherine Howard
Queen Consort of England
Miniature watercolour portrait of Catherine Howard, attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger. The manner of dress and jewellery suggest the subject's identity as Catherine.
Born between 1520 and 1525
Died 13 February 1542
Consort 28 July 154013 February 1542
Consort to Henry VIII
Father Lord Edmund Howard
Mother Joyce Culpepper

Cathrine Howard (between 1520 and 152513 February 1542), also called Katherine Howard[1] was the fifth wife of Henry VIII of England (1540-1542), and sometimes known by his reference to her as "the rose without a thorn". Her birth date and place of birth is unknown, (occasionally cited as 1521, probably in London). She was the daughter of Lord Edmund Howard, a poor younger son of the 2nd Duke of Norfolk. Catherine married Henry VIII on 28 July 1540, at Oatlands Palace in Surrey, almost immediately after his annulment from Anne of Cleves was arranged. However, Catherine's marital conduct and past sexual history were known to be unchaste, and she was beheaded after less than two years of marriage on the grounds of treason. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... For the Korean music group, see Jewelry (group). ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1540 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... LORD EDMUND HOWARD BORN: between 1472 and 1497 DIED: 19 March 1539. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... For other uses, see The Six Wives of Henry VIII. // The six wives (queens consort) of Henry VIII of England were, in order: Catherine of Aragon (annulled), Anne Boleyn (beheaded), Jane Seymour (died, childbirth fever), Anne of Cleves (annulled), Catherine Howard (beheaded), and Catherine Parr (survived him). ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... LORD EDMUND HOWARD BORN: between 1472 and 1497 DIED: 19 March 1539. ... Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (c. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1540 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Oatlands is a district in Surrey near Weybridge (Weybridge website), which in Tudor and Stuart times was the location of a royal palace. ... This article is about the English county. ... Anne of Cleves (22 September 1515 – 16 July 1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540. ... Sexual abstinence or chastity is the practice of voluntarily refraining from sexual intercourse and (usually) other sexual activity. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Rise and fall

Early life

Catherine Howard was the tenth child of Lord Edmund Howard and Joyce (Jocasta) Culpepper. Her older siblings (not in chronological order) were as follows: Ralph, George, Henry, Charles, Mary, Thomas, Isabel, Joyce,and Margaret.


Catherine's exact date of birth is unknown, although the year has been estimated as being between 1520 and 1525. She was the niece of the Duke of Norfolk, and a first cousin to Henry's second wife Queen Anne Boleyn and her sister Mary Boleyn, a former lover to Henry VIII. Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk by Hans Holbein. ... A cousin chart identifies the correct name for the relationship between two people with a common ancestor. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ... Mary Boleyn (c. ...


Catherine's family therefore had an aristocratic pedigree, but her father, a younger son, was not well-off and often begged for handouts from his more powerful relatives. His niece, Anne Boleyn, got him a government job working for the king in Calais in 1531[citation needed]. Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...


At this point, young Catherine was sent to live with her step-grandmother, Agnes Tilney, the Dowager Duchess of Norfolk. Miniature watercolour portrait of Catherine Howard, attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger. ... A dowager is a widow who holds a title or property, or Dower, derived from her deceased husband. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ...


The Dowager Duchess ran a large household at Lambeth Palace, and she had numerous female and male attendants, along with her many wards; usually the children of relatives who could not afford to support their families. Supervision was lax, as the Dowager Duchess was often at Court and took little interest in the upbringing and education of her wards. Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ...


Consequently, Catherine was least educated of Henry's wives, although she could read and write, unlike many English women of her time. Her character is often described as merry and vivacious, but never scholarly or devout, and a casual upbringing in the licentious atmosphere of the Duchess's household led to a romance with her music teacher, Henry Mannox around 1536, when Catherine was between the ages of eleven and thirteen. When she became queen, Mannox was appointed as a musician in her household. Mannox later gave evidence in the inquiry against her.


