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Encyclopedia > Catania
Comune di Catania

Municipal coat of arms
Country Italy
Region Sicily
Province Catania (CT)
Mayor Umberto Scapagnini (since May 17, 2005)
Elevation m (23 ft)
Area 180 km² (69 sq mi)
Population (as of January 1, 2006)
 - Total 304,144
 - Density 1,690/km² (4,377/sq mi)
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 37°31′N, 15°04′E
Gentilic Catanesi
Dialing code 095 001000
Postal code 95100
Frazioni Acquicella, Barriera Del Bosco, Bicocca, Borgo Rurale Pantano d'Arci, San Giovanni Galermo
Patron St. Agatha
 - Day February 5
Website: www.comune.catania.it
The Roman Odeon.
Catania Duomo. Giovanni Battista Vaccarini's principal façade (1736) is an example of the city's Sicilian Baroque architecture.
Piazza Duomo (Cathedral Square) in Catania.
The Baroque interior of the church of St. Benedict.

Catania (Greek: ΚατάνηKatánē; Latin: Catana and Catina[1]; Arabic: Balad-al-Fil or Medinat-al-Fil, Wadi Musa and Qataniyah) is the second-largest city of Sicily, southern Italy, and is the capital of the province which bears its name. Image File history File links Catania-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Catania (Italian: Provincia di Catania) is a province in the autonomous island region of Sicily in Italy. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Agatha (died AD 251) is a Christian saint. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 597 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Catania ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 597 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Catania ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 376 KB) Author : Urban Description : Duomo (cathédrale), Catane, Sicilia Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Catania Sicilian Baroque ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 376 KB) Author : Urban Description : Duomo (cathédrale), Catane, Sicilia Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Catania Sicilian Baroque ... Giovanni Battista Vaccarini was born in Palermo in 1702, he did in 1768 He was a Sicilian architect, notable for his work in the Baroque style in his homeland during the period of massive rebuilding following the earthquake of 1693. ... Illustration 1: Sicilian Baroque. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 914 KB) Summary it: Catania - Piazza del Duomo - Gennaio 2006 - Foto di Giovanni DallOrto (User:G.dallorto). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 914 KB) Summary it: Catania - Piazza del Duomo - Gennaio 2006 - Foto di Giovanni DallOrto (User:G.dallorto). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (752x943, 307 KB) Author : Urban Description : Chiesa San Benedetto, Catane, Sicilia Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Sicilian Baroque ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (752x943, 307 KB) Author : Urban Description : Chiesa San Benedetto, Catane, Sicilia Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Sicilian Baroque ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Arabic is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Catania (Italian: Provincia di Catania) is a province in the autonomous island region of Sicily in Italy. ...


With some 306,000 inhabitants (750,000 in the metropolitan area) it has the second highest population density on the island. The city's patron saint is Saint Agatha. Catania is located on the east coast of the island, halfway between Messina and Siracusa and is at the foot of the active volcano Mount Etna. Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Saint Agatha (died AD 251) is a Christian saint. ... Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... Map of central Mediterranean Sea, showing location of Syracuse on the island of Sicily. ... Etna redirects here. ...

u Liotru is the city's symbol.

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 350 KB) Author : Urban Description : Fontana Dell elefante, Catania, Sicilia Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Catania Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 350 KB) Author : Urban Description : Fontana Dell elefante, Catania, Sicilia Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Catania Metadata This...

History

Foundation

All ancient authors agree in representing Catania as a Greek colony named Κατάνη (Katánē—see also List of traditional Greek place names) of Chalcidic origin, but founded immediately from the neighboring city of Naxos, under the guidance of a leader named Euarchos (Euarchus). The exact date of its foundation is not recorded, but it appears from Thucydides to have followed shortly after that of Leontini (modern Lentini), which he places in the fifth year after Syracuse, or 730 BCE. (Thuc. vi. 3; Strabo vi. p. 268; Scymn. Ch. 286; Scyl. § 13; Steph. B. s. v.) This is a list of traditional Greek place names. ... Coordinates 38°28′ N 23°36′ E Country Greece Periphery Central Greece Prefecture Euboea Population 53,584 source (2001) Area 30. ... Naxos or Naxus (Ancient Greek ), was an ancient city of Sicily, on the east coast of the island between Catana (modern Catania) and Messana (modern Messina). ... Bust of Thucydides residing in the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. ... Leontini (mod. ... Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC 750s BC 740s BC - 730s BC - 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC Events and Trends 739 BC - Hiram II becomes king of Tyre 738 BC - King Tiglath-Pileser III... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... Scymnus of Chios (fl. ... Scylax Of Caryanda, Carian explorer. ... Stephanus Byzantinus (Stephanus of Byzantium), the author of a geographical dictionary entitled Εθνικα (Ethnica), of which, apart from some fragments, we possess only the meagre epitome of one Hermolaus. ...


