FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Catch phrases

A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is spontaneously popularized after a critical amount of widespread repeated usage in everyday conversation (i.e., it "catches" on). Also called a memetic phrase, catch phrases often originate in popular culture (such as motion pictures and television), and typically spread through a variety of media, as well as word of mouth. A catch phrase’s defining features are its sudden, spontaneous, and widespread public reception, and its adopted use by the public, often to its own amusement. This is a list of memetic phrases that are not quite idioms or figures of speech (usually pop culture references) but that are so widely used outside of their original environment that people who dont know their origin can be expected to encounter them. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in any given society. ...

Contents


What makes a catch phrase stick

A sign that such a phrase has caught on is its use in many sectors of society — political, social, and cultural. Catch phrases usually decline in popularity after a time, but this is not always the case. The term "Manifest Destiny", for example, was a catch phrase of the mid-nineteenth century, coined by journalist John O'Sullivan in an editorial in 1845. The phrase spread so quickly that people soon forgot who first introduced the term. In time, "Manifest Destiny" ceased to be a catch phrase, instead becoming a standard historical term, and a permanent part of the lexicon of U.S. history. This painting (circa 1872) by John Gast called American Progress is an allegorical representation of Manifest Destiny. ... John Louis OSullivan (1813-1845) was a American newspaper journalist who is thought to have coined the term manifest destiny to encourage US expansionism. ... An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news, as the latter should ideally be done without bias. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Look up lexicon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Some catch phrases derive from misquotations that are so commonly cited they become generally assumed to be correct. Two of the most common modern examples from the not-so-recent past are “Play it again, Sam” (falsely attributed to Casablanca) and “Beam me up, Scotty” (Star Trek). Others only catch on within specific sub-cultures. In more recent times, many such catch phrases have propagated through the Internet. The catch phrase “All your base are belong to us”, from a poorly-translated Japanese video game, is one such example. This article is about the film. ... Beam me up, Scotty! is a catch phrase that made its way into pop culture from the television series Star Trek. ... Star Trek collectively refers to an American science-fiction franchise spanning six unique television series (which comprise 726 episodes) and ten feature films, in addition to hundreds of novels, computer and video games, fan stories, and other works of fiction — all of which are set within the same fictional universe... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The well-known phrase is a piece of subtitled dialogue from the introduction to Zero Wing. ...


Some catch phrases originate as a slogan in an advertising campaign. The catch phrase “Where's the beef?” became popular in the U.S. as a result of a successful 1984 commercial for Wendy's, a hamburger restaurant chain. Advertising slogans that do not catch on with the public do not, by definition, become catch phrases, and soon become lost to history. Look up Slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ... The picture sleeve of a Wheres the Beef single, recorded by Coyote McCloud and Clara Peller, based on her legendary advertisement Wheres the beef? is a catch phrase, which has, since it its first usage, become a somewhat universal, all-purpose phrase questioning the substance of an idea... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wendys is a chain of fast food restaurants based in Dublin, Ohio and owned by the American corporation Wendys International, Inc. ...


The trademark catch phrase

Some catch phrases become the "trademark" or defining characteristic of the person or character with whom they originated. A notable example is the catch phrase (actually catch word) “D'oh”, the trademark exclamation of Homer Simpson from the long-running animated series The Simpsons. This expostulation has now been added to some dictionaries. A classic “trademark” catch phrase is “Ehh… what's up, Doc?”, which is identified with the Looney Tunes / Merrie Melodies’ star character, Bugs Bunny. Bugs usually intones this wry inquiry quite nonchalantly, pausing at the ellipsis, while idly munching on a carrot. Doh! is the comical catch phrase of Homer Simpson, from the long running animated series The Simpsons. ... Homer Jay Simpson (voiced by Dan Castellaneta) is one of the main characters in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox network. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the Figure of speech, see Ellipsis (figure of speech). ...


In the professional wrestling arena, catch phrases are often essential to a wrestler’s gimmick. Some, such as The Rock’s “Can you smell what The Rock is cookin’” and "Stone Cold" Steve Austin’s “Austin 3:16” and “That’s the bottom line, 'cause Stone Cold said so” achieved exceptional popularity. These phrases have proceeded to symbolize pro wrestling itself, even after the active careers of their associated star figures have ended. Professional wrestling is generally any form of wrestling in which the wrestlers receive payment for participating. ... In professional wrestling, a gimmick is slang that refers to a wrestlers on-screen personality. ... Dwayne Douglas Johnson (foreground) is an actor and former professional wrestler known as The Rock. ... Stone Cold redirects here. ...


Pronunciation is often essential to a catch word or phrase. For example, U. S. sports announcer Marv Albert’s “Yes!” is a catch word mainly due to his distinctive enunciation of that word, and those who imitate or parody it normally attempt to duplicate the announcer’s style. Another example, coincidentally using the same word, would be Frank Nelson's uttering of "Yeeeeeeesssss?" (also parodied in The Simpsons). Another classic example from mid-20th century Hollywood slapstick comedy is associated with Curly Howard, a member of the Three Stooges: his ebullient enunciation of the word “certainly” almost always comes out as: “SOYT-en-ly!” Pronunciation refers to: the way a word or a language is usually spoken; the manner in which someone utters a word. ... Marv Albert (born Marvin Philip Aufrichtig on June 12, 1941 in Brooklyn, New York) is a television and radio sportscaster, honored for his work as a member in the Basketball Hall of Fame. ... Frank Nelson was an American born comedic actor best known for playing put-upon foils on radio and television. ... Promotional still of Curly Howard from the film Nutty But Nice (1940). ... The Three Stooges were an American comedy act in the 20th century. ...


See also

This is a list of catch phrases, i. ... This is a list of personal signature phrases, distinctive lines used by a person or fictional character that are associated with the character. ... Snowclone is a neologism used to describe a type of formula-based cliché which uses an old idiom in a new context. ... This is a list of memetic phrases that are not quite idioms or figures of speech (usually pop culture references) but that are so widely used outside of their original environment that people who dont know their origin can be expected to encounter them. ...

For further reading

Partridge, Eric (1894-1979) ed. Beale. A Dictionary of Catch Phrases, American and British, from the sixteenth century to the present day (enlarged trade paperback edition) Lanham, Maryland: Scarborough House, 1992 ISBN 0-8128-8536-8


External links

  • Livejournal's Catch Phrase Community
  • Biography of Eric Partridge, noted lexicographer and compiler of english-language catch phrases at partridge-slang.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Catch Phrases (401 words)
First, consider the phrase "when all is said and done." Once, this phrase was clever and original, but so many millions of writers and speakers have used it so many times over so many years that the phrase has become automatic and nearly meaningless.
This type of worn-out phrase is called a catch phrase, and you should always avoid it in your writing, unless you are quoting someone else: you own, original words are always more interesting.
A particularly stale catch phrase -- especially one which was once particularly clever -- is a cliché.
Catch phrase (655 words)
A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is spontaneously popularized after a critical amount of widespread repeated usage in everyday conversation (i.e., it "catches" on).
The term "Manifest Destiny", for example, was a catch phrase of the mid-nineteenth century, coined by journalist John O'Sullivan in an editorial in 1845.
In the professional wrestling arena, catch phrases are often essential to a wrestler’s gimmick.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m