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Encyclopedia > Castlevania

Castlevania is a video game series, created and developed by Konami. The series debuted in Japan on September 26, 1986 with the release of Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ Akumajō Dorakyura?, lit. "Demon Castle Dracula") for the Famicom Disk System (FDS), followed by an alternate version for the MSX 2 platform on October 30. Although the MSX 2 port (localized in Europe and Brazil as Vampire Killer) was released first outside of Japan, the series did not receive wide attention outside of Japan until the FDS version was ported to cartridge format for the Nintendo Entertainment System and localized for North American and European releases of Castlevania in 1987. The series soon became a recognized landmark in the design of action platforming games and reowned for aesthetic in its elaborate art direction and design and theatrical music soundtracks. While the earliest games seized their source material from motifs in iconic horror cinema, the series later developed a much more artistic and dramatic direction drawn from Gothic fiction and dark Romanticism. Castlevania is a video game series, created and developed by Konami. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... This is a list of video game franchises organised alphabetically by name. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Vampire Killer (1986) is a game for the MSX2 home computer, produced by Konami and released in Japan, Europe and Brazil. ... In computer science, porting is the process of adapting software so that an executable program can be created for a computing environment that is different from the one for which it was originally designed (e. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Software localization is a process of translating software user interfaces from one language to another and adapting it to suit a foreign culture. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A gallery of classic Universal monsters Universal Horror is the name given to the distinctive series of horror films made by Universal Studios in California from the 1920s through to the 1950s. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ... Dark romanticism, also referred to as anti-transcendentalism is a label applied to some gothic fiction. ...


The Castlevania series is one of Konami's most famous franchises, and has seen titles released for the Nintendo Entertainment System, the Super Nintendo, the Sega Mega Drive, the PC Engine, the PlayStation, the Sega Saturn, the Nintendo 64, the PlayStation 2 and the Microsoft Xbox video game consoles. Several franchise titles have been released for handheld game consoles, including the Game Boy, the Game Boy Advance, Playstation Portable and the Nintendo DS, and for various personal computer platforms, including the MSX 2, the Commodore 64, the Sharp X68000, the Commodore Amiga, PC MS-DOS, and Microsoft Windows. “NES” redirects here. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... The PC Engine was a video game console released by NEC, a Japanese company, in 1987. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... PS2 redirects here. ... Xbox and a Controller S The Xbox is Microsofts game console, released on November 15, 2001. ... Game console redirects here. ... A handheld game console is a lightweight, portable electronic machine for playing video games. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... NDS redirects here. ... Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... C-64 redirects here. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ... Amiga is the name of a range of home/personal computers using the Motorola 68000 processor family, whose development started in 1982. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Windows redirects here. ...

Contents

Overview

The Castlevania series is about a war between the enchanted family of the Belmonts (originally "Belmondo") and Dracula. Almost every hundred years, Dracula is resurrected and it is up to the Belmonts to defeat him before he unleashes his wrath on the entire world. Listed below are characters from all of the Castlevania video game series. ... Dracula ) is a fictional vampire from the multi-platform Castlevania video game series. ...


The series is loosely based on Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. In fact, the novel is included in the official timeline of the series, with Castlevania: Bloodlines taking place shortly afterwards.[1] The connection even goes as far as to claim that Quincy Morris, a character from the novel, is in fact a Belmont descendant. Morris is also said to have a son, John, and a grandson, Jonathan, who star in Bloodlines and Portrait of Ruin, respectively. The series also incorporates a variety of other creatures from classic horror fiction, films, fantasy, and mythology. These monsters serve to obstruct the path to Dracula but are rarely tied to the game's plot. Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... This article is about the novel. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ...


Recurring major characters

Dracula

Dracula has generally been the main antagonist throughout the Castlevania series, though the portrayal of the character has varied over time. He was originally depicted as little more than a villain, but the character became much more dramatic as more titles were released. Dramatic or not, Dracula always played an important role in the series; his legacy stays even in the games where he doesn't make any canonical physical appearances, such as in Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow. In games where Dracula does actually make a "physical" appearance, he often sports royal clothing with a cape. During the early games, his clothing is mostly red or purple, but in more recent releases, he has been dressed mostly in black with black/red cape. Dracula ) is a fictional vampire from the multi-platform Castlevania video game series. ... Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow is a game that is a part of the Castlevania video game series. ...


The Belmont Family

The Belmont bloodline is sworn to oppose Dracula in all his various forms. In most Castlevania games, the main character is a Belmont. If not, the Belmonts are usually present in the form of supporting characters. Following continuity of the book, twice the hero has been from the Morris family. In Castlevania: Bloodlines for the Sega Genesis, the player could choose between two characters, one of which was John Morris (the son of Quincey Morris from the novel Dracula, which the Bloodlines manual tells us). In Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin, the player could take control of Jonathan Morris, the elder John Morris' son. Listed below are characters from all of the Castlevania video game series. ...