Greek Sicily

The only event of its early history which has been transmitted to us is the legislation of Charondas, and even of this the date is wholly uncertain. But from the fact that his legislation was extended to the other Chalcidic cities, not only of Sicily, but of Magna Graecia also, as well as to his own country (Arist., Pol. ii. 9), it is evident that Catania continued in intimate relations with these kindred cities. It seems to have retained its independence till the time of Hieron of Syracuse, but that despot, in 476 BCE, expelled all the original inhabitants, whom he established at Leontini, while he repeopled the city with a new body of colonists, amounting, it is said, to not less than 10,000 in number, and consisting partly of Syracusans, partly of Peloponnesians. He at the same time changed its name to Αἴτνη (Aítnē, Aetna or Ætna, after the nearby volcano), and caused himself to be proclaimed the Oekist or founder of the new city. As such he was celebrated by Pindar, and after his death obtained heroic honors from the citizens of his new colony. (Diod. xi. 49, in 66; Strab. l.c.; Pind. Pyth. i., and Schol. ad loc.) But this state of things was of brief duration, and a few years after the death of Hieron and the expulsion of Thrasybulus, the Syracusans combined with Ducetius, king of the Siculi, to expel the newly settled inhabitants of Catania, who were compelled to retire to the fortress of Inessa (to which they gave the name of Aetna), while the old Chalcidic citizens were reinstated in the possession of Catania, 461 BCE. (Diod. xi. 76; Strab. l. c.) Charondas (Greek Χαρονδας), a celebrated lawgiver of Catania in Sicily. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Hiero I was the brother of Gelo and tyrant of Syracuse from 478 to 467 BC. In succeeding Gelo, he conspired against a third brother Polyzelos. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 481 BC 480 BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC _ 476 BC _ 475 BC... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... For the PINDAR military bunker in London, please see the PINDAR section of Military citadels under London Pindar (or Pindarus, Greek: ) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was a Greek lyric poet. ... Diodorus Siculus was a Greek historian, born at Agyrium in Sicily (now called Agira, in the province of Enna). ... Thrasybulus was a short-lasting tyrant who ruled Syracuse for eleven months[1] during 466 and 465 BC. He was the brother of the the previous tyrant Hiero , who seized power of Syracuse by convincing Gelons son to give up his claim to Syracusean power and instead pursue a... Ducetius (died 440 BC) was a Hellenized-leader of the Sicels and founder of a united Sicilian state and numerous cities. ... According to Thucydides (vi:2), before the arrival of Greek colonists, the Sicels (or Siculi) were one of the three tribes who inhabited Sicily: the Sicels (Greek Sikeloi) in eastern Sicily (as well as southern Italy), who spoke an Indo-European language, and the Sicani (Greek Sikanoi) and Elymi (Greek... Aetna (Ancient Greek: ), was an ancient city of Sicily, situated at the foot of the mountain of the same name, on its southern declivity. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC - 461 BC - 460 BC 459 BC...