Mannox and Catherine both confessed during her adultery trial that they had engaged in physical contact similar to sexual foreplay: "At the flattering and fair persuasions of Mannox being but a young girl I suffered him at sundry times to handle and touch the secret parts of my body which neither became me with honesty to permit nor him to require." She said. "And I do also admit that I enjoyed his relationship with me, though I shall never regret loving him, I do now love Henry."


This affair came to an end in 1538, when Catherine was pursued by a secretary of the Duchess' household, Francis Dereham. They became lovers, addressing each other as "husband" and "wife". Dereham also entrusted Catherine with wifely duties such as keeping his money when he was away on business. Many of Catherine's roommates knew of the affair, and it was apparently ended in 1539 when the Dowager Duchess caught wind of the matter. Despite this, Catherine and Dereham may have parted with intentions to marry upon his return from Ireland, a "precontract", as it was then known. Indeed, if they had exchanged vows of their intention to marry before having sexual intercourse in bed they would have been considered married in the eyes of the church. Francis Dereham was most famous for his affair with Queen Catherine Howard, Fifth wife of Henry VIII of England. ...

The Six Wives of
King Henry VIII
Catherine of Aragon
Anne Boleyn
Jane Seymour
Anne of Cleves
Catherine Howard
Catherine Parr

“Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (635x872, 217 KB) العربية | Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Katherine of Aragon (Alcalá de Henares, 16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536), Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla, also known popularly after her time as Catherine of Aragon, was the first wife and Queen Consort of Henry VIII of England. ... Image File history File links Anne_boleyn. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ... Download high resolution version (801x1300, 189 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... Download high resolution version (829x1106, 148 KB) Anne of Cleves by Hans Holbein the Younger File links The following pages link to this file: Anne of Cleves Wives of Henry VIII ... Anne of Cleves (22 September 1515 – 16 July 1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540. ... Image File history File links HowardCatherine02. ... katherine parr A 16th century painting of Katherine Parr, sixth wife of Henry VIII. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Catherine Parr or Jane Grey Catherine Parr (c. ...

Arrival at court

Catherine's uncle found her a place at the court of Henry VIII. As a young and attractive lady-in-waiting to Henry's new German wife, Queen Anne of Cleves, Catherine quickly caught the attention of the King, who displayed little interest in Anne from the start. Her relatives privately doubted that the young woman was mature enough to handle the responsibilities of being the King's mistress, as she had just arrived at Court a few months earlier, but other factors were at play. The memory of Anne Boleyn's death for supposed adultery marred the standing of the Norfolks (a family proud of their grand lineage) in Henry VIII's court, and the Catholic family saw Catherine as a figurehead for their mission to restore the Catholic faith to England. As the King's interest in their relative grew, so did their influence. Within months of her arrival at Court, Henry bestowed gifts of land and expensive cloth upon Catherine. “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Lady in Waiting is an album by American southern rock band The Outlaws, released in 1976. ... Anne of Cleves (22 September 1515 – 16 July 1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540. ...


Marriage

When Henry had his marriage to Anne annulled on July 9, 1540, rumours swirled that Catherine was pregnant with his child. Their quick marriage just a few weeks after the divorce from Anne, on July 28th, 1540, reflected Henry's lifelong urgency to secure the Tudor succession by begetting healthy sons. Henry, nearing 50 and expanding in girth, showered his young bride with wealth, jewels and fantastically expensive gifts. War with France and the Reformation had cost Henry the goodwill of his people, and he was then suffering from a number of ailments. The presence of a young and seemingly virtuous Catherine in his life brought him great happiness. Her motto, "Non autre volonte que la sienne" or "No other wish (will) but his", reflects her queenly desire to keep Henry, a man thirty years older than she was, content. Succession is the act or process of pooing or of following in order or sequence. ...