Enemies

Throughout the series, Dracula's castle and other locations have been filled with monsters and servants that seek to thwart the heroes' quests. These have ranges from creatures of legend and mythology such as Harpies and the Catoblepas, and classical and literary monsters such as the Werewolf and Frankenstein's Monster, to giant animals, demonic maids, and possessed furniture. Among these, some enemy types have been found in nearly all incarnations of the series, and are considered staples. Harpy (from Latin: Harpyia, Greek: Άρπυια, Harpuia, pl. ... The catoblepas (from the Greek καταβλέπω, to look downwards) is a legendary creature from Ethiopia, described first by Pliny the Elder and later by Claudius Aelianus. ... For other uses, see Werewolf (disambiguation). ... Frankensteins monster (or Frankenstein or Frankensteins creature) is a fictional character that first appeared in Mary Shelleys novel, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ...


The Undead


In keeping with its gothic/horror theme, Castlevania includes many undead enemies, such as zombies, skeletons, and ghosts. Two of the most common found are zombies that rise from the floor and move towards the hero, and skeletons that throw bones in a high arc. Skeletons equipped with armor and various weapons such as spears, swords, and boomerangs are also common. These seem to be made from the corpses of previous victims, as Aria of Sorrow contained many zombie soldiers who presumably died during the battle in 1999. Undead is a collective name for mythological beings that are deceased yet behave as if alive. ... This article is about the undead. ... For other uses, see Skeleton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ...


Death


The Grim Reaper, later better known simply as Death, is present in nearly all Castlevania games. Death is often an end-game boss, that is, he appears late in the game, shortly before the final boss (though he is once honored to be the final boss, in Castlevania: Lament of Innocence). In some of the later games, he is also known as Dracula's second in command, and occasionally plays an important role, such as where he teams up with Dracula's first form in Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin. For the most recent games, Death's statistics have been revolved around the number 4. In Aria and Dawn of Sorrow and as well as Portrait of Ruin, his HP is 4444. This is because one of the readings for the number 4 in Japanese is 'shi', which has the same pronunciation as the word for 'death'. Grim Reaper redirects here. ... Castlevania: Lament of Innocence is a PlayStation 2 video game in the Castlevania series. ...


Appearance-wise, Death always looks like a floating skeleton, often without a lower body. His fashion evolves slightly; in early games, he just wears a ragged cloak, and looks precisely like how the cultural Grim Reaper looks like. Later, he starts wearing fancy top hats, multi-layered coats, and sometimes has been shown wearing some degree of armor. Duke Ellington wearing a top hat. ...


Like his master Dracula, Death always uses the same basic attacks in every game. In one attack he possesses, he tries to hit the heroes with a scythe. Another is that he almost always summons small sickles out of thin air that home in onto the heroes, and this particular attack is usually the main stress factor of the fight, especially in early games where the heroes can't move as freely as later characters. Like Dracula, he has been fighting the heroes in two forms lately: Often the first form with him donning his normal clothings and the second form where he becomes various skeletal creatures. A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ... Using a sickle A sickle is a curved, hand-held agricultural tool typically used for harvesting grain crops before the advent of modern harvesting machinery. ...


Bats


A fictional work revolving around Dracula is not complete without bats. This enemy has been present in almost every Castlevania game (The exception being Castlevania: Curse of Darkness), usually as a weak enemy that flies around in a pattern that makes them hard to hit, and in the process, making it hard for the heroes to get through, especially when the heroes are traversing perilous terrains such as collapsing bridges. These bats have become less and less intimidating as the series progress since now they rarely appear in crucial times (see Medusa Head and Fleamen below for comparison). In the original Castlevania, both red and blue versions existed, the latter of which would wait hanging upside down for the player to get closer before striking. Consistent with this, a group of red and blue bats would make a cameo (along with a lone skeleton) on the third episode of the animated series Captain N: The Game Master, in which Kevin was fighting his way through the world of Castlevania. This article is about mammals. ... Captain N: The Game Master is a cartoon series that aired on U.S. and United Kingdom television from 1989 to 1992. ...


In contrast, some other bats have become bosses in the series. The first of such bat boss is a Giant Bat (also called Phantom Bat) which is actually the first boss to be introduced to non-arcade Castlevania games. These recurring boss have been seen in different forms, and even inspire some other bosses in later games to mimic their battle style.


Medusa / Medusa Heads


When Medusa first appeared in the first Castlevania title, and even earlier (or later) in Castlevania: Lament of Innocence, she was but a head. However, this so called Medusa Head later becomes one of the most well-known and much hated enemy in the whole Castlevania series, not only for being present in practically every Castlevania game, but also one of the most frustrating enemies in the whole series for often appearing in the worst places at the worst times, usually in the Clock Tower area of the castle, where there are moving gear platforms near a wall or bed of spikes for the player to be knocked into, leading to a large amount of health being lost. To add more frustration, Medusa Heads in later games also have the power to petrify, even though Medusa bosses already have this petrification ability from quite early. These enemies were so hated that GameSpot claimed that they were one of the things in games that gamers love to hate.[2] Medusa, by Arnold Böcklin (1878) In Greek mythology, Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα, guardian, protectress[1]) was a monstrous chthonic female character, essentially an extension of an apotropaic mask, gazing upon whom could turn onlookers to stone. ... Castlevania: Lament of Innocence is a PlayStation 2 video game in the Castlevania series. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ...


