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Encyclopedia > Castration

Castration (also referred as: gelding, neutering, orchiectomy, orchidectomy, and oophorectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which a male loses the functions of the testes or a female loses the functions of the ovaries. Neutering, from the Latin neŭter (of neither type), is the removal of an animals reproductive organ, either all of it or a considerably large part of it. ... Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of the ovaries of a female animal. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ... Chemical castration is a form of temporary castration caused by certain hormonal drugs. ... This article is about the Male sex. ... Human male anatomy The testicles, known medically as testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ... For other uses, see Female (disambiguation). ... // For ovary as part of plants see ovary (plants) An ovary is an egg-producing reproductive organ found in female organisms. ...

Contents

Castration in humans

The practice of castration has its roots before recorded human history.[1] Castration was frequently used in certain cultures of Europe, the Middle East, India, Africa and China, for religious or social reasons. After battles in some cases, winners castrated their captives or the corpses of the defeated to symbolise their victory and 'seize' their power. Castrated men — eunuchs — were often admitted to special social classes and were used particularly to staff bureacracies and palace households: in particular, the harem. Castration also figured in a number of religious castration cults. Other religions, for example Judaism and Islam, were strongly opposed to the practice. The Leviticus Holiness code, for example, specifically excludes eunuchs or any males with defective genitals from the priesthood, just as castrated animals are excluded from sacrifice. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... European illustration of a Eunuch (1749) Chief Eunuch of Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II at the Imperial Palace, 1912. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ... For other uses, see Harem (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... The Holiness Code appears at Leviticus 17-26, and is so called due to its highly repeated use of the word Holy. ... Marcus Aurelius and members of the Imperial family offer sacrifice in gratitude for success against Germanic tribes: contemporary bas-relief, Capitoline Museum, Rome For other uses, see Sacrifice (disambiguation). ...



Eunuchs in China have been known to usurp power in many eras of Chinese history, most notably in the Later Han, late Tang and late Ming Dynasties. There are similar recorded Middle Eastern events. The history of China is told in traditional historical records that refer as far back as the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors about 5,000 years ago, supplemented by archaeological records dating to the 16th century BC. China is one of the worlds oldest continuous civilizations. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (202 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–190 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication to Cao Wei 220... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... For other uses, see Ming. ...


In ancient times, castration often involved the total removal of all the male genitalia. This involved great danger of death due to bleeding or infection and, in some states, such as the Byzantine Empire, was seen as the same as a death sentence. Removal of only the testicles had much less risk. A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those anatomical parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in a complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans... For other uses, see Bleeding (disambiguation). ... Byzantine redirects here. ...


In China, male castration of a person who entered the caste of eunuchs during imperial times involved the removal of the whole genitalia, that is, the removal of the testes, penis, and scrotum. The removed organs were returned to the eunuch to be interred with him when he died so that, upon rebirth, he could become a whole man again. The penis, testicles, and scrotum were euphemistically termed bǎo (寶) in Mandarin Chinese, which literally means 'precious treasure'. These were preserved in alcohol and kept in a pottery jar by the eunuch. [2]


Reasons

Medical

Testicular cancer is generally treated by surgical removal of the cancerous testicle(s) (orchidectomy), often followed by radiation or chemotherapy. Unless both testicles are cancerous, only one is removed. Testicular cancer is cancer that develops in the testicles, a part of the male reproductive system. ... For other uses, see Radiation (disambiguation). ... Chemotherapy is the use of chemical substances to treat disease. ...


Either surgical removal of both testicles or chemical castration may be carried out in the case of prostate cancer [3], as hormone testosterone-depletion treatment to slow down the cancer. Similarly, testosterone-depletion treatment (either surgical removal of both testicles or chemical castration) is used to greatly reduce sexual drive or interest in those with sexual drives, obsessions, or behaviors, or any combination of those that may be considered deviant.[4]. Castration in humans has been proposed, and sometimes used, as a method of birth control in certain poorer regions. Chemical castration is a form of temporary castration caused by certain hormonal drugs. ... HRPC redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hormone (disambiguation). ... Testosterone is a steroid hormone from the androgen group. ... Chemical castration is a form of temporary castration caused by certain hormonal drugs. ...


