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Encyclopedia > Castor and Pollux

In Greek mythology the Dioskouroi (Διόσκουροι), Kastor and Polydeuces (Κάστωρ και Πολυδεύκης), in Roman mythology the Gemini (Latin, "twins") or Castores, Castor and Pollux are the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. According to Liddell and Scott's Lexicon, kastor is Greek for "he who excels", and poludeukeis means "very sweet". Deena Kastor (née Drossin) (1973-) is an American distance runner. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Leda and the Swan, 16th-century copy after the lost painting by Michelangelo Leda with the Swan, by Correggio In Greek mythology, Leda (Λήδα) was daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius, and wife of the king Tyndareus, of Sparta. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Clytemnestra trying to awake the Erinyes while her son is being purified by Apollo, Apulian red-figure krater, 480–470 BC, Louvre (Cp 710) After the murder (1882 painting) Clytemnestra (or Clytaemestra) ‘‘(Eng. ...

Contents

Origins

Silver tetradrachm of the Greco-Bactrian King Eucratides I (171-145 BC) with the Dioscuri.
Obv: Bust of Eucratides. Helmet decorated with a bull's horn and ear.
Rev: The Dioscuri, each holding palm in left hand, spear in right hand. Greek legend: BASILEOS MEGALOU EUKRATIDOU "of Great King Eucratides".

They are called the Dioscuri (dios kouroi), meaning the "youths of Zeus". Their Vedic parallels in the effulgent brother horsemen Asvin sets them firmly in the Indo-European tradition (Burkert 1985:212). Their archaic and inexplicable name in Spartan inscriptions Tindaridai or in literature Tyndaridai occasioned an explanatory myth of a Tyndareus (Burkert 1985:212), occasioning incompatible accounts of their parentage, as that for their sisters Helen and Clytemnestra. The better known story is that Zeus disguised himself as a swan and seduced Leda. Thus Leda's children are frequently said to have hatched from two eggs that she then produced. The Dioscuri can be recognized in vase-paintings by the skull-cap they wear, the pilos, which was already explained in Antiquity as the remnants of the egg from which they hatched.[1] Tyndareus, Leda's mortal husband, is then father or foster-father to the children.[2] Whether the children are thus mortal and which half-immortal is not consistent among accounts, nor is whether the twins hatched together from one egg. In some accounts, only Polydeuces was fathered by Zeus, while Leda and her husband Tyndareus conceived Castor. This explains why they were granted an alternate immortality. It is a common belief that one would live among the gods, while the other was among the dead. They do make an appearance together in the play, Helen and Electra. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2259x1063, 350 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2259x1063, 350 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... Approximate extent of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom circa 220 BCE. The Greco-Bactrians were a dynasty of Greek kings who controlled Bactria and Sogdiana, an area comprising todays northern Afghanistan and parts of Central Asia, the easternmost area of the Hellenistic world, from 250 to 125 BCE. Their expansion... King Eucratides (171-145 BC) Obv: Bust of Eucratides. ... Map of early Iron Age Vedic India after Witzel (1989). ... In Hinduism, the Asvins are the twin sons of Saranya, who is a goddess of the dawn and wife of either Surya or Vivasvat. ... For other uses, see Indo-European. ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Leda and the Swan, 16th-century copy after the lost painting by Michelangelo Leda with the Swan, by Correggio In Greek mythology, Leda (Λήδα) was daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius, and wife of the king Tyndareus, of Sparta. ... A Phrygian cap The Phrygian cap or Bonnet Phrygien is a soft, red, conical cap with the top pulled forward, worn in antiquity by the inhabitants of Phrygia, a region of central Anatolia. ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ...


Castor and Polydeuces are sometimes both mortal, sometimes both divine. One consistent point is that if only one of them is immortal, it is Polydeuces. In Homer's Iliad, Helen looks down from the walls of Troy and wonders why she does not see her brothers among the Achaeans. The narrator remarks that they are both already dead and buried back in their homeland of Lacedaemon, thus suggesting that at least in some early traditions, both were mortal. Their death and shared immortality offered by Zeus was material of the lost Cypria in the Epic cycle. title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ... The Epic Cycle (Greek: Επικός Κύκλος) was a collection of Ancient Greek epic poems that related the story of the Trojan War, which includes the Kypria, the Aithiopis, the Little Iliad, the Iliou persis (The Sack of Troy), the Nostoi (Returns), and the Telegony. ...