Armored Knights / Living Armors


Castlevania houses a large variety of armored knights and living armors, though whether these armors are actually worn is not certain. In early days, there are lance-wielding knights and axe-wielding knights, which is particularly interesting because they can throw their axes like a boomerang. Later, more and more armored knights are added, ranging from a normal sword wielding knight, bomb-throwers, disc users (who throw bladed discs attached to a cord like a yo-yo) and more, even their sizes start to vary greatly, with some knights being human-sized while others are as tall as the room they're in (which are usually large). A variant of this (known as the Black Knight) would appear on the third episode of the cartoon, Captain N, in which Kevin was fighting his way through the world of Castlevania. It appeared very large and threw a seemingly unlimited supply of lances at Kevin, and was at least one story tall. As with many video game characters portrayed on this cartoon, this was inconsistent with their appearances in the games and their respective concept art. As the Black Knights appeared in Castlevania I and II (the only 2 games released in the U.S. during the time of the episode) they did not throw their lances, and were the same general height as the games' protagonist, Simon Belmont. However, this representation would appear more accurate in comparison to later games. This article is about the wooden implement. ... The yo-yo is a toy consisting of two equally-sized discs of plastic, wood, or metal, connected with an axle, around which a string is wound. ...


Hunchbacks / Fleamen


These little enemies are almost the same as Medusa Heads, in that their mobility is their main threat. Early in the series, these enemies were pretty slow, but because they loved jumping around erratically, they became a menace. This problem no longer exist in the latter games, mostly because by then, they are too weak to actually inflict considerable damage. Also, they are not considered as deadly as Medusa Heads because unlike the heads, the Hunchbacks / Fleamen are rarely present in critical areas of the castle, whereas Medusa Heads often pop up in places with a lot of instant/quick-kill threats.


Fish Men / Mermen


The fish-humanoids are present from the very first Castlevania, and have never been away from watery places. They usually attack by spitting, though curiously enough they don't always spit water (or maybe acid solution instead of water), that is, sometimes they are even able to spit fire. A Fish Man would make an appearance, looking rather frog-like, on the third episode of the cartoon, Captain N, in which Kevin was fighting his way through the world of Castlevania.


Legion


In most cases of the series, Legion serves as a main boss. Legion was called Granfaloon in the E.U and U.S versions of Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Legion is a sort of living orb that flies around attacking with zapping tentacles. Its most noticeable feature, however, is its armor constructed entirely of dead bodies. To get to the orbical weak spot, the player will have to attack its "corpse armor" until its true form is revealed. In one instance where Legion is different from this description is in Castlevania: Circle Of The Moon, where Legion is a lesser monster composed of three heads melted together, and with tentacles coming out of the three mouths. Touching Legion in Circle Of The Moon results in being cursed. In Dawn of Sorrow the room where the final battle is held is made out of Legion-like corpses. It most likely takes its name from the biblical story of the demon Legion where a young man is possessed by numerous demons. (Mark 5:9 ...And He [Jesus] asked him, What is thy name? And he [the demons] answered, saying, My name is Legion: for we are many...). In Curse of Darkness, after defeating Legion, the core will transform into a humanoid figure, hunched over with long arms. It could stretch, shoot beams, and teleport through the room made from corpses and bones. In the Castelvania: Aria of Sorrow, legion appears as a ball of floating bodies. Every other successful hit the player made on legion would cause a body to fall off and walk back and forth, often clogging the narrow platforms that the player had to stand on in order to hit Legion. Jesus healing the man from Gerasa. ...


Recurring castle areas

More often than not, Castlevania games take place in Dracula's castle (very often called Castlevania itself). While the castle areas change from time to time[3], some places seem to stay the same.


Castle Entrance


This section of the castle, as the name suggests, is normally featured early in a Castlevania game. Originally serving as the first level of Vampire Killer and Castlevania, this portion of Dracula's castle is notable for the following characteristics:

  • It normally begins outside in a brief forest section, where the character must enter the actual castle via drawbridge or just a regular entrance.
  • Inside, the player must reach the main hallway. Often this location has gray walls that are partially crumbled, exposing brick work along with pillars, curtains and tall window sets. The common enemies here are zombies, bats, and sometimes panthers.
  • Midway through the level, there is usually a flooded basement section featuring mermen.
  • After exiting the basement section, there is usually one final hallway similar to the first main hallway.
  • The song entitled "Vampire Killer" is often heard for the background music in homage to that tune being heard in this level of the original games.

Chapel Vampire Killer is the name of a traditional tune heard in the Castlevania series. ...


The supposed place of worship is another of Castlevania's favorite places. One particular characteristic of a Castlevania chapel is that it is always the only place in the castle which is decorated with stained glass windows. Sometimes, stained-glass humanoid forms will appear from these windows to attack the player. Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ...