The period which followed the settlement of affairs at this epoch appears to have been one of great prosperity for Catania, as well as for the Sicilian cities in general: but we have no details of its history till the great Athenian expedition to Sicily (part of the larger Peloponnesian War). On that occasion the Catanaeans, notwithstanding their Chalcidic connections, at first refused to receive the Athenians into their city: but the latter having effected an entrance, they found themselves compelled to espouse the alliance of the invaders, and Catania became in consequence the headquarters of the Athenian armament throughout the first year of the expedition, and the base of their subsequent operations against Syracuse. (Thuc. vi. 50-52, 63, 71, 89; Diod. xiii. 4, 6, 7; Plut. Nic. 15, 16.) We have no information as to the fate of Catania after the close of this expedition: it is next mentioned in 403 BCE, when it fell into the power of Dionysius I of Syracuse, who sold the inhabitants as slaves, and gave up the city to plunder; after which he established there a body of Campanian mercenaries. These, however, quitted it again in 396 BCE, and retired to Aetna, on the approach of the great Carthaginian armament under Himilco and Mago. The great sea-fight in which the latter defeated Leptines, the brother of Dionysius, was fought immediately off Catania, and the city apparently fell, in consequence, into the hands of the Carthaginians. (Diod. xiv. 15, 58, 60.) But we have no account of its subsequent fortunes, nor does it appear who constituted its new population; it is only certain that it continued to exist. Callippus, the assassin of Dion, when he was expelled from Syracuse, for a time held possession of Catania (Plut. Dion. 58); and when Timoleon landed in Sicily we find it subject to a despot named Mamercus, who at first joined the Corinthian leader but afterwards abandoned his alliance for that of the Carthaginians, and was in consequence attacked and expelled by Timoleon. (Diod. xvi. 69; Plut. Timol. 13, 30-34.) Catania was now restored to liberty, and appears to have continued to retain its independence; during the wars of Agathocles with the Carthaginians, it sided at one time with the former, at others with the latter; and when Pyrrhus landed in Sicily, Catania was the first to open its gates to him, and received him with the greatest magnificence. (Diod. xix. 110, xxii. 8, Exc. Hoesch. p. 496.) A view of the Acropolis of Athens during the Ottoman period, showing the buildings which were removed at the time of independence The history of Athens is the longest of any city in Europe: Athens has been continuously inhabited for at least 3,000 years. ... The Sicilian Expedition was an Athenian expedition to Sicily from 415 BC to 413 BC, during the Peloponnesian War. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 408 BC 407 BC 406 BC 405 BC 404 BC - 403 BC - 402 BC 401 BC... Dionysius I or Dionysius the Elder (ca. ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC Years: 401 BC 400 BC 399 BC 398 BC 397 BC - 396 BC - 395 BC 394 BC... Aetna (Ancient Greek: ), was an ancient city of Sicily, situated at the foot of the mountain of the same name, on its southern declivity. ... Roman Carthage with former military harbor Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in Tunisia and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Mago (Greek: ) was commander of the Carthaginian fleet under Himilco in the war against Dionysius I of Syracuse, 396 BCE. He is particularly mentioned as holding that post in the great sea-fight off Catania, when he totally defeated the fleet of the Syracusans under Leptines, the brother of Dionysius... Leptines (Greek: ) was a military leader from Syracuse, Sicily, active during his brother Dionysius the Elders wars. ... Calippus of Syracuse Callippus (or Calippus) (ca. ... Euphimism for the word gay. ... Timoleon (c. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... For the grindcore band, see Agathocles (band) Agathocles (361 BC - 289 BC), tyrant of Syracuse (317 BC - 289 BC) and king of Sicily (304 BC - 289 BC). ... Pyrrhus of Epirus Pyrrhus (318-272 BC) (Greek: Πύρρος) was one of the most successful ancient Greek generals of the Hellenistic era. ...


Roman rule

In the First Punic War, Catania was one of the first among the cities of Sicily, which made their submission to the Romans, after the first successes of their arms in 263 BCE. (Eutrop. ii. 19.) The expression of Pliny (vii. 60) who represents it as having been taken by Valerius Messala, is certainly a mistake. It appears to have continued afterwards steadily to maintain its friendly relations with Rome, and though it did not enjoy the advantages of a confederate city (foederata civitas), like its neighbors Tauromenium (modern Taormina) and Messana (modern Messina), it rose to a position of great prosperity under the Roman rule. Cicero repeatedly mentions it as, in his time, a wealthy and flourishing city; it retained its ancient municipal institutions, its chief magistrate bearing the title of Proagorus; and appears to have been one of the principal ports of Sicily for the export of corn. (Cic. Verr. iii. 4. 3, 83, iv. 23, 45; Liv. xxvii. 8.) It subsequently suffered severely from the ravages of Sextus Pompeius, and was in consequence one of the cities to which a colony was sent by Augustus; a measure that appears to have in a great degree restored its prosperity, so that in Strabo's time it was one of the few cities in the island that was in a flourishing condition. (Strab. vi. pp. 268, 270, 272; Dion Cass. iv. 7.) It retained its colonial rank, as well as its prosperity, throughout the period of the Roman Empire; so that in the fourth century Ausonius in his Ordo Nobilium Urbium, notices Catania and Syracuse alone among the cities of Sicily. (Plin. iii. 8. s. 14; Ptol. iii. 4. § 9; Itin. Ant. pp. 87,90, 93, 94). Osama was here and he doesnt enjoy this site???? the red sox won and i am one happy camper. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC Years: 268 BC 267 BC 266 BC 265 BC 264 BC - 263 BC - 262 BC 261 BC... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Isola Bella from the North Isola Bella Bay from the south Greek theatre in Taormina Taormina is a small town in the island of Sicily in Italy. ... Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... For other uses, see Cicero (disambiguation). ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Sextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey, was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC). ... A Roman colonia (plural coloniae) was originally a Roman outpost established in conquered territory to secure it. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Dio Cassius Cocceianus (155–after 229), known in English as Dio Cassius or Cassius Dio, was a noted Roman historian and public servant. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Decimus Magnus Ausonius (c. ...