As a further complication, the Zeus-as-swan myth is sometimes associated with the goddess Nemesis. In this tradition, it was Nemesis who was seduced and who laid the egg, but the egg was then found by or given to Leda. However, this story is usually associated with Helen, ordained by Zeus to cause the Trojan War, and not with Castor and Polydeuces. Note: This article contains special characters. ...

The Dioscuri of the Campidoglio, Rome, wearing their distinctive caps

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,112 × 2,816 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,112 × 2,816 pixels, file size: 1. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the famous seven hills of Rome, the site of a temple for the Capitoline Triad: the gods Jupiter, his wife Juno and their daughter Minerva. ...

Connections with Sparta

The Dioscuri and their sisters grew up in Sparta, in the household of Tyndareus (see above). Their connection there was very ancient: a uniquely Spartan aniconic representation of the Tyndaridai was as two upright posts joined by a cross-bar.[3] Sparta's unique dual kingship reflects the divine influence of the Dioscuri. When the Spartan army marches to war, one king remains behind at home, accompanied by one of the Twins. "In this way the real political order is secured in the realm of the Gods" (Burkert 1985:212). For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ...


Their heroon or grave-shrine was at Therapne across the Eurotas from Sparta. Therapnes (Θεράπνες) is a municipality in Laconia, Greece. ... Eurotas is the name of a river in the region of the Peloponnesus in Greece. ...


Dioscuri as adventurers

They accompanied Jason on the Argo; during the voyage, Polydeuces killed King Amycus in a boxing match. This article is about the hero from Greek mythology. ... The Argo, painting by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcus to retrieve the Golden Fleece. ... Amycus punished, red-figured Lucanian hydria, end of 4th century BC, Cabinet des Médailles In Greek mythology, Amycus was the son of Poseidon and Melia. ...


When Astydameia, queen of Iolcus, offended Peleus, the twins assisted him in ravaging her country. In Greek mythology, Astydameia was the Queen of Iolcus and wife of Acastus. ... Iolcos (also known as Iolkos or Iolcus, Greek: Ιώλκος) was an ancient city in Thessaly, central-eastern Greece (near the modern city of Volos). ... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ...


Dioscuri as saviours

When Theseus and Pirithous kidnapped their sister Helen and carried her off to Aphidnae, the twins rescued her and counter-abducted Theseus' mother, Aethra. The mounted horsemen who rode out to save their abducted sister Helen from Theseus could be expected to show up to succour their votaries, as when the Locrians of Magna Graecia attributed their success at a legendary battle on the banks of the Sagras to the intervention of the Twins. Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... In Greek mythology, Pirithous (also transliterated as Perithoos or Peirithoos) was the King of the Lapiths and husband of Hippodamia. ... Afidnes (Greek, Modern: Αφίδνες, Ancient/Katharevoussa: Αφίδναι), older forms: Afidnai, Afidne, Latin: Aphidnae, sometimes incorrectly as Aphidna or Afidna is a suburb in Attica, Greece just about 28 km north of Athens. ... In Greek mythology, Aethra was a daughter of King Pittheus of Troezena and, with Aegeas, or in some versions, Poseidon, mother of Theseus. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... Locri Epizephyri (epi-Zephyros, under the West wind; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was founded about 680 BC on the Italian shores of the Ionian Sea, near modern Capo Zefirio, by the Locrians, apparently by Opuntii (East Locrians) from the city of Opus, but including Ozolae (West... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ...