Clock Tower


In early games, this portion of the castle is often featured towards the end of the game, serving as either the final stage which leads directly to Dracula's Keep, or the game's second to last stage, an honor which is often lost in latter games even though this place is always located close to the keep. The tower contains spinning gears and pendulums which serve as platforms and enemies that usually consist of Medusa heads and harpies. The Clock Tower is also the one place in the castle with a lot of instant-kill threats, mostly spikes.


Castle Keep


The keep is Dracula's personal room, so to speak, and because of that, this place has usually been featured in most Castlevania games. This place is distinct in several ways: For other uses, see Keep (disambiguation). ...

  • It is always the highest spot of the castle (though usually matched by the Clock Tower).
  • The keep is always connected to the rest of the castle by merely a single long flight of stairs with either a waxing crescent or full moon shown in the background, along with (sometimes) the clock tower.
  • In most later games, this keep also serves as a throne room.

Underground Caverns


Literally the wettest place in Castlevania. Inhabitants of this place are usually the mermen, killer fish and other aquatic beasts, though some other enemies also make their home here, such as fractile golems. In some later games, waterfalls are often seen here. In at least one instance, the water itself is poison. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A golem (sometimes pronounced goilem), in medieval folklore and from Jewish mythology is an animated being crafted from inanimate material. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Dungeon


The dungeon stages usually feature backgrounds filled with prison cells (sometimes occupied), chains and wall handcuffs, and skeletons and corpses laying just about everywhere. The stages usually feature such enemies as bone throwing skeletons, hunchbacks, and axe wielding knights. The stage's final stretch usually features a long hallway with these aforementioned knights and then a boss fight.


Games

See also: List of Castlevania titles

Castlevania is a video game series, created and developed by Konami. ...

Chronology

Prior to the release of Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance, every game in the series was accepted as canon, with the original versions of certain games (such as the original Castlevania and Dracula X) usually accepted as the canonical interpretation of certain events. This was assumed even though there was no official unified direction to the series's storyline (other than conflicts against Dracula). However, when Koji Igarashi took over as producer for the series, he revised the timeline and removed Castlevania Legends, the Nintendo 64 Castlevania, Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness and Castlevania: Circle of the Moon from it. According to an interview later conducted with 1UP.com, the only game he deliberately retconned was Castlevania Legends, whereas the other games were produced to be side-stories from the start.[4] Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ... Koji Igarashi ), also known simply by the nickname IGA, is a Konami employee and the current producer of the Castlevania video game series. ... ...


With the release of Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin, Konami of America has included a pre-order bonus "20th Anniversary" package that includes a Castlevania series timeline. This timeline includes the dates for the Nintendo 64 Castlevania, Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness and Castlevania: Circle of the Moon, but does not include the date for Castlevania Legends.[5]. It is speculated, that this was likely to show all of the games for the series that had been released in North America (as the three games mentioned above are merely given titles and dates, with no story information given). However this hypothesis doesn't explain the lack of Castlevania Legends and its date on the timeline, although the game appears in the accompanying box artwork book.


Availability

Several games in the series have been produced in very limited quantities, in North America and Europe at least, and have thus greatly fallen short of demand. Most recently, Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance and Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow have been sold on eBay for two to three times their original selling price, prompting the release of an officially released "double pack" of both games in early 2006.[citation needed] Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance is a video game created by Konami for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance system. ... Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow is a game that is a part of the Castlevania video game series. ... This article is about the online auction center. ...


Akumajō Dracula X Chi no Rondo, considered by many Castlevania fans to be the "Holy Grail" of the series due to having been released solely on the Japanese PC Engine CD console, still sells for well over one hundred dollars on various internet auction sites, as does the original Japanese version of the MSX installment, Vampire Killer. An enhanced remake of Rondo of Blood was released for the PlayStation Portable under the name of Castlevania: Dracula X Chronicles. Other rare editions include the original Sharp X68000 remake of the first title in the series, which was later re-released on the original PlayStation under the moniker Castlevania Chronicles. Akumajō Dracula X Chi no Rondo , lit. ... The PC Engine was a video game console released by NEC, a Japanese company, in 1987. ... The PlayStation Portable , officially abbreviated as PSP) is a handheld game console released and currently manufactured by Sony Computer Entertainment. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ...


Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow has been found to be in short supply, and therefore, has been put back into production as of Fall 2006. Furthermore, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, one of the most popular games in the series, has become a rare find. In particular, there is a version that was released on Sega Saturn (with areas and playable characters not in the Playstation original), which is considered yet another lost treasure in the series. This version never received Western releases. It is also available on the Xbox 360, Xbox LIVE Marketplace for 800 Microsoft Points. The NES version of the original Castlevania, Castlevania II: Simon's Quest and Super Castlevania IV on the SNES have both been released on the Nintendo Wii's Virtual Console service.[6] Symphony of the Night was released on the Xbox 360's Xbox Live Arcade service March 21, 2007 and on the PlayStation Network on July 19, 2007. Symphony of the Night will also be unlockable in the upcoming Castlevania: Dracula X Chronicles, as well as the original version of Rondo of Blood. Castlevania: Symphony of the Night (SOTN) is a Japanese action-adventure game developed by Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo and published by Konami for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... Castlevania , lit. ... Super Castlevania IV ) was the first Castlevania game released on the Super NES console and is avaible on Wiis virtual console, announced to be released in November 2006. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is an online service operated by Microsoft that is used to distribute video games to Xbox and Xbox 360 owners and from late 2007 to Games for Windows - Live users [1]. The service was first launched in late 2004 and offers games from about US$5...