After the fall of the Roman Empire

In 535, Catania was recovered by Belisarius from the Goths, and became again, under the rule of the Byzantine Empire, one of the most important cities of the island. (Procop. B. G. i. 5.). It was extensively destroyed by earthquakes in 1169 and 1693 and by lava flows which ran over and around it into the sea. The first Sicilian university was founded there in 1434. Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... // Flavius Belisarius (505(?) – 565) was one of the greatest generals of the Byzantine Empire and one of the most acclaimed generals in history. ... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Procopius of Caesarea (in Greek Προκόπιος, c. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... Events Nur ad-Din invades Egypt, and his nephew Saladin becomes the sultan over the territory conquered by Nur ad-Din. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... The University of Catania (Italian: Università di Catania) is a university located in Catania, Italy, and founded in 1434. ... Events May 30, Battle of Lipany in the Hussite Wars Jan van Eyck paints the wedding of Giovanni Arnoflini The Honorable Passing of Arms at the bridge of Obrigo The Portuguese reach Cape Bojador in Western Sahara. ...


Locational significance

The position of Catania at the foot of Mount Etna was the source, as Strabo remarks, both of benefits and evils to the city. For on the one hand, the violent outbursts of the volcano from time to time desolated great parts of its territory; on the other, the volcanic ashes produced a soil of great fertility, adapted especially for the growth of vines. (Strab. vi. p. 269.) One of the most serious calamities of the former class was the eruption of 121 BCE, when great part of its territory was overwhelmed by streams of lava, and the hot ashes fell in such quantities in the city itself, as to break in the roofs of the houses. Catania was in consequence exempted, for 10 years, from its usual contributions to the Roman state. (Oros. v. 13.) The greater part of the broad tract of plain to the southwest of Catania (now called the Piano di Catania, a district of great fertility), appears to have belonged, in ancient times, to Leontini or Centuripa (modern Centuripe), but that portion of it between Catana itself and the mouth of the Symaethus, was annexed to the territory of the latter city, and must have furnished abundant supplies of corn. The port of Catania also, which was in great part filled up by the eruption of 1669, appears to have been in ancient times much frequented, and was the chief place of export for the corn of the rich neighboring plains. The little river Amenanus, or Amenas, which flowed through the city, was a very small stream, and could never have been navigable. Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC Years: 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC 123 BC 122 BC - 121 BC - 120 BC 119 BC... Centuripe (formerly Centorbi) is a town in the Enna province of Sicily. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ...


Catania's renown in antiquity

Catania was the birth-place of the philosopher and legislator Charondas; it was also the place of residence of the poet Stesichorus, who died there, and was buried in a magnificent sepulchre outside one of the gates, which derived from thence the name of Porta Stesichoreia. (Suda, under Στησίχορος.) Xenophanes, the philosopher of Elea, also spent the latter years of his life there (Diog. Laert. ix. 2. § 1), so that it was evidently, at an early period, a place of cultivation and refinement. The first introduction of dancing to accompany the flute, was also ascribed to Andron, a citizen of Catania (Athen. i. p. 22, c.); and the first sundial that was set up in the Roman forum was carried thither by Valerius Messala from Catania, 263 BCE. (Varr. ap. Plin. vii. 60.) But few associations connected with Catania were more celebrated in ancient times than the legend of the Pii Fratres, Amphinomus and Anapias, who, on occasion of a great eruption of Etna, abandoned all their property, and carried off their aged parents on their shoulders, the stream of lava itself was said to have parted, and flowed aside so as not to harm them. Statues were erected to their honor, and the place of their burial was known as the Campus Piorum; the Catanaeans even introduced the figures of the youths on their coins, and the legend became a favorite subject of allusion and declamation among the Latin poets, of whom the younger Lucilius and Claudian have dwelt upon it at considerable length. The occurrence is referred by Hyginus to the first eruption of Etna that took place after the settlement of Catania. (Strab. vi. p. 269; Paus. x. 28. § 4; Conon, Narr. 43; Philostr. Vit. Apoll. v. 17; Solin. 5. § 15; Hygin. 254; Val. Max. v. 4. Ext. § 4; Lucil. Aetn. 602-40; Claudian. Idyll. 7; Sil. Ital. xiv. 196; Auson. Ordo Nob. Urb. 11.) Stesichorus (, lit. ... Suda (Σουδα or alternatively Suidas) is a massive 10th century Byzantine Greek historical encyclopædia of the ancient Mediterranean world. ... Xenophanes of Colophon (Greek: Ξενοφάνης, 570 BC-480 BC) was a Greek philosopher, poet, and social and religious critic. ... Elea (Velia by the Romans; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was a Greek coastal city founded around 540 BC in Lucania in southern Italy, 15 miles southeast of the Gulf of Salerno. ... Andron (Gr. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC Years: 268 BC 267 BC 266 BC 265 BC 264 BC - 263 BC - 262 BC 261 BC... In Greek mythology, Amphinomus, also Amphínomos (literally grazing all about), was the son of King Nisos and one of the suitors of Penelope that was killed by Odysseus. ... Lucilius is the nomen of the gens Lucilia of ancient Rome. ... Claudius Claudianus, Anglicized as Claudian, was the court poet to the Emperor Honorius and Stilicho. ... Hyginus can refer to: Gaius Julius Hyginus (c. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Silius Italicus, in full Titus Catius Silius Italicus (AD 25 or 26 - 101), was a Latin epic poet. ...