Dioscuri in the service of the Goddess

The image of the twins attending a goddess are widespread[4] and link the Dioscuri with the male societies of initiates under the aegis of the Anatolian Great Goddess[5] and the great gods of Samothrace. The Dioscuri are the inventors of war dances, which characterize the Kuretes. A fountain in Madrid depicting Cybele in her chariot drawn by lions, in the Plaza de Cibeles Originally a Phrygian goddess, Cybele (Greek: Κυβέλη) was a deification of the Earth Mother who was worshipped in Anatolia from Neolithic times. ... Coordinates 40°29′ N 25°31′ E Country Greece Periphery East Macedonia and Thrace Prefecture Evros Population 2,723 source (2001) Area 178. ... The Korybantes, called the Kurbantes in (Phrygia), are the crested dancers who worship the Phrygian goddess Cybele with drumming and dancing. ...

"Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus" by Rubens.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (891x950, 171 KB)Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (891x950, 171 KB)Source: http://www. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ...

Mortality and immortality

Castor and Polydeuces abducted the Leucippides ("white horses") Phoebe and Hilaeira,[6] the daughters of Leucippus (mythology). When they encountered their analogous twin brothers of Thebes, Idas and "lynx-eyed" Lynceus, bound for revenge, Castor, the mortal brother, fell, and Polydeuces, the immortal twin, survived, yet they were not separated. Polydeuces persuaded Zeus to share his gift with Castor. Accordingly, the two spend alternate days as gods on Olympus, worthy of burnt sacrifice, and as deceased mortals in Hades, whose spirits must be propitiated by libations. // Phoebe or Phebe may refer to: Phoebe (mythology), one of the original Titans One of the Heliades Phoebe, the daughter of Leucippus Another name for Artemis Helens sister, daughter of Leda As for Melissa, a person of rare beauty Phebe, a shepherdess in Shakespeares As You Like It... [[LIES]] In Greek mythology, Hilaeira was a daughter of Leucippus and Philodice. ... In Greek mythology, Leucippus, son of Gorgophone and Perieres, was the father of Phoebe and Hilaeira Castor and Polydeuces abducted and married Phoebe and Hilaeira, the daughters of Leucippus. ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... In Greek mythology, Idas was a son of Aphareus and Arene and brother of Lynceus. ... For other persons named Lynceus, see Lynceus (disambiguation). ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... A holocaust is a religious sacrifice that is completely consumed by fire. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Libation scene, Greek red figure cup, c. ...


The lost Cypria explained the terms of their joint immortality as a gift of Zeus. In Odyssey, Homer renders the paradox: The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ...

both buried now in the life-giving earth though still alive.
Even under the earth Zeus grants them that distinction:
one day alive, the next day dead, each twin by turns
they both hold honours equal to the gods"
(Robert Fagles' translation)

As emblems of immortality and death that were no longer polar opposites, it is not surprising to hear that the Dioscuri, like Heracles were said to have been initiated at Eleusis.[7] Robert Fagles is a Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University. ... Alcides redirects here. ... The Eleusinian Mysteries (Greek: Ἐλευσίνια Μυστήρια) were initiation ceremonies held every year for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based at Eleusis in ancient Greece. ...

The Dioscuri on the reverse of a coin of the Roman Emperor Maxentius

Image File history File links Follis-Maxentius-s3776. ... Image File history File links Follis-Maxentius-s3776. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius ( 278-28 October 312) was Western Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. ...

Roman Castor and Pollux

Castor and Pollux fighting at the Battle of Lake Regillus, 1880 illustration by JR Weguelin to the Lays of Ancient Rome by Thomas Macaulay

As early as 484 BCE, a temple to the Castores was erected in the Roman Forum in gratitude for their supposed intervention in the Battle of Lake Regillus. Their festival was celebrated on July 15. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,738 × 1,155 pixels, file size: 359 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,738 × 1,155 pixels, file size: 359 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Battle of Lake Regillus was a legendary early Roman victory, won over either the Etruscans or the Latin League. ... 1880 illustration by JR Weguelin of Castor and Pollux fighting for the Romans at the Battle of Lake Regillus. ... Lays of Ancient Rome, 1881 edition ( ISBN 0898759366 ) The Lays of Ancient Rome is collection of ballads about heroic episodes in Roman history. ... Quotes His imagination resembled the wings of an ostrich. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Part of the Roman Forum. ... The Battle of Lake Regillus was a legendary early Roman victory, won over either the Etruscans or the Latin League. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Following tradition as old as Homer,[8] Pollux was accounted a powerful boxer, and Castor a great horseman. In Roman mythology, Castor was venerated much more often than Pollux, to the extent that the pair became known as the Castores. A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ...