Development

Evolution of the games

The gameplay mechanics are fairly consistent among most of the earlier titles. The very first console title was a typical platform game in which the player takes the role of Simon Belmont, a descendant of the Belmont clan, a bloodline of whip wielding vampire hunters as he ventures inside Castlevania, the demonic castle of Lord Dracula and fights a variety of supernatural beasts through the castle up to its master's keep to destroy him. The whip used by the Belmont family is a holy relic passed down generation to generation named the Vampire Killer, which was blessed with the power to destroy vampires and other creatures of the night. The games also feature secondary weapons that are powered by hearts, all of which can be found by destroying candles. Common secondary weapons are the straight-flying dagger, the overhead-thrown axe, the ground-burning vial of holy water, a Bible that flies in a circular motion around the screen, the cross, which is wielded like a boomerang, and a stopwatch with the power of very briefly freezing time. Its first sequel, Castlevania II: Simon's Quest, featured several RPG-influenced elements, including a retractable world map the player was free to explore and revisit, purchase supplies, equipment and weapon upgrades in several different towns, and a leveling up system by gaining experience by vanquishing foes. The third console game returned to the traditional style and gameplay of its original predecessor while updating it with new features such as alternate paths with new and different stages and multiple playable characters, introducing allies to fight alongside with the Belmonts together against Dracula and his legions of demons and monsters. Castlevania , lit. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... Simon Belmont ) is a fictional protagonist in the Castlevania series of video games published by Konami. ... Listed below are characters from all of the Castlevania video game series. ... A vampire hunter or vampire slayer is someone who specializes in finding and destroying vampires and sometimes other creatures of dark fantasy as well. ... Dracula ) is a fictional vampire from the multi-platform Castlevania video game series. ... Vampire Killer (1986) is a game for the MSX2 home computer, produced by Konami and released in Japan, Europe and Brazil. ... Bold text This article is about the weapon. ... Axe For other uses, see Axe (disambiguation). ... This article is about water that has been blessed. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Also known as the Latin cross or crux ordinaria. ... This article is about the wooden implement. ... A stopwatch is a timepiece designed to measure the amount of time elapsed from a particular time when activated to when the piece is deactivated. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The major turning point in the gameplay mechanics, physics, and overall aesthetic of the series was Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Symphony was the progenitor of what is sometimes called a Metroidvania (also called: Castleroid) style of game due to its many similarities to the Metroid series (primarily Super Metroid), and combines this with the console RPG concepts of experience levels, hit points and magic points, usable items and collectible new powers and abilities, weapons, armor and other equipment. Most subsequent Castlevania games have since followed this new style, with the replacement of the secondary weapons by complex magic systems in which spell components are obtained from enemies or found in the castle. These systems use hearts to replenish MP and often include most of the classic secondary weapons among the much larger variety of spells and attacks. Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... Castlevania: Symphony of the Night (SOTN) is a Japanese action-adventure game developed by Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo and published by Konami for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... Box art of the first Metroid game The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Experience points (often abbreviated as exp or xp) are a representation of a characters advancement and improvement in skills in role-playing games. ... In many wargames, role-playing games, and combat-oriented video games, hit points are an abstraction for the amount of damage an object or player in the game can take before becoming ineffective. ... Magic points (MP), mind power, or mana, are units of magical power that are used in many role-playing games (RPGs). ...


In addition to reinventing the technical aspects of Castlevania, Symphony adopted an entirely new image and art direction for the world in which the games took place and the characters that existed within it. The early installments portrayed something of a sword and sorcery or dark fantasy thematic interspersed with a rugged, leather armor bound look for the Belmont bloodline. With the advent of illustrator and concept artist Ayami Kojima onto the development team beginning with Symphony, the design underwent a total transformation into an elegant, hauntingly beautiful appearance inspired by the European Mannerist and Baroque art periods befitting of its romantic Gothic horror theme. As such the characters' dress and condition evolved into ornate and grand ensembles including flowing jackets, vests and period attire and the imagery and landscape of the castle and surrounding locales became lush and lavish. The two Nintendo DS Castlevania games' art style reverted back to a simpler anime style similar to that of the original Dracula X: Rondo of Blood in hopes of broadening the player demographic by not discouraging slightly younger Nintendo DS owners to be put off by the maturer image of Kojima's art. [7] Dawn of Sorrow was the first game to receive this makeover, and the second DS release Portrait of Ruin followed suit. [8] Kojima returned for the PSP remake of Rondo of Blood, Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles. This article is about a fantasy sub-genre. ... Dark fantasy is a subgenre that combines elements of fantasy, including marvelous abilities, with those of horror. ... Ayami Kojima (小島 文美 Kojima Ayami) is a Japanese illustrator and concept artist that is most well known for her work on the Castlevania series of video games with Konami. ... Mannerism is the usual English term for an approach to all the arts, particularly painting but not exclusive to it, a reaction to the High Renaissance, emerging after the Sack of Rome in 1527 shook Renaissance confidence, humanism and rationality to their foundations, and even Religion had split apart. ... Baroque art is the painting and sculpture associated with the Baroque cultural movement, a movement often identified with Absolutism and the Counter Reformation; the existence of important Baroque art and architecture in non-absolutist and Protestant states, however, undercuts this linking. ... Romantics redirects here. ... The gothic novel is an English literary genre, which can be said to have been born with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... Look up period in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... NDS redirects here. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Akumajō Dracula X Chi no Rondo , lit. ... NDS redirects here. ...