However, despite her wealth and power, Catherine found her marital relations unappealing. She was not pregnant upon marriage, and became repulsed by her husband's grotesque body. (He weighed 136kg, or 300 pounds, at the time and had a festering ulcer on his thigh that had to be drained daily.) In early 1541, she embarked upon a light-hearted romance with Henry's favourite male courtier, Thomas Culpepper, whom she initially desired when she came to court two years earlier. Their meetings were arranged by one of Catherine's older ladies-in-waiting, Lady Rochford, the widow of Anne and Mary Boleyn's brother George Boleyn. Thomas Culpeper (ex. ... Jane Boleyn, Viscountess Rochford (~1505–February 13, 1542) was an English noblewoman who lived in the reign of Henry VIII. She was a sister-in-law of Henrys second wife Anne Boleyn and lady-in-waiting to his fifth wife Catherine Howard, with whom she was executed. ... George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford (c. ...


Meanwhile, Henry and Catherine toured England together in the summer of 1541, and preparations for any signs of pregnancy (which would lead to a coronation) were in place, indicating that the married couple were sexually active with each other. As Catherine's extramarital liaison progressed, people who had witnessed her indiscretions at Lambeth Palace began to contact her for favours. In order to buy their silence, she appointed many of them to her household. Most disastrously, she appointed Henry Mannox as one of her musicians and Francis Dereham as her personal secretary. This led to Catherine's charge of treason and adultery two years after the king married her.


Downfall

By late 1541, the "northern progress" of England had ended, and Catherine's indiscretions rapidly became known thanks to John Lascelles, a Protestant reformer whose sister, Mary Hall, was a chambermaid to the Dowager Duchess and therefore witnessed Catherine's youthful liaisons. Motivated by the growing threat to his faith from conservative Catholicism, Lascelles presented the information to Thomas Cranmer, then Archbishop of Canterbury and a close advisor of Henry's. Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...


Cranmer, aware that any precontract with Dereham would invalidate Catherine's marriage to Henry, gave Henry a letter with the accusations against Catherine on November 2, 1541, as they attended an All Souls' Day mass. Henry at first refused to believe the allegations, thinking the letter was a forgery, and requested Cranmer further investigate the matter. Within a few days, corroborative proof was found, including the confessions issued from Dereham and Culpepper after they were tortured in the Tower of London; as well as a love letter written distinctively in Catherine's handwriting to Culpepper. is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ... This article is about the Christian religious holiday. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ...


Catherine was charged with treason, but never, even to her confessor just hours before her death, admitted to betraying the King with Culpepper. Though she readily admitted her behaviour prior to her marriage was unbecoming to say the least of a Lady of her rank, let alone a Queen of England.


Catherine was arrested on 12 November. According to legend, she escaped her guard's clutches briefly to run to the church where Henry was taking Mass. She banged on the doors and screamed Henry's name. Eventually she was arrested by the guards and was taken to her rooms in Hampton Court, where she was confined, accompanied only by Lady Rochford. Her pleas to see Henry were ignored, and Cranmer interrogated her regarding the charges. Even the staunch Cranmer found Catherine's frantic, incoherent state pitiable, saying, "I found her in such lamentation and heavyness as I never saw no creature, so that it would have pitied any man's heart to have looked upon her." [2] He ordered the guards to remove any objects that she might use to commit suicide. is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The clock tower straddles the entrance between the inner and outer courts Hampton Court Palace is a former royal place on the north bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames about 12 miles (19 km) southwest and upstream of Central London, nowadays open to...


While a precontract between Catherine and Dereham would have the unfortunate effect of terminating Catherine's royal marriage, it also would have allowed Henry to annul their marriage and banish her from court. Catherine would be disgraced, impoverished, and exiled, but ultimately spared the grisly fate of Anne Boleyn. However, she steadfastly denied any precontract, stating that Dereham forced himself upon her.