Male-to-female transsexuals, as well as some transgender people, often undergo physical castration. Castration can be done before, during, or in place of sex reassignment surgery. A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... A transgender woman at New York Citys gay pride parade Transgender (IPA: , from trans (Latin) and gender (English)) is a general term applied to a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies that diverge from the normative gender role (woman or man) commonly, but not always, assigned at... For specialized articles on surgical procedures, see Sex reassignment surgery male-to-female and Sex reassignment surgery female-to-male. ...


"Voluntary" chemical or surgical castration has been in practice in many countries—reports are available from American, Scandinavian, and European countries, in particular, for the past eighty-plus years (chemical for the last thirty or so years)—as an option for treatment for people who have broken laws of a sexual nature, allowing them to return to the community from otherwise lengthy detentions[citation needed]. The effectiveness and ethics of this treatment are heavily debated.


As punishment

Ancient Greek writings report Persian forces castrating defeated foes. Tamerlane was recorded to have castrated Armenian prisoners of war who had fought as allies of the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid I, while others were buried alive.[citation needed] For the chess engine Tamerlane, see Tamerlane. ...


Edward Gibbon's famous work Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire reports castration of defeated foes at the hands of the Normans. Castration has also been used in modern conflicts, as the Janjaweed militiamen currently (as of 2005) attacking citizens of the Darfur region in Sudan, often castrating villagers and leaving them to bleed to death [5]. Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... Norman conquests in red. ... A Janjaweed miltiaman mounted The Janjaweed (Arabic: جنجويد; variously transliterated Janjawid, Janjawed, Jingaweit, Jinjaweed, Janjawiid, Janjiwid, Janjaweit, etc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Darfur (disambiguation). ...


Sima Qian, the famous Chinese Historian, was castrated by order of the Emperor of China for dissent. Another famous victim of castration was the medieval French philosopher, scholar, teacher, and (later) monk Pierre Abélard, castrated by relatives of his lover, Héloïse. Sima Qian Si Ma Qian (司馬遷) (c. ... Abaelardus and Heloïse surprised by Master Fulbert, by Romanticist painter Jean Vignaud (1819) Pierre Abélard (in English, Peter Abelard) or Abailard (1079 – April 21, 1142) was a French scholastic philosopher. ... Abaelardus and Heloïse in a manuscript of Roman de la Rose (14. ...


Another famous castration victim was Bishop Wimund, a 12th Century English adventurer and invader of the Scottish coast. Wimund was an English bishop who became a sea-faring war-lord adventurer in the 1130s and 1140s. ...


When Zheng He was captured by the Ming Army as a child in 1381 he was castrated. He later became an admiral, who led a large fleet on several voyages of exploration. Some scholars, including Gavin Menzies, believe that his fleet reached the Americas in 1421. A modern illustration of Zheng He, by an unidentified artist. ... Gavin Menzies Gavin Menzies (b. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... For the controversial hypothesis advanced by Gavin Menzies, see: 1421 hypothesis. ...


A temporary chemical castration has been studied and developed as a preventive measure and punishment for several repeated sex crimes, such as rape or other sexually related violence.[6][7] Chemical castration was Alan Turing's punishment when he was convicted of "acts of gross indecency" (homosexuality) in 1952; it resulted indirectly in his suicide. Look up Punishment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sex crimes are forms of human sexual behavior that are crimes. ... Sexual assault is any physical contact of a sexual nature without voluntary consent. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


Physical castration appears to be highly effective as, historically, it results in a 20-year re-offense rate of less than 2.3% vs. 80% in the untreated control group, according to a large 1963 study involving a total of 1036 sex offenders by the German researcher A. Langelüddeke, among others [8], much lower than what was otherwise expected. Compare to overall sex offender recidivism rates. This article is about the criminal term. ...


Involuntary castration also appears in the history of warfare, sometimes used by one side to torture or demoralize their enemies. It was also practiced to extinguish opposing male lineages and thus allow the victor to sexually possess the defeated group's women. Involuntary castration under such circumstances involved excruciating pain and humiliation as well as various physical, social, and psychological consequences.