The first games in the series to employ 3D graphics were released to mixed reactions in critical and public venues. These include the Nintendo 64 Castlevania and Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness for the Nintendo 64. In Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, as well as in the two DS titles, backgrounds were occasionally three-dimensional. This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... Castlevania , lit. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ...


IGA has recently stated that if The Dracula X Chronicles does well, the series may return to the a more traditional style of the original games, possibly suggesting further remakes for the Chronicles titles.[citation needed]


Regional variations and localization

In Japan, the series is most commonly known as Akumajō Dracula ("Demon Castle Dracula"). However, not every installment of the franchise has borne that title. For example, the first two installments for the Nintendo Game Boy were released under the title Dracula Densetsu ("Dracula Legend") and the game known in North America as Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse was originally released in Japan as Akumajō Densetsu. Castlevania: Bloodlines was also released as Vampire Killer in Japan. Starting with the release of Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance for the Game Boy Advance, the Japanese games adopted the "Castlevania" name for a brief period. According to series producer Koji Igarashi (or IGA, as he is commonly known), the developers chose to adopt the Castlevania moniker as a way to involve scenarios that do not solely revolve around Dracula himself.[citation needed] Later bowing to overwhelming fan demand, Konami returned to the "Akumajō Dracula" branding for the Japanese release of Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow. Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance is a video game created by Konami for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance system. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... Koji Igarashi ), also known simply by the nickname IGA, is a Konami employee and the current producer of the Castlevania video game series. ...


The series is also known for the differences between the Japanese and English language versions. Particularly in earlier installments, the localization process usually removes a heavy share of violence, nudity and religious imagery and references. Removal of such material is prevalent in Nintendo and Super Nintendo titles Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse and Super Castlevania IV due to Nintendo of America's strict censorship policies at the time. Castlevania: Bloodlines, for the Sega Genesis, was renamed Castlevania: The New Generation for European release to avoid the blood reference used in the American title. In addition, blood and gore was re-colored throughout the European game.[citation needed] Although censorship policies vary from country to country in Europe, some countries, including Germany's strict "decency standards," may inevitably affect the content released throughout the entire continent. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Software localization is a process of translating software user interfaces from one language to another and adapting it to suit a foreign culture. ... Super Castlevania IV ) was the first Castlevania game released on the Super NES console and is avaible on Wiis virtual console, announced to be released in November 2006. ...


In addition, the English localizations have been plagued by a number of inconsistencies from their original Japanese counterparts. Two prevalent alterations to the "Belmont" surname are "Belmondo" or "Belmond" in the Japanese games. In the Xbox version of Castlevania: Curse of Darkness, Hector clearly says "Belmont," yet the subtitles incorrectly reads "Belmondo." The name of the protagonist of Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse was changed from "Ralph C. Belmondo" to "Trevor Belmont" for the English version. A notable mistake is the misspelling of the character name "Soleiyu Belmont" from Castlevania II: Belmont's Revenge. It is a mistransliteration of "Soleil," French for "sun." Trevor C. Belmont , Ralph C. Belmond) is a fictional vampire hunter that lived during the 15th century in the video game series, Castlevania by Konami. ...


Merchandise and other media

  • Simon Belmont was one of the stars in the animated series Captain N: The Game Master.[9] He was a member of the N-Team, a group of mostly video game characters who defended Videoland against the evils of Mother Brain from Metroid and others. He does not appear in the Captain N Valiant Comics series. Dracula (referred to only as "The Count" in the series) was also one of the villains in Captain N. Alucard also appeared in one episode, though he was portrayed as a rebellious skateboarding teenager. Several other Castlevania monsters appeared in cameo roles, including Frankenstein, the Mummy, the Wolf Man, and the Skull Knight. Simon is portrayed as egotistical and somewhat effeminate on the show.
  • In 2005 IDW Publishing released a comic book adaptation Castlevania: The Belmont Legacy written by Marc Andreyko with art by E. J. Su. [11]
  • On October 13 2006 comic book writer Warren Ellis announced on his blog that he is on board to pen an animated film adaptation of Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse for Project 51 Productions. James Jean will be the art director.[12]
  • The final chapter of the eighth volume in the manga Hellsing is titled "Castlevania".
  • In the video game version of the movie Van Helsing, one of the rooms is a library. One of the sections of books mentions a book about the Belmont family and their quests against Dracula.
  • A beatmania IIDX version of BLOODY TEARS is been featured in beatmania IIDX 13 DistorteD and Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA2.