Main sights

Roman age

The symbol of the city is u Liotru, or the Fontana dell'Elefante and was constructed in 1736 by Giovanni Battista Vaccarini. It is made of lava stone portraying an elephant and surmounted by an obelisk. Legend has it that Vaccarini's original elephant was neuter, which the men of Catania took as an insult to their virility. To appease them, Vaccarini appended appropriately elephantine testicles to the original statue. The Sicilian name u Liotru is perhaps a deformation of Heliodorus . A similar sculpture is in Piazza Santa Maria della Minerva in Rome. Giovanni Battista Vaccarini was born in Palermo in 1702, he did in 1768 He was a Sicilian architect, notable for his work in the Baroque style in his homeland during the period of massive rebuilding following the earthquake of 1693. ... Sicilian (, Italian: ) is a Romance language. ... Facade of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


The city has been buried by lava a total of seven times in recorded history, and in layers under the present day city are the Roman city that preceded it, and the Greek city before that. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Many of the ancient monuments of the Roman city have been destroyed by the numerous earthquakes. Currently, remains of the following buildings can be seen:

  • The Theater (2nd century)
  • The Odeon (3rd century CE)
  • The Amphitheater (2nd century)
  • The Greek Acropolis of Montevergine's Hill
  • The Roman Aqueduct's Ruins
  • The Roman Forum in Piazza San Pantaleone
  • Roman ruins in Cortile Archirotti
  • Several Christian basilicas, hypogea, Roman burial monuments and Catacombs in some urban areas.
  • The Roman Columns in Piazza Giuseppe Mazzini

Roman thermal structures:

  • Terme Achilliane or Terme Achillee
  • Terme dell'Indirizzo
  • Terme dell'Idria
  • Terme della Rotonda
  • Terme dei Quattro Canti
  • Terme di Palazzo Asmundo
  • Terme del Palazzo dell'Università
  • Terme di Casa Gagliano
  • Terme della Chiesa di Sant'Antonio Abate