Imprisonment and death

Catherine was stripped of her title as queen on 22 November and imprisoned in Syon House, Middlesex, through the winter of 1541. Thomas Culpepper and Francis Dereham were executed at Tyburn on 10 December 1541 — the former beheaded, the latter hanged, drawn and quartered — for treasonous conduct [1]. As customary, their heads were placed atop London Bridge. Her relatives were also detained in the Tower, except her uncle Thomas, the Duke of Norfolk, who had sufficiently detached himself from the scandal. All of the Howard prisoners were tried, found guilty of concealing treason and sentenced to life imprisonment and forfeiture of goods. However, in time they were released with their goods restored. is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Syon House before the alterations of the 1760s Robert Adams plan for the reconstruction of Syon House. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ...


She remained in suspension until Parliament passed a bill of attainder on 21 January 1542, that made the intent to commit treason punishable by death. This solved the matter of Catherine's supposed precontract and made her unequivocally guilty, as adultery by a queen was treason. She was taken to the Tower of London on 10 February 1542. On 11 February, Henry signed the bill of attainder into law, and Catherine's execution was scheduled for 7 AM on 13 February. A bill of attainder (also known as an act or writ of attainder) is an act of legislature declaring a person or group of persons guilty of some crime, and punishing them, without benefit of a trial. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The night before her execution, Catherine is said to have spent many hours practising how to lay her head upon the block. She died with relative composure, but looked pale and very terrified, and required assistance to climb the scaffold. Her speech about the "worthy and just punishment" asked for mercy for her family and prayers for her soul. According to popular folklore, her last words were, "I die a Queen, but I would rather have died the wife of Culpepper." She was quickly beheaded with one stroke, and her body was buried in an unmarked grave in the nearby chapel of St Peter ad Vincula, where her cousin, Anne Boleyn, also lay. Henry was not present. Her body was one of those identified during restorations of the chapel during the reign of Queen Victoria and she is commemorated on a plaque on the west wall dedicated to those who died in the Tower. Scaffold may refer to: scaffolding as used in construction A gallows The Scaffold, UK musical group Scaffold - GNOME Development Environment Scaffold (Protein ECM) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... , Side of St. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ...


Francis I of France wrote a letter to Henry upon news of Catherine's death, regretting the "lewd and naughty behaviour of the Queen" and advising him that "The lightness of women cannot bend the honour of men". When Sir William Paget had informed him of Catherine's misconduct, he exclaimed "She hath done wondrous naughty!".[3] Francis I of France (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... William Paget, 1st Baron Paget of Beaudesert (1506 - June 9, 1563), English statesman, son of William Paget, one of the serjeants-at-mace of the city of London, was born in London in 1506, and was educated at St Pauls School, and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, proceeding afterwards to...


Lineage

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. Robert Howard (before 1407-1436)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk (before 1428-1485)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Lady Margaret Mowbray (before 1400-after 1437)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (1443-1524)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. Sir William de Moleyns (1378-1425)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Catherine Moleyns (?-1465)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Marjery Whalesborough (?-1439)[6]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Lord Edmund Howard (1472/97-1539)[4]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Sir Philip Tilney (before 1437-c. 1453)[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Sir Frederick Tylney[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Isabel Thorp (?-1436)[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Elizabeth Tilney (before 1462-1497)[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Sir Lawrence Cheney (c. 1396-1461)[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Elizabeth Cheney[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Elizabeth Cokayn[7]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Catherine Howard (1520/25-1542)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. Sir John Culpepper[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. Sir William Culpepper[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Catherine Charles[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Sir Richard Culpeper (?-c. 1507)[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. Robert Ferrers, 5th Lord Ferrers (of Chartley) (before 1387-c. 1413)[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Philippa Ferrers[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Margaret Despenser (before 1375-1415)[8]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Joyce Culpeper (before 1507-?)[5]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Richard Worsley (before 1461-?)[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Ottwell Worsley (before 1477-?)[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Catherine Clark (before 1461-?)[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Joyce Worsley (before 1493-?)[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Edward Trevor (before 1461-?)[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Rose Trevor (before 1477-?)[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Angharad Puleston[9]
 
 
 
 
 
 

John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. ... Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (c. ... LORD EDMUND HOWARD BORN: between 1472 and 1497 DIED: 19 March 1539. ...