For other examples of the mytheme of the Unequal Twins, compare Amphion and Zethus of Thebes and Romulus and Remus of Rome. Compare also the Alcis of Germanic Mythology with the Asvins of Vedic mythology, suggesting an Indo-European origin for the myth of the divine twins. In the study of mythology, a mytheme is an irreducible nugget of myth, an unchanging element, similar to a cultural meme, one that is always found shared with other, related mythemes and reassembled in various ways—bundled was Claude Lévi-Strausss image— or linked in more complicated relationships... Amphion (native of two lands) and Zethus, in ancient Greek mythology, were the twin sons of Zeus by Antiope. ... Thebes (Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva; Katharevousa: — Thêbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... In Hinduism, the Asvins are the twin sons of Saranya, who is a goddess of the dawn and wife of either Surya or Vivasvat. ... This article discusses the historical religious practices in the Vedic time period; see Dharmic religions for details of contemporary religious practices. ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus The existence of similarities among the deities and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples allows glimpses of a common Proto-Indo-European religion and mythology. ... The Divine twins are a mytheme of Proto-Indo-European mythology. ...


In astronomy

The constellation Gemini is said to represent these twins. Its brightest stars, Castor and Pollux (α and β Geminorum), are named for them. Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Castor (α Gem / α Geminorum / Alpha Geminorum) is the second brightest star in the constellation Gemini and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Pollux (β Gem / β Geminorum / Beta Geminorum) is one of the brightest star in the constellation Gemini and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ...


In Mountaineering

There are at least two sets of twin summits named after Castor and Pollux. In Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, USA, the peaks are found close to the headwaters of the Lamar River in the Absaroka Range. Another pair is located in the Pennine Alps at the Swiss-Italian border. Yellowstone redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... The Lamar River is a tributary of the Yellowstone River, approximately 30 mi (48 km) long, in northwestern Wyoming in the United States. ... The Absaroka Range is shown highlighted on a map of North America The Absaroka Range is a mountain range, a sub-range on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains stretching for about 150 mi (240 km) across the Montana-Wyoming border, and forming the eastern boundary of Yellowstone National... Pollux (4,092 m) is a mountain in the Pennine Alps on the border between Valais, Switzerland and the Aosta Valley in Italy. ... The Pennine Alps (also: Valais Alps) are a mountain range in the western part of the Alps. ...


In Religion

Acts 28:11- And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose sign (figurehead) was Castor and Pollux (the Twin Brothers of Zeus).


In art

Various classical sculptural groups of 2 nude males have been identified as Castor and Pollux - sometimes securely (eg the Castor and Pollux at the Prado Museum), sometimes less so (eg The Horse Tamers) . The San Ildefonso Group The Castor and Pollux group (also known as the San Ildefonso Group, after San Ildefonso, the location of the palace of La Granja at which it was kept until 1839) is a 1st century AD ancient Roman sculptural group, now in the Museo del Prado. ... The Museo del Prado is a world class museum and art gallery located in Madrid, Spain. ... A mid-18th century etching of the Palazzo del Quirinale by Giovanni Battista Piranesi: the colossal Horse Tamers are shadowed in the foreground, but the obelisk from the Mausoleum of Augustus (erected 1783 - 1786) has not yet been set up between them. ...


Castor et Pollux was the title of a 1737 opera by Jean-Philippe Rameau (libretto by Bernard), modified in 1754. The latter version became quite popular. Castor et Pollux (Castor and Pollux) is an opera by Jean-Philippe Rameau, first performed on 24 October 1737 at the Académie royale de musique in Paris. ... Jean-Philippe Rameau, by Jacques André Joseph Aved, 1728 Jean-Philippe Rameau (French IPA: ) (September 25, 1683 - September 12, 1764) was one of the most important French composers and music theorists of the Baroque era. ...