Sexual Play

Castration play is one of many fetishes within the BDSM community although it is not as well known by the mainstream. In Castration Play, one simulates the effects of castration without going all the way to cstration. However, it is not entirely false that castration does occasionally occur within the context of castration play. This can be for a number of reasons ranging from power play to emotional connection. [9]


For more information on castration play, please reference BM Ezine


For religious reasons

In Europe, when females were not permitted to sing in church or cathedral choirs in the Roman Catholic Church, boys were sometimes castrated to prevent their voices breaking at puberty and to develop a special high voice. The first documents mentioning castrati are Italian church records from the 1550s.[10] In the baroque music era these singers were highly appreciated by Opera composers as well. Famous castrati include Farinelli, Senesino, Carestini, and Caffarelli. The last castrato was Alessandro Moreschi (1858-1922) who served in the Sistine Chapel Choir.[11] However, in the late 1800s, the Roman Catholic Church, which had always considered castration to be mutilation of the body and therefore a severe sin, condemned the production of castrati; their castrations had been performed clandestinely in contravention of Church law. Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... Puberty refers to the process of physical changes by which a childs body becomes an adult body capable of reproduction. ... In music, a register is the relative height or range of a note, set of pitches or pitch classes, melody, part, instrument or group of instruments. ... A castrato is a male soprano, mezzo-soprano, or alto voice produced either by castration of the singer before puberty or one who, because of an endocrinological condition, never reaches sexual maturity. ... Farinelli, by Wagner after Amigoni 1735 Farinelli (January 24, 1705 – September 16, 1782), was the stage name of Carlo Broschi, one of the most famous Italian soprano castrato singers of the 18th century. ... Senesino (Francesco Bernardi) (1690?-1750?) was a celebrated Italian castrato who worked in London for some time. ... Giovanni Carestini (circa 1705 — circa 1759) was an Italian castrato opera singer. ... Caffarelli (March 8, 1710–July 4, 1783), an Italian castrato and opera singer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Although it is known that the Church, from her earliest days, employed music in her cult, it was not until the time of her emergence from the catacombs that she began freely to display her beauty and splendour in sacred song. ...


A number of religious cults have included castration as a central theme of their practice. These include In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ...

  • The cult of Cybele, in which devotees castrated themselves in ecstatic emulation of Attis: see Gallus.
  • Some followers of early Christianity considered castration as an acceptable way to counter sinful desires of the flesh. Origen is reported by Eusebius [12] to have castrated himself based on his reading of the Gospel of Matthew 19:12, although there is some doubt concerning this story (Schaff[citation needed] considers the account genuine but cites Baur et al.[citation needed] in opposition). Boston Corbett was likewise inspired by this same verse to castrate himself (Corbett was the 19th-century American soldier who is generally believed to have fired the shot that killed John Wilkes Booth.) Bishop Melito of Sardis (d. ca 180) was a eunuch, according to the church history of Eusebius of Caesarea, though, significantly the word "virgin" was substituted in Rufino's Latin translation of Eusebius.
  • Skoptzy
  • Heaven's Gate (cult)

On the contrary, Deuteronomy 23:1 expels castrated men from the assembly of Israel. A fountain in Madrid depicting Cybele in her chariot drawn by lions, in the Plaza de Cibeles Originally a Phrygian goddess, Cybele (Greek: Κυβέλη) was a deification of the Earth Mother who was worshipped in Anatolia from Neolithic times. ... Attis wearing the Phrygian cap. ... Galli was the Roman name for castrated followers of the Phrygian goddess Cybele, which can be regarded as transgendered in todays terms. ... Origen Origen (Greek: Ōrigénēs, 185–ca. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... Boston Corbett Thomas P. Boston Corbett (1832 – presumed dead 1894) was the Union Army soldier who shot and killed Abraham Lincolns assassin, John Wilkes Booth. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... Saint Melito of Sardis (died c. ... European illustration of a Eunuch (1749) Chief Eunuch of Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II at the Imperial Palace, 1912. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... Rufino is a city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The logo used by the Heavens Gate group Heavens Gate was the name of a cult co-led by Marshall Applewhite and Bonnie Nettles. ... Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. ...