Historiography

Victorian writer Agnes Strickland argued that Catherine had been innocent of all charges laid against her. Others, namely American historian Lacey Baldwin Smith, described her life as one of "hedonism" and Catherine as a "juvenile delinquent". Alison Weir, in her 1991 book The Six Wives of Henry VIII, described her as "an empty-headed wanton". Agnes Strickland (1796-1874) was an English historical writer. ... Alison Weir (born 1951) is a British writer of history books for the general public, mostly in the form of biographies about British kings and queens. ...


Other biographers are more sympathetic -- particularly David Starkey, who offered revolutionary theories on Catherine's adultery, and feminist activist Karen Lindsey, whose book Divorced Beheaded Survived: A Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII (1995) is sympathetic but realistic in its assessment. David Robert Starkey (born January 3, 1945) is one of Englands best-known historians, and a specialist in the Tudor period. ...


Catherine Howard in artwork

Painters continued to include Jane Seymour in pictures of King Henry VIII years after she was dead, because Henry continued to look back on her with favour as the one wife who gave him a son; most of them copied the portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger because it was the only full-sized picture available. In the opposite situation, after Catherine Howard was executed, even the Howard family removed her picture from their family portrait gallery, because Henry never forgave her for her perfidy. Nobody dared make another portrait of her after she was dead. For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... A 1543 portrait miniature of Hans Holbein the Younger by Lucas Horenbout Holbeins 1533 painting The Ambassadors Hans Holbein the Younger (c. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ...


For centuries, a picture by Hans Holbein was believed to be the only existing portrait of Catherine. (The image, [2]NPG 1119, is owned by the National Portrait Gallery in London, titled as "Unknown woman, formerly known as Katherine Howard.") Some historians now doubt that the woman in the picture is Catherine. Historian Antonia Fraser has persuasively argued that the above portrait is of Jane Seymour's sister, Elizabeth Seymour. The woman bears a remarkable resemblance to Jane (especially around the chin) and is wearing the clothes of a widow, which Catherine never had occasion to wear. Furthermore, the age of the sitter is given as 21; however, Catherine never reached her 21st birthday. Even if we accept the earliest possible date for her birth 1520/1521, Catherine would not have turned 21 until late 1541 or 1542, by which time she was either imprisoned or dead. A 1543 portrait miniature of Hans Holbein the Younger by Lucas Horenbout Holbeins 1533 painting The Ambassadors Hans Holbein the Younger (c. ... The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in St Martins Place, London, England, which opened to the public in 1856. ... Elizabeth Seymour (?1513 - 1563) was one of the many children and the second daughter of Sir John Seymour, her sisters being Jane, Margery (who died in 1520) and Dorothy. ...


There is another portrait allegedly of Catherine, a watercolour miniature (see above); it has been dated (from details about how she is dressed and how the miniature is made) to the short period when Catherine was queen. In it she is wearing jewels remarkably similar to those Jane Seymour was wearing in her official portrait; these were jewels the records show belonged to the crown, not to any queen personally, and there is no record of their having been removed from the treasury and given to anyone else. The only other possibility is that the portrait shows Henry's Scottish niece, Lady Margaret Douglas, the mother-in-law of Mary Queen of Scots. So, whilst it is almost certain that the portrait is not Catherine Howard, but rather Henry's sister-in-law, Elizabeth Seymour, the miniature shown above right is quite likely to be Henry's unlucky fifth queen. Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox (October 8, 1515 – March 7, 1578) was the daughter of Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus, and Margaret Tudor, Queen Dowager of Scotland. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ...