In popular culture

Face/Off is a 1997 film starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage and directed by John Woo. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Alessandro Antine Nivola (born June 28, 1972) is an American actor, perhaps known for his roles in the films Best Laid Plans, Jurassic Park III, Face/Off, and the Goal! trilogy. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... For other uses, see Psychosis (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Thomas Macaulay The Right Honourable Thomas Babington (or Babbington) Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay, PC (October 25, 1800 - December 28, 1859) was a nineteenth century British poet, historian and Whig politician. ... Lays of Ancient Rome, 1881 edition ( ISBN 0898759366 ) The Lays of Ancient Rome is collection of ballads about heroic episodes in Roman history. ... The Battle of Lake Regillus was a legendary early Roman victory, won over either the Etruscans or the Latin League. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Scholiast on Lycophron, noted by Karl Kerenyi, 1959. The Heroes of the Greeks p.107 note 584.
  2. ^ The familiar theme in Greek mythology of the mixed seed of a mortal and an immortal father is played out in various ways: compare Theseus.
  3. ^ Burkert 1985; Kerenyi 1959:107)
  4. ^ Kerenyi 1959 draws attention espercially to the rock carvings in the town of Akrai, Sicily (1959:111).
  5. ^ Burkert 1985:212, who notes F. Chapouthier, Les Dioscures au service d'une déesse, 1935.
  6. ^ The reader will immediately recognize in Phoebe ("the pure") an epithet of the moon, Selene; her twin's name Hilaeira ("the serene") is also a lunar attribute, their names "appropriate selectively to the new and the full moon" (Kerenyi 1959:109).
  7. ^ In the oration of the Athenian peace emissary sent to Sparta in 371, according to Xenophon (Hellenica VI), it was asserted that "these three heroes were the first strangers upon whom this gift was bestowed." (Karl Kerenyi, 1967. Eleusis: Archetypal Image of Mother and Daughter (Princeton: Bollingen), p. 122.
  8. ^ "Castor, the breaker of horses, and Polydeuces the hardy boxer" (Odyssey XI.300

Scholium (tr~bXtoe), the name given to a grammatical, critical and explanatory note, extracted from existing commentaries and inserted on the margin of the manuscript of an ancient author. ... Lycophron was a Greek poet and grammarian. ... One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... // Phoebe or Phebe may refer to: Phoebe (mythology), one of the original Titans One of the Heliades Phoebe, the daughter of Leucippus Another name for Artemis Helens sister, daughter of Leda As for Melissa, a person of rare beauty Phebe, a shepherdess in Shakespeares As You Like It... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , ca. ... One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ...

External links

is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Castor and Pollux
  • Ringleben, Joachim, "An Interpretation of the 10th Nemean Ode", Ars Disputandi. Translated by Douglas Hedley and Russell Manning. Pindar's themes of the unequal brothers and faithfulness and salvation, with the Christian parallels in the dual nature of Christ.
  • Burkert, Walter, 1985. Greek Religion (Cambridge: Harvard University Press), pp 212-13
  • Kerenyi, Karl, 1959. The Heroes of the Greeks (Thames and Hundson), pp 105-112 et passim
  • Pindar, Tenth Nemean Ode

  Results from FactBites:
 
Castor and Pollux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (650 words)
In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Pollux (sometimes called Polydeuces) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra.
The Dioscuri on the reverse of this coin by the Roman Emperor Maxentius.
Castor and Polydeuces abducted and married Phoebe and Hilaeira, the daughters of Leucippus.
Castor and Pollux (384 words)
Castor and Pollux were the offspring of Leda and the swan, under which disguise Jupiter had concealed himself.
From this incident, Castor and Pollux came afterwards to be considered the patron deities of seamen and voyagers, and the lambent flames, which in certain states of the atmosphere play round the sails and masts of vessels, were called by their names.
Castor was slain, and Pollux, inconsolable for the loss of his brother, besought Jupiter to be permitted to give his own life as ransom for him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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