Simon Belmont ) is a fictional protagonist in the Castlevania series of video games published by Konami. ... Captain N: The Game Master is a cartoon series that aired on U.S. and United Kingdom television from 1989 to 1992. ... Mother Brain can refer to the following things: Mother Brain, a character in the Metroid game series. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... For the Hal Foster comic strip, see Prince Valiant. ... Zarbon action figure from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ... The National Entertainment Collectibles Association or NECA is an American manufacturer of collectibles typically licensed from films, sports, music, and television based in New Jersey. ... Simon Belmont ) is a fictional protagonist in the Castlevania series of video games published by Konami. ... Dracula ) is a fictional vampire from the multi-platform Castlevania video game series. ... This article or section on a video game-related subject may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... Castlevania: Symphony of the Night (SOTN) is a Japanese action-adventure game developed by Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo and published by Konami for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... IDW Publishing (a division of Idea and Design Works) is an American comic book company. ... E.J. Su is an American comic book artist and penciller. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the comic book author. ... James Jean is an award winning illustrator living in Los Angeles. ... George Ouzounian, (b. ... The Alphabet of Manliness is a New York Times Bestseller humor book written by Internet satirist and self-proclaimed pirate George Ouzounian, who is better known by his pseudonym Maddox. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Serialized in Young King OURs Original run 1997 – ongoing Volumes 9 volumes, with 87 total chapters (current) Hellsing ) is a manga series by Kouta Hirano. ... Van Helsing is a third-person shooter for the Play Station 2 and Xbox which resembles the events of the 2004 action/horror film of the same name by Stephen Sommers. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ...

Film

In November 2005, Crystal Sky Pictures acquired the rights to adapt the video game series for the big screen. The company attached Paul W.S. Anderson(note: Paul W.S. Anderson has given up his role as director to work on other projects and has since been replaced) to write and direct the film adaptation, with production slated to begin in mid-2006.[13] Later in the month, Dimension Films entered negotiations with Crystal Sky for North American distribution of Castlevania. The film adaptation was estimated to have a budget of $50 million.[14] In July 2006, producer Jeremy Bolt explained that Castlevania will "integrate a Dracula origin story... with the story of the Belmonts." Bolt also said that the film would refer back to early versions of the games.[15] Director Anderson reiterated Bolt's description, adding that Dracula and Simon Belmont would be key characters in the film. Anderson also indicated that the "very lush, Romantic, Gothic look" of the 3D incarnations of the Castlevania series would be used in the film. He also expressed his hope in using the games' composer, Michiru Yamane, to score the film adaptation.[16] Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Al Jazeera bombing memo • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Black sites scandal • Conservative leadership race (UK) • Fuel prices • Irans nuclear program • Jilin chemical plant explosions • Kashmir earthquake • Malawi food crisis • Malaysian prisoner abuse scandal • New Delhi bombings investigation • Niger food crisis • North Indian cyclone... This is a list of video game franchises organised alphabetically by name. ... Paul William Scott Anderson (Born: March 4, 1965 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, United Kingdom-) is a British filmmaker, producer and screenwriter. ... Film adaptation is the transfer of a written work to a feature film. ... Dimension Films is a motion picture unit currently a part of The Weinstein Company. ... Michiru Yamane (Japanese: 山根 ミチル Yamane Michiru) composed video game music for Castlevania and other Konami games, including Suikoden. ...


In November 2006, Rogue Pictures replaced Dimension Films, who reneged over script differences, in handling North American distribution of Castlevania, with Crystal Sky Pictures handling international distribution. Paul W.S. Anderson described Castlevania to take place in many time periods, but primarily in 15th century Transylvania. The director and producer Jeremy Bolt had scouted locations in Hungary and Romania, with plans to build castle interiors in Budapest. Principal photography was slated to begin in spring 2007.[17] Rogue Pictures is a division of Focus Features, the specialty film division of Universal Studios, which is a division of NBC Universal. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ...