Baroque and historical churches

  • Saint Agatha's Cathedral (Duomo di Sant'Agata)
  • Saint Agatha's Abbey (Badia di Sant'Agata)
  • Saint Placid (Chiesa di San Placido)
  • Saint Joseph at the Duomo (Chiesa di San Giuseppe al Duomo)
  • Saintest Sacrament at the Duomo (Chiesa del Santissimo Sacramento al Duomo)
  • San Martino dei Bianchi
  • Saint Agatha the Vetust (Chiesa di Sant'Agata la Vetere)
  • Saint Agatha at the Furnace or Saint Blaise (Chiesa di Sant'Agata alla Fornace or San Biagio)
  • Saint Prison's Church (Chiesa del Santo Carcere)
  • St. Francis of Assisi at The Immaculate (Chiesa di San Francesco d'Assisi all' Immacolata) , housing the mortal remains of Queen Eleanor of Sicily.
  • St. Benedict (Chiesa di San Benedetto)
  • the Collegiate Basilica (early 18th century). The Basilica Collegiata is on the Latin cross plan with a nave and two aisles. The high altar has a Madonna icon, probably of Byzantine manufacture.
  • Saint Mary of Ogninella (Chiesa di Santa Maria dell'Ogninella)
  • Saint Michael the Lesser (Chiesa di San Michele Minore)
  • Saint Michael Archangel or Minorites' Church (San Michele Archangelo or Chiesa dei Minoriti)
  • Saint Julian (Chiesa di San Giuliano)
  • Saint Teresa (Chiesa di Santa Teresa)
  • Saint Francis Borgia or Jesuits' Church (San Francesco Borgia or Chiesa dei Gesuiti)
  • Saint Mary of Jesus (Chiesa di Santa Maria di Gesù 16th century)
  • Saint Dominic or Saint Mary the Great (Chiesa di San Domenico or Santa Maria la Grande)
  • Purity or Visitation (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Purità or Chiesa della Visitazione)
  • the Madonna of Graces' Chapel (Cappella della Madonna delle Grazie)
  • Saint Ursula (Chiesa di Sant'Orsola)
  • Saint Agatha at the Lavic Runnels (Chiesa di Sant'Agata alle Sciare)
  • Saint Euplius Old Church Ruins (Ruderi della Vecchia Chiesa di Sant'Euplio)
  • Saint Cajetan at the Caves (Chiesa di San Gaetano alle Grotte)
  • the Basilica of The Saintest Mary Annunciated of Carmel (Basilica di Maria Santissima Annunziata al Carmine)
  • Saint Agatha at the Borough (Chiesa di Sant'Agata al Borgo). The "Borough" (il Borgo) is an inner district of Catania.
  • Saint Nicholas at the Borough (Chiesa di San Nicola al Borgo)
  • Saintest Sacrament at the Borough (Chiesa del Santissimo Sacramento al Borgo)
  • Saint Mary of Providence at the Borough (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Provvidenza al Borgo)
  • the Hospice of the Blind's Chapel (Cappella dell'Ospizio dei Ciechi)
  • Saint Camillus of The Crossbearers (Chiesa di San Camillo dei Crociferi)
  • Saint Nicholas the Arena's Benedictine Monastery (Monastero Benedettino di San Nicola l'Arena)
  • Saint Nicholas the Arena (Chiesa di San Nicola l'Arena)
  • Saint Mary of Guidance (Chiesa di Santa Maria dell'Indirizzo)
  • Saint Clare (Chiesa di Santa Chiara)
  • Saint Sebastian Martyr (Chiesa di San Sebastiano)
  • Saint Anne (Chiesa di Sant'Anna)
  • Marian Sanctuary of Saint Mary of Help (Santuario di Santa Maria dell'Aiuto)
  • Holy House of Loreto (Chiesa della Madonna di Loreto)
  • Saint Joseph at Transit (Chiesa di San Giuseppe al Transito)
  • Immaculate Conception of Little Minors(Chiesa dell'Immacolata Concezione dei Minoritelli)
  • Saint Agatha by Little Vergins' Conservatory (Chiesa di Sant'Agata al Conservatorio delle Verginelle)
  • Saint Mary of Itria or Saint Mary Hodigitria (Chiesa di Santa Maria dell'Idria o Odigitria).Hodigitria is a Greek word meaning "She who shows the Way".
  • Saint Philip Neri (Chiesa di San Filippo Neri)
  • Saint Martha (Chiesa di Santa Marta)
  • Saint Child (Chiesa del Santo Bambino)
  • Saint Mary of Providence (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Provvidenza)
  • Saint Beryl in Saint Mary of the Diseased (Chiesa di San Berillo in Santa Maria degli Ammalati)
  • Madonna of the Poor (Chiesa della Madonna dei Poveri)
  • Saint Vincent de Paul (Chiesa di S.Vincenzo de'Paoli)
  • Saint John The Baptist (Chiesa di San Giovanni Battista) in the suburb of San Giovanni di Galermo
  • Saint Anthony Abbot (Chiesa di Sant'Antonio Abate)
  • Little Saviour Byzantine Chapel (Cappella Bizantina del Salvatorello)
  • Saint Augustine (Chiesa di Sant'Agostino)
  • Holy Trinity (Chiesa della Saintissima Trinità)
  • Little Virgins (Chiesa delle Verginelle)
  • Saint Mary of the Rotunda (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Rotonda)
  • Saintest Refound Sacrament (Chiesa del Santissimo Sacramento Ritrovato)
  • Saint Mary in Ognina (Chiesa di Santa Maria in Ognina)."Ognina" is a maritime quarter of Catania.
  • Saint Mary of Montserrat (Chiesa di Santa Maria di Monserrato)
  • Saint Mary of Health (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Salute)
  • Saint Mary of La Salette (Chiesa di Santa Maria de La Salette)
  • Saint Mary of Mercy or Saint Mary of Merced (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Mercede)
  • Saint Catherine at the Sandfield (Chiesa di Santa Caterina al Rinazzo)
  • Saint Mary of Concord (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Concordia)
  • Saint Mary of the Guard (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Guardia)
  • Saint Mary of Consolation (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Consolazione)
  • Saintest Crucifix of Marjoram (Chiesa del Santissimo Crocifisso Maiorana)
  • Crucifix of Miracles (Chiesa del Crocifisso dei Miracoli)
  • Crucifix of Good Death (Chiesa del Crocifisso della Buona Morte)
  • Saint Mary of La Mecca (Chiesa di Santa Maria della Mecca). La Mecca is not the Saudiarabian Holy City, but a vernacular Catanian word that identifies a "silk mill" that existed, in effect, in its vicinity.
  • Saint Cajetan at the Marina (Chiesa di San Gaetano alla Marina)
  • Saintest Redeemer (Chiesa del Santissimo Redentore)
  • Saint Francis of Paola (Chiesa di San Francesco di Paola)
  • Divine Maternity (Chiesa della Divina Maternità)
  • the Chapel of Mary Auxiliatrix (Cappella di Maria Ausiliatrice)
  • Chapel of Sacred Heart of Jesus (Cappella del Sacro Cuore di Gesù)
  • Sacro Cuore al Fortino
  • Saints George and Denis (Chiesa dei Santi Giorgio e Dionigi)
  • Sacro Cuore ai Cappuccini
  • Saint Christopher (Chiesa di San Cristoforo)
  • Saints Cosmas and Damian (Chiesa dei Santi Cosma e Damiano)
  • Saint Mary of Succour or Saint Mary of the Palm (Chiesa di Santa Maria del Soccorso or Santa Maria della Palma)
  • Saint Vitus (Chiesa di San Vito)
  • Saint Guardian Angels (Chiesa dei Santi Angeli Custodi)
  • Saintest Saviour (Chiesa del Santissimo Salvatore)