Chemical

In the case of chemical castration, ongoing regular injections of anti-androgens are required. This article is about the treatment with sex steroids. ...


Chemical castration seems to have a greater effect on bone density than physical castration. Since the development of teriparatide, this severe bone loss has been able to be reversed in nearly every case. At this time there is a limitation on the use of this medication to 24 months until the long-term use is better evaluated. Teriparatide (Forsteo®) is a recombinant form of parathyroid hormone, used in the treatment of advanced osteoporosis. ...


With the advent of chemical castration, physical castration is not generally recommended by the medical community.


Medical consequences

A subject of castration who is castrated before the onset of puberty will retain a high voice, non-muscular build, and small genitals. They may well be taller than average, as the production of sex hormones in puberty—particularly testosterone—stops long bone growth. The person may not develop pubic hair and will have a small sex drive or none at all. Castrations after the onset of puberty will typically reduce the sex drive considerably or eliminate it altogether. Also castrated people are automatically sterile, because the testes (for males) and ovaries (for females) produce sex cells needed for sexual reproduction. Once removed the subject is infertile. The voice does not change. Some castrates report mood changes, such as depression or a more serene outlook on life. Body strength and muscle mass can decrease somewhat. Body hair sometimes may decrease. Castration prevents male pattern baldness if it is done before hair is lost; however, castration will not restore hair growth after hair has already been lost due to male pattern baldness. [13] Castration is never recommended by medical doctors as a way to prevent or treat hair loss. Castration eliminates the risk of testicular cancer, and it may even reduce prostate cancer.[citation needed] Puberty refers to the process of physical changes by which a childs body becomes an adult body capable of reproduction. ... Pubic hair is hair in the frontal genital area, the crotch, and sometimes at the top of the inside of the legs; these areas form the pubic region. ... Sterility is the quality or state of being unable to reproduce. ... Human male anatomy The testicles, known medically as testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ... Human female internal reproductive anatomy Ovaries are a part of a female organism that produces eggs. ... Gametes (in Greek: γαμέτες) —also known as sex cells, germ cells, or spores—are the specialized cells that come together during fertilization (conception) in organisms that reproduce sexually. ... Sexual reproduction is a union that results in increasing genetic diversity of the offspring. ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... Baldness (formally alopecia) is the state of lacking hair where it usually would grow, especially on the head. ...


Historically, eunuchs who additionally underwent a penectomy reportedly suffered from urinary incontinence associated with the removal of the penis, and they had their own specialist doctors. [14] Penectomy is the surgical removal of the penis for medical reasons. ...


Without Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT), typical symptoms (similar to those experienced by menopausal women) include hot flashes; gradual bone-density loss, resulting in osteopenia or osteoporosis; potential weight gain or redistribution of body fat to the hips/chest. In males, gynecomastia, the development of breast tissue, may also occur. Replacement of testosterone in the form of gel, patches, or injections can largely reverse these effects, although breast enlargement has also been reported as a possible side effect of testosterone usage [15].


Castration in psychoanalysis and literary theory

The concept of castration plays an important role in psychoanalysis; see, e.g., castration anxiety. Today psychoanalysis comprises several interlocking theories concerning the functioning of the mind. ... Castration anxiety is an idea put forth by Sigmund Freud in his writings on the Oedipus complex; it posits a deep-seated fear or anxiety in boys and men said to originate during the genital stage of sexual development. ...


Although castration literally means removal of the testes, in psychoanalytic terms the penis is seen as having more symbolic significance than the testes, and thus castration refers to the removal of the penis, and more so the removal of the phallus. And since the phallus is not merely the penis but rather the power and authority that the penis represents, any removal of that power is in effect a removal of the phallus even if the penis itself remains intact, and thus is castration. Thus, blindness, decapitation, dismemberment, mutilation, circumcision, rape, etc., can all be seen as forms of castration, for they all remove the phallus. This article is about the symbol of the erect penis. ... This article is about the symbol of the erect penis. ...


Women as lacking a penis and a phallus are always already castrated, and yet simultaneously there is also sometimes the idea that they can be castrated by the loss of power and authority.