In January 2007, director Anderson said the studio was still finalizing the film's budget, and filming would begin in fall or winter in Transylvania and Hungary. According to the director, the filming was postponed because production had desired snow on the ground for the film's forest scenes. Anderson described the locations, "It was like discovering Mordor as a real location -- epic, dramatic, and above all scary. These locations haven't been shot properly in a mainstream movie, so that is always extra exciting...to put something on camera that hasn't been seen before." The director also revealed that post-production and effects work for Castlevania would be done in London.[18] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In June 2007, Anderson conceded directing duties to Sylvain White in order to take on the project Death Race, a remake of Death Race 2000. White, who played the Castlevania video game in the early 1990s, was attracted to the prospect of filming a vampire film. White explained, "Most of the vampire films have been present or set in the future, from Blade to Underworld, and I was attracted by the chance to make a dark, epic period movie that almost has an anime feel to it." The new director, who negotiated a salary of seven figures, will rewrite the script with Anderson's assistance. The premise will involve a Transylvanian knight and his men seeking refuge in a Gothic castle. They discover that the castle is controlled by the original vampire, Vlad the Impaler. The awakening of the vampire leads to a generational clash between Vlad and the Belmont clan, who seek to defeat him. Production of Castlevania is slated to begin in late fall 2007 in South Africa and Romania. Castlevania is planned for a late 2008 release.[19] In October 2007, Anderson said that he hoped to have a script within two or three weeks before the onset of the 2008 Hollywood strike. Producer Jeremy Bolt said that production was intended to begin in spring 2008.[20] The son of an American professional basketball player and a French flight attendant, Sylvain White was born in France and grew up mostly in Paris. ... Death Race is an upcoming American film written and directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. ... Death Race 2000 is a cult action film directed by Paul Bartel in 1975. ... Blade is a 1998 film starring Wesley Snipes and Stephen Dorff, loosely based on the published stories of the Marvel Comics character Blade. ... Underworld is a 2003 action-horror film about the secret history of vampire and werewolves, where the latter are referred to as Lycan as an abbreviated form of lycanthrope. ... Portrait of Vlad III Vlad III Dracula (Also known as Vlad Ţepeş /tsepesh/ in Romanian or Vlad the Impaler) born November/December, 1431 - died December 1476, and reigned as Prince of Wallachia 1448, 1456-1462 and 1476. ... Striking writers and supporters raise signs at a WGAW rally in Los Angeles Writer-actor Jeff Garlin of Curb Your Enthusiasm (foreground, right) and others at a WGAW rally outside the Fox Studios in Los Angeles The 2007 Writers Guild of America strike is a strike by both the Writers...


Reception

Almost of all of the Castlevania games have generally received positive reviews, with the notable exception of the N64 titles.


References

  1. ^ Castlevania Storyline. The Castlevania Dungeon. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  2. ^ GameSpot Staff (2007). Un-Valentine's Day: Game Stuff We Love to Hate. GameSpot.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  3. ^ Alucard: "This castle is a creature of chaos. It may take many incarnations." KCE Tokyo. Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Konami. PlayStation. 1997-10-2.
  4. ^ Kalata, Kurt (2006). Tales from the Crypt: Castlevania's 20th Anniversary Blow-Out. 1UP.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  5. ^ Castlevania: The Timeline (2006).
  6. ^ Wii Software. Nintendo.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  7. ^ Whip Smart: Konami's Koji Igarashi On Mastering Castlevania (2005).
  8. ^ Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin Updated Hands-On (2006).
  9. ^ Captain N - Television Series - Characters - Simon Belmont. Captain N Network. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  10. ^ Player Select Castlevania Series 1. [1] (2007). Retrieved on 11 July 2007.
  11. ^ Castlevania: The Belmont Legacy. The Castlevania Dungeon. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  12. ^ Ellis, Warren (2006). Castlevania. WarrenEllis.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  13. ^ Michael Speier. "Dracula ready for close-up", Variety, 2005-11-02. Retrieved on 2007-02-13. 
  14. ^ Michael Fleming; Ian Mohr. "Dimension does Dracula", Variety, 2005-11-07. Retrieved on 2007-02-13. 
  15. ^ Stax. "Castlevania, Death Race Buzz", IGN, 2006-06-28. Retrieved on 2007-02-13. 
  16. ^ Chris Carle. "Anderson Discusses Castlevania", IGN, 2006-06-29. Retrieved on 2007-02-13. 
  17. ^ Adam Dawtrey. "Rogue enters 'Castlevania'", Variety, 2006-11-02. Retrieved on 2007-02-13. 
  18. ^ "Castlevania Update", IGN, 2007-01-23. Retrieved on 2007-02-13. 
  19. ^ Michael Fleming. "White stakes out 'Castlevania'", Variety, 2007-06-13. Retrieved on 2007-06-14. 
  20. ^ Cindy White. "Castlevania Gears Up Pre-Strike", Sci Fi Wire, 2007-10-23. Retrieved on 2007-10-23. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Castlevania: Symphony of the Night (SOTN) is a Japanese action-adventure game developed by Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo and published by Konami for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SCI FI Wire is the news service of the The Sci Fi Channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Castlevania (video game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (807 words)
Castlevania is the North American and European title of Demon Castle Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ Akumajō Dracula), a Japanese console video game developed and published by Konami for the Famicom Disk System in 1986.
Castlevania is a typical platform game of the 8-bit era: the game is comprised of six levels, which are played through in a strictly linear progression.
Each of Castlevania's six levels conclude with a boss fight: these bosses are generally taken from horror literature or legend, and include Frankenstein's Monster, Medusa, and the Grim Reaper.
Castlevania characters - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1071 words)
1094 - Leon Belmont (Castlevania: Lament of Innocence)
1094 - Joachim Armster (Castlevania: Lament of Innocence)
1094 - Rinaldo Gandolfi (Castlevania: Lament of Innocence)
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