The Duomo of Florence, Santa Maria del Fiore Front of Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore the Duomo Duomo is a generic Italian term for a cathedral church. ... Our Lady of Graces (Italian - Madonna delle Grazie or Nostra Signora delle Grazie) or St Mary of Graces (Italian - Santa Maria delle Grazie) is a devotion to the Virgin Mary in the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Palaces

  • Biscari Palace
  • Elephants Palace
  • Palazzo del Seminario dei Chierici
  • Palazzo Pardo
  • Palazzo Marletta
  • Archbishopric's Palace
  • Palazzo dell'Università
  • Palazzo di Sangiuliano
  • Palazzo Gioeni
  • Palazzetto Biscari
  • Palazzo Massa di San Demetrio
  • Palazzo Magnano di San Lio
  • Palazzo Cosentino
  • Palazzo Manganelli
  • Palazzo Minoriti o Palazzo del Governo
  • Palazzo Cilestri
  • Palazzo del Toscano
  • Palazzo Tezzano
  • Palazzo Beneventano
  • Palazzo della Borsa
  • Palazzo Del Grado
  • Palazzo delle Poste
  • Palazzo Pancari
  • Palazzo Libertini
  • Palazzo del Collegio dei Gesuiti
  • Palazzo Asmundo
  • Palazzo Villaroel
  • Villa Cerami or Palazzo Cerami
  • Palazzo Ingrassìa
  • Reburdone Palace
  • Palazzo Serravalle
  • Palazzo Valle
  • Palazzo Hernandez
  • Casa del Vaccarini
  • Palazzo Cutelli
  • Palazzo Bonajuto
  • Palazzi dell'Archivio di Stato
  • Palazzo Mazza
  • Palazzo Bicocca
  • Palazzo Gravina Cruyllas
  • Palazzo Bruca
  • Palazzo Valsavoja
  • Palazzo Trewhella
  • Palazzo Scammacca
  • Palazzo Clarenza di S.Domenico
  • Palazzo Recupero
  • Palazzo delle Scienze
  • Palazzo di Giustizia
  • Palazzo dei Delfini

Liberty style mansions

  • Villa Manganelli
  • Villa Bonajuto
  • Villa Majorana
  • Villa De Luca

Viale Regina Margherita's Manors:

  • Villa Trigona di Misterbianco
  • Villa Romeo delle Torrazze
  • Villa Cutore-Recupero
  • Villa Calì
  • Villa Cosentino
  • Villa Clementi
  • Villa Modica
  • Villa Giordano

Urban parks

  • Villa Bellini
  • Villa Pacini
  • Catania's Botanical Garden
  • Parco Giovanni Falcone (Giovanni Falcone's Park)
  • Parco Gioeni

Others

  • The Ursino Castle (il Castello Ursino), built by emperor Frederick II in the 13th century.
  • The Uzeda Gate (la Porta Uzeda)
  • The Gothic-catalan Arch of Saint John of Friars in Via Cestai (l'Arco Gotico-catalano di San Giovanni de' Freri in Via Cestai)
  • The Ferdinandean Gate or Garibaldi Gate (la Porta Ferdinandea), a triumphal arch erected in 1768 to celebrate the marriage of Ferdinand I of Two Sicilies and Marie Caroline of Austria
  • The Fortino's Gate (la Porta del Fortino)
  • The "Casa del Mutilato"

Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ... A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 – January 4, 1825). ... HM Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily Her Majesty Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily née Her Imperial & Royal Highness Archduchess Marie Caroline of Austria (13 August 1752- 8 September 1814) was queen consort and de facto ruler of Naples from 1768 to 1799 and from 1799...