Castration also plays an important role in psychoanalytically-influenced literary theory, for example Harold Bloom's The Anxiety of Influence. Poetry can also be seen as castrating, with male poets either being castrated through being outdone by their male predecessors (as in Bloom), or male poets (and even mere readers) being castrated by the force of the female sublime as conveyed to them through poetry (as in Maxwell). Catherine Maxwell identifies Philomela as being castrated by Tereus when he rapes and mutilates her. Harold Bloom (born July 11, 1930) is an American professor and prominent literary and cultural critic. ... The Anxiety of Influence is a book published in 1973 by Harold Bloom. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Itys, Procne and Tereus (Discuss) In Greek mythology, Philomela was a daughter of Pandion I, King of Athens and Zeuxippe and a sister of Procne. ...


Castration in veterinary practice

Castration is commonly performed on domestic animals not intended for breeding. Domestic animals are usually castrated in order to avoid unwanted or uncontrolled reproduction; to reduce or prevent other manifestations of sexual behaviour such as territorial behaviour or aggression (eg. fighting between groups of entire (uncastrated) males of a species); or to reduce other consequences of sexual behaviour that may make animal husbandry more difficult, such as boundary/fence/enclosure destruction when attempting to get to nearby females of the species. Biological reproduction is the biological process by which new individual organisms are produced. ...


Male horses are usually castrated (gelded), because stallions are rather aggressive and troublesome. The same applies to male mules, although they are sterile. Male cattle are castrated to improve muscling and docility for use as oxen. Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... A gelding is a castrated animal—in English, a castrated male horse. ... A stallion A stallion is a male horse that has not been castrated. ... For other uses, see Mule (disambiguation). ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ...


Breeding individuals are kept entire and used for breeding: they may fetch higher prices when sold. Selective breeding in domesticated animals is the process of developing a cultivated breed over time. ... In animal fancy and animal husbandry, entire indicates that an animal has not been desexed, i. ...


Livestock may be castrated when used for food in order to increase growth or weight or both of individual male animals and because the undesirable taste and odor of the meat from sexually mature male. In domestic pigs the taint is caused by androstenone and skatole concentrations stored in the fat tissues of the animal after sexual maturity.[16] It is released when the fat is heated and has a distinct odor and flavor that is widely considered unpalatable to consumers.[17] Consequently, in commercial meat production, male pigs are either castrated shortly after birth or slaughtered before they reach sexual maturity.[17] Recent research in Brazil has shown that castration of pigs is unnecessary because most pigs do not have the 'boar taint'. This is due to many breeds of pigs simply not having the heredity for the boar taint and the fact that pigs are normally slaughtered at a young market weight.[18] Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... Trinomial name Sus scrofa domestica Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Sus domestica The domestic pig (or in some areas hog) is normally given the scientific name Sus scrofa domestica, though some taxonomists use the term , reserving for the wild boar. ... chemical structure of androstenone Androstenone (5α-androst-16-en-4-one) is a steroid found in both male and female sweat and urine. ... Skatole or 3-methylindole is a mildly toxic white crystalline organic compound with chemical formula C9H9N and CAS number 83-34-1. ...


In the case of pets, castration is usually called spaying and neutering, and is encouraged to prevent overpopulation of the community by unwanted animals, and to reduced certain diseases such as prostate disease and testicular cancer in male dogs. Testicular cancer is rare in dogs, but prostate problems are somewhat common in unaltered male dogs when they get older. Neutered individuals have a much lower risk of developing prostate problems in comparison. Unaltered male cats are more likely to develop an obstruction in their urethea, preventing them from urinating to some degree; however neutering does not seem to make much difference statistically because many neutered toms also have the problem. A specialized vocabulary has arisen for neutered animals of given species: Neutering, from the Latin neÅ­ter (of neither type), is the removal of an animals reproductive organ, either all of it or a considerably large part of it. ...