In film

  • Catherine first appeared on the silver screen in 1926, in the silent film Hampton Court Palace, played by Gabrielle Morton.
  • In 1933, in The Private Life of Henry VIII, she was played by Binnie Barnes. In this comedy of manners, Catherine chooses to abandon love and ambitiously sets out to seduce the king. Her tragedy comes upon falling in love with the debonair and devoted Thomas Culpepper. Catherine's story dominates the film.
  • American actress Dawn Addams made a 10-second appearance as the doomed queen in the 1952 romantic film Young Bess, with Charles Laughton as Henry VIII, Stewart Granger as Thomas Seymour and Jean Simmons as Elizabeth I.
  • In 1970, Angela Pleasance played Catherine in a 90-minute BBC television drama, as part of the series The Six Wives of Henry VIII, opposite Keith Michell as Henry VIII, Patrick Troughton as the duke of Norfolk and Sheila Burrell as Lady Rochford. In this version of events, a shrill, indulgent, cruel, hedonistic Catherine uses the naïve Culpepper to try and get herself pregnant in order to secure her position.
  • Catherine Howard made a cameo appearance, played by Monika Dietrich, in the 1971 slapstick British comedy Carry On Henry, with Sid James as Henry VIII. Two years later, Lynne Frederick portrayed Queen Catherine in Henry VIII and his Six Wives opposite Keith Michell as Henry VIII.
  • In 1998 Emilia Fox played Catherine in Katherine Howard at the Chichester Festival Theatre, Chichester, England.
  • In 2001, Michelle Abrahams played Catherine in Dr. David Starkey's television documentary on Henry's queens.
  • In 2003, Emily Blunt gave a more sympathetic portrayal of Catherine in the ITV television drama Henry VIII which focused on Catherine's sexual escapades. Once again, her adultery was explained by her relatives' desire for her to get pregnant. Catherine is shown crying and screaming with fear at her execution; contemporary accounts suggest she died in a more dignified manner.

A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... British-American actress who began her acting career in the 1923 and continued till 1973. ... Dawn Addams (21 September 1930- 7 May 1985) was a glamorous leading lady in motion pictures. ... Young Bess is a 1953 film about the early career of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Stewart Granger (May 6, 1913 – August 16, 1993) was an English film actor, mainly associated with heroic and romantic leading roles. ... Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley Thomas Seymour, Baron Seymour of Sudeley (c. ... Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons in Angel Face Jean Merilyn Simmons (born January 31, 1929 in Crouch Hill, London, England, United Kingdom) is a British actress. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Angela Pleasence (born Chapeltown, Yorkshire) is an English actress. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with The Six Wives of Henry VIII (documentary), a more recent Channel 4 documentary series on the subject by David Starkey. ... Keith Michell (born 1 December 1928) is an Australian actor. ... Patrick George Troughton (25 March 1920 – 28 March 1987) was a versatile and prolific English actor known in his role as the second incarnation of the Doctor in the long running British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which he played from 1966 until 1969. ... For other uses, see Slapstick (disambiguation). ... Sid James Sid James (8 May 1913–26 April 1976) was a film and television actor. ... Lynne Maria Frederick (July 25, 1954 – April 27, 1994) was an English actress. ... Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972) is the only feature-length film to deal with all six of King Henry VIIIs wives (other television movies have divided the story up into two or six parts. ... Emilia Rose Elizabeth Fox (born July 31, 1974 in London, England) is a British actress possibly best known for her role as pathologist Nikki Alexander in television series Silent Witness, having joined the cast on the departure of Amanda Burton. ... David Robert Starkey (born January 3, 1945) is one of Englands best-known historians, and a specialist in the Tudor period. ... A television documentary is a documentary or a series of documentaries that are meant to be broadcasted on television. ... Emily Olivia L. Blunt (born February 23, 1983) is a Golden Globe Award-winning English actress best known for her work in the films My Summer of Love and her appearance as Emily Charlton in The Devil Wears Prada and she was nominated for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture on... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... Henry VIII was a 2003 ITV drama based on the life of Henry VIII of England. ...

Trivia

Olympic Rower Sir Matthew Pinsent is a distant direct relative of Catherine Howard. Sir Matthew Clive Pinsent CBE (born 10 October 1970) is an English rowing champion, four-time Olympic gold medallist and broadcaster. ...