The subterranean rivers

Under the city run the river Amenano, visible in just one point, south of Piazza Duomo and the river Longane or Lognina.


Culture

The opera composer Vincenzo Bellini was born in Catania, and a museum exists at his birthplace. The Teatro Massimo Bellini, which opened in 1890, is named after the composer. The opera house presents a variety of operas through a season, which run from December to May, many of which are the work of Bellini. This is a selective list of opera composers who have made the greatest impact on the modern operatic repertory. ... Vincenzo Bellini Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (November 3, 1801 – September 23, 1835) was an Italian opera composer. ... The Teatro Massimo Bellini is an opera house in Catania, Sicily which opened on 31 May 1890. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ...


In the late 1980s and 1990s Catania had a unique popular music scene with local radio stations. As a result of these idiosyncratic and regional radio stations Catania boasted a youth culture in which indie pop and indie rock from lesser known international bands like. As a result of the eclectic taste in indie pop and indie rock Catania has been the birthplace of a number of dynamic and unusual independent music record labels. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe genres, scenes, subcultures, styles and other cultural attributes in music, characterized by their independence from major commercial record labels and their autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ...


The city is the home of Amatori Catania rugby union team, and Calcio Catania football team. Amatori Catania is a Italian rugby union club currently competing in Super 10. ... Calcio Catania is an Italian football club founded in 1908 and are based in Catania, Sicily. ...


Transportation

Catania has a commercial seaport (Catania seaport) in the city, an international airport (Catania Fontanarossa) to the South, a central train station (Catania Centrale) on the main lines Messina-Syracuse, Catania-Gela and Catania-Palermo, as well as the privately owned small-gauge Circumetnea railway which runs for 110 km from Catania round the base of Mount Etna. It attains the height of 976 m above sea level before descending to rejoin the coast at Giarre-Riposto to the North. Catania-Fontanarossa Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Catania-Fontanarossa) (IATA: CTA, ICAO: LICC) is located in the south of Catania, the second largest city on the Italian island of Sicily. ... Location within Italy Messina with a population of about 260,000 is the third largest city on the island of Sicily, Italy and the capital of the province of Messina. ... Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Gela is a city in the province of Caltanissetta in the south of Sicily, Italy. ... For other uses, see Palermo (disambiguation). ... The Ferrovia Circumetnea (roughly translated as Railway around the Etna) is a narrow-gauge regional railway line in Sicily. ... Giarre is a town in the province of Catania, Sicily, southern Italy. ... Riposto is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Catania in the Italian region Sicily, located about 170 km east of Palermo and about 25 km northeast of Catania. ...


In the late 1990s/early 2000s the first line of an underground railway was built, but never completed, under the city, extending the Circumetnea from its stop on the north side of town to the Central Railway Station on the southeast. The Metropolitana di Catania is a subway system serving the city of Catania in Sicily. ...


Demographic evolution


Sister cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Grenoble (Arpitan: Grenoblo) is a city and commune in south-east France situated at the foot of the Alps where the Drac joins the Isère River. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ...

References

This article incorporates some information taken from http://www.hostkingdom.net/ with permission. Other material is translated from the Italian wikipedia site. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, published in 1854, was the last a series of classical dictionaries edited by the english scholar William Smith (1813–1893), which included as sister works the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Roman writers fluctuate between the two forms Catana and Catina, of which the latter is, perhaps, the most common, and is supported by inscriptions (Orell. 3708, 3778); but the analogy of the Greek Κατάνη, and the modern Catania, would point to the former as the more correct.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Catania
  • Catania home page
  • Catania tourist attractions
  • Radio Catania

Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Catania (566 words)
Catania, a seaport and capital of the province of the same name in Sicily, is situated on the eastern side of Mount Etna in a very fertile region.
Domninus, Bishop of Catania, was present at the Council of Ephesus (431); another bishop, Fortunatus, was twice sent with Ennodius by Pope Hormisdas to Emperor Anastasius I to effect the union of the Eastern Churches with Rome (514, 516).
The University of Catania was founded by Pope Eugenius IV in 1444 with the co-operation of Alfonso, King of Aragon and Sicily.
Catania, Italy (1267 words)
Catania, situated on level ground halfway along Sicily's eastern coast, is a provincial capital and the second largest city on the island after Palermo.
During the Byzantine period Catania was eclipsed by Syracuse and in the Arab period by Palermo.
Later on further natural catastrophes were to befall the town: in 1576 the majority of the population fell victim to the plague and in 1669 the western part of the town was destroyed by lava flows, whilst the rest was ruined by the great earthquake of 1693.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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