  • Barrow (pig)
  • Bullock (cattle)
  • Capon (chicken)
  • Dinmont (sheep, goat)
  • Gelding (horse)
  • Gib (cat, ferret)
  • Havier (deer)
  • Lapin (rabbit)
  • Stag (cattle, sheep, horse)
  • Steer (cattle)
  • Wether (sheep, goat)


Methods of veterinary castration include instant surgical removal, the use of an elastrator tool to secure a band around the testicles that disrupts the blood supply, the use of a Burdizzo tool or emasculators to crush the spermatic cords and disrupt the blood supply, pharmacological injections and implants and immunological techniques to inoculate the animal against its own sexual hormones. For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... A Bullock is a castrated bull. ... A capon, soon to be roasted for a Christmas dinner. ... A gelding is a castrated animal—in English, a castrated male horse. ... The term gib may refer to: a castrated male cat or ferret an abbreviation for gibibyte (GiB) or gibibit (Gib) an abbreviation for Gibraltar an abbreviation for Gib Board, itself an abbreviation of Gibraltar Board, all Winston Wallboards[1] tradenames for drywall (plasterboard). ... Lapin can mean: A castrated rabbit. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Example EU engergy label According to an EU Directive most white goods and light bulb packaging must have an EU Energy Label clearly displayed when offered for sale or rent. ... For other uses, see sheep (disambiguation). ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... Surgery Surgery is the medical specialty that treats diseases or injuries by operative manual and instrumental treatment. ... Burdizzois a castration method that uses a large clamp to crush the blood vessels leading into the testicles. ... Cutting edge diagram An emasculator is a tool used in the gelding of horses. ... Male Anatomy The spermatic cord is the name given to the cord-like structure formed by the vas deferens and surrounding tissue (veins, arteries, nerves, and lymphatic vessels) that run from the abdomen down to each testicle. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... An injection is a method of putting liquid into the body with a hollow needle and a syringe which is pierced through the skin to a sufficient depth for the material to be forced into the body. ... The term implant has different meanings: in Scientology, see Implant (Scientology) in medicine, see prosthesis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. ... Inoculation, originally Variolation, is a method of purposefully infecting a person with smallpox (Variola) in a controlled manner so as to minimise the severity of the infection and also to induce immunity against further infection. ... Hormone is also the NATO reporting name for the Soviet/Russian Kamov Ka-25 military helicopter. ...


Certain animals, like horses and swine, are usually surgically treated with a scrotal castration (which can be done with the animal standing while sedated and after local anaesthetic has been applied), while others, like dogs and cats, are anaesthetised and recumbent when surgically castrated with a pre-scrotal incision in the case of dogs, or a pre-scrotal or scrotal incision used for cats. Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms The domestic pig is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, though some authors call it , reserving for the wild boar. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ...


In veterinary practice an "open" castration refers to a castration in which the inguinal tunic is incised and not sutured. A "closed" castration refers to when the procedure is performed so that the inguinal tunic is sutured together after incision.


Miscellaneous

Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... Marcus Aurelius and members of the Imperial family offer sacrifice in gratitude for success against Germanic tribes: contemporary bas-relief, Capitoline Museum, Rome For other uses, see Sacrifice (disambiguation). ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... A priesthood is a body of priests, shamans, or oracles who are thought to have special religious authority or function. ... HRPC redirects here. ... A parasite is an organism that spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of a host organism and which causes harm to the host without immediately killing it. ... Classes Adenophorea    Subclass Enoplia    Subclass Chromadoria Secernentea    Subclass Rhabditia    Subclass Spiruria    Subclass Diplogasteria    Subclass Tylenchia The nematodes or roundworms (Phylum nematoda from Greek (nema): thread + -ode like) are one of the most common phyla of animals, with over 80,000 different described species (over 15,000 are parasitic). ... Species M. piriformes Synonyms Microphallus is a genus of parasitic trematodes (flukes) in the family Microphallidae. ...

See also

A castrato is a male soprano, mezzo-soprano, or alto voice produced either by castration of the singer before puberty or one who, because of an endocrinological condition, never reaches sexual maturity. ... European illustration of a Eunuch (1749) Chief Eunuch of Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II at the Imperial Palace, 1912. ... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ... Spaying and neutering are the respective processes of female and male animal sterilization, in order to keep them from producing offspring. ... Castration anxiety is an idea put forth by Sigmund Freud in his writings on the Oedipus complex; it posits a deep-seated fear or anxiety in boys and men said to originate during the genital stage of sexual development. ... Transgender is a very complex topic, where consensual and precise definitions have not yet been reached. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Ashley Treatment refers to a controversial set of medical procedures undergone by a Seattle child, Ashley X. Ashley, born in 1997, was a child with severe developmental disabilities due to static encephalopathy of unknown etiology. ... A gelding is a castrated animal—in English, a castrated male horse. ... A tool used in the gelding of horses. ...