Notes

  1. ^ There are several different spellings of "Catherine" that were in use during the 16th century and by historians today. Her one surviving signature spells her name "Katheryn" but such a spelling is no longer used. Her chief biographer, Lacey Baldwin Smith, uses the common modern spelling "Catherine"; other historians, for example Antonia Fraser, use the traditional English spelling of "Katherine".
  2. ^ Eleanor Herman, Sex with the Queen, William Morrow, 2006. ISBN 0-06-084673-9. See pages 81-82.
  3. ^ B Alison Weir, Six Wives of Henry VIII, Grove Presws, 2000. ISBN 0-8021-3683-4. See page 475.
  4. ^ Lord Edmund Howard, Catherine Howard's father, was the brother of Lady Elizabeth Howard, mother of Anne Boleyn (second wife of Henry VIII of England), making Catherine Howard and Anne Boleyn first cousins.
  5. ^ Lundy, Darryl, thePeerage, <http://www.thepeerage.com/p10151.htm#i101503>. Retrieved on October 28, 2007
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Lundy, Darryl, thePeerage, <http://www.thepeerage.com/p10299.htm#i102981>. Retrieved on October 28, 2007
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Lundy, Darryl, thePeerage, <http://www.thepeerage.com/p10299.htm#i102982>. Retrieved on October 28, 2007
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Lundy, Darryl, thePeerage, <http://www.thepeerage.com/p10765.htm#i107648>. Retrieved on October 28, 2007
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Lundy, Darryl, thePeerage, <http://www.thepeerage.com/p340.htm#i3391>. Retrieved on October 28, 2007

LORD EDMUND HOWARD BORN: between 1472 and 1497 DIED: 19 March 1539. ... Lady Elizabeth Howard, later Elizabeth Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire (c. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ...

Bibliography

  • Katherine Howard by Jessica Smith (1972)
  • Divorced, Beheaded, Survived: Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII by Karen Lindsey (1995) (ISBN 0-201-40823-6)
  • Six Wives : The Queens of Henry VIII (reprinted 2004) by David Starkey (ISBN 0-06-000550-5)
  • The Six Wives of Henry VIII by Alison Weir (1993) (ISBN 0-8021-3683-4)
  • A Tudor tragedy: The life and times of Catherine Howard by Lacey Baldwin Smith (1961)
  • Katherine Howard: A Tudor Conspiracy by Joanna Denny (2005)
  • Sex with the Queen by Eleanor Herman (2006) (ISBN 0-06-084673-9)

David Robert Starkey (born January 3, 1945) is one of Englands best-known historians, and a specialist in the Tudor period. ... Alison Weir (born 1951) is a British writer of history books for the general public, mostly in the form of biographies about British kings and queens. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

English royalty
Preceded by
Anne of Cleves
Queen Consort of England
28 July 154013 February 1542
Succeeded by
Catherine Parr
Persondata
NAME Howard, Catherine
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Queen Consort of Henry VIII
DATE OF BIRTH ca. 15201525
PLACE OF BIRTH
DATE OF DEATH February 13, 1542
PLACE OF DEATH London, England

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tudor Herstory: Catherine Howard (1013 words)
Catherine probably appeared in the King's court around the age of 19 as a lady of honor to Anne of Cleves.
Catherine's affairs before her marriage to Henry were discovered and allegations were made that she had not come to be his wife as purely as Henry had thought.
When Catherine was made aware of charges of treason against her, she broke out into hysterics and denied any and all accusations against her.
Catherine Howard: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (3085 words)
Catherine Howard (born between 1520 and 1525; died February 13, 1542) was the fifth queen consort of Henry VIII of England (1540-1542), and sometimes known by his reference to her as "the rose without a thorn." Her birthdate and place of birth is unknown, (occasionally cited as 1521, probably in London).
However, Catherine's marital conduct and past sexual history were known to be unchaste, and she was beheaded after less than two years of marriage on the grounds of treason.
Catherine was imprisoned in Syon House, Middlesex, through the winter of 1541 and stripped of her title as queen on November 22.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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