External links

  • Castration Through the Ages
  • Questions often asked about castration by Sherry
  • The Journal of Clinical Endrocrinology and Metabolism
  • Neutering NOT Org Website arguing against the castration of domestic animals
  • Eunuch.org Website for eunuchs and people with castration fetishes/fantasies. Includes a database of erotic stories, discussion forums, and more.
  • Elastrator
  • Boar taint in pigs selected for components of efficient lean growth rate

On religious castration

  • Susan Elliott, Cutting Too Close for Comfort: Paul's Letter to the Galatians in Its Anatolian Cultic Context Reviews in Review of Biblical Literature [2]

Notes

  1. ^ On Target, July 27 2003. On Target (newsletter). Target Health, Inc. (2003-07-27). Retrieved on 2007-04-30. Section II: HISTORY OF MEDICINE
  2. ^ The eunuchs of the Chinese court
  3. ^ MaleCare.com
  4. ^ Immune system 'stops conception'
  5. ^ In Darfur, My Camera Was Not Nearly Enough
  6. ^ Katherine Amlin. Chemical Castration: The Benefits and Disadvantages Intrinsic to Injecting Male Pedophiliacs with Depo-Provera. Retrieved on 2007-06-13.
  7. ^ 'Chemical castration' OK'd for Montana inmates. N.Y. Times News Service (1997). Retrieved on 2007-06-13.
  8. ^ http://www.brainphysics.com/research/ocpara_bradford99.html "THE PARAPHILIAS, OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE SPECTRUM DISORDER, AND THE TREATMENT OF SEXUALLY DEVIANT BEHAVIORS" by J. M. W. Bradford
  9. ^ http://eunuchinfo.com/reasons.html
  10. ^ John Rosselli, "Castrato" article in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 2001.
  11. ^ "All Mouth and No Trousers" from The Guardian, Aug 5 2002.
  12. ^ NPNF2-01. Eusebius Pamphilius: Church History, Life of Constantine, Oration in Praise of Constantine
  13. ^ Hamilton JB. Effect of castration in adolescent and young adult males upon further changes in the proportion of bare and hairy scalp. J Clin Endocrinol metab 1960; 20:1309-1315.
  14. ^ http://www.medspe.fr/site/templates/template.php?identifiant_article=2166&surlignage=2&PHPSESSID=bd0a2427de5e5665b9c541ca8a6ecc71
  15. ^ http://www.healthandage.com/public/health-center/28/article/3047/gm=20!gid2=2824 "HRT for Men Is Risky, Too" by Robert W. Griffith, MD.
  16. ^ Genetics of Boar Taint: Implications for the Future Use of Intact Males
  17. ^ a b Genetic Inhibition of Boar Odor in Meat
  18. ^ http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2005/11/to-cut-or-not.html
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:Castration

  Results from FactBites:
 
CastrationEffects (2467 words)
Castration is a bad idea for anyone merely seeking to treat or prevent hair loss because it causes so many other effects that the vast majority of men dislike.
I strongly suspect that castration did reduce my blood pressure, though I am not sure if it was a direct reaction or if because I was emotionally antagonistic to testosterone (please do not get castrated just to reduce high blood pressure, there are less drastic ways to treat that).
Castration is a minor procedure, but it is a permanent one and is something you can never change your mind on.
Castration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1772 words)
Castration (also referred as: gelding, neutering, orchiectomy, and orchidectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which a biological male loses use of the testes.
Castration was frequently used in certain cultures, such as in Europe, the Middle East, India, Africa and China, for religious or social reasons.
Castration is common in animal husbandry and animal fancy, where it is intended for favouring a given desired development of the animal or of its habits.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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