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Encyclopedia > Castaway
U.S. merchant seamen try to revive a shipwrecked Filipino fisherman rescued in the South China Sea.
Castaways may need to survive on a desert island.
Look up castaway in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

A castaway is a person who is cast adrift or ashore. While the situation usually happens after a shipwreck, some people voluntarily stay behind on a deserted island either to evade their captors or the world in general. Alternatively a person or item can be cast away, meaning rejected or discarded. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 749 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1972 × 1578 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 749 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1972 × 1578 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1700x1084, 898 KB)Helens Reef - a classic desert island - elevation above sea level about 8 feet. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1700x1084, 898 KB)Helens Reef - a classic desert island - elevation above sea level about 8 feet. ... A desert island in Palau. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Shipwreck of the SS American Star Shipwreck in the Saugatuck River mouth in Westport, Connecticut A shipwreck or sunken ship can refer to the remains of a wrecked ship or to the event that caused the wreck, such as the striking of something that causes the ship to sink, the... Kidnapping, a word derived from kid, meaning child and nap (nab) meaning snatch, recorded since 1673, was originally used as a term for the practice of stealing children for use as servants or laborers in the American colonies. ...


The provisions and resources available to castaways allow them to live on the island until other people arrive to take them off the island. However, such rescue missions may never happen if the person is not known to still be alive, the fact that they are missing is unknown or if the island is not mapped. These scenarios have given rise to the plots of numerous stories in the form of novels and film. A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ...

Contents

Real occurrences

Fernão Lopez

Main article: Fernão Lopez

The Portuguese Fernão Lopez was marooned on the island of Saint Helena in 1513. He had lost a hand and much of his face as a punishment for mutiny. With some interruptions he stayed on the island until his death in 1545. Fernão Lopez is reputed to have been the first permanent inhabitant of the remote island of Saint Helena in the Atlantic Ocean, an island that later became famous as the site of Napoleons exile and death. ... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ...


A Miskito called Will

Main article: Will (Indian)

In 1681, a Miskito named Will (he had been given that name by his English comrades) was sent ashore as part of an English foraging party to Más a Tierra. When he was hunting for goats in the interior of the island he suddenly saw his comrades departing in haste after having spotted the approach of enemies, leaving Will behind to survive until he was picked up in 1684. Will (probably born in the 1650s or 1660s) was an Indian of the Misquito tribe from what is now Honduras or Nicaragua. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... For the insect, see mosquito The Miskito are a Native American people in Central America. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Town San Juan Bautista, Robinson Crusoe, Cumberland Bay A fisherman with 2 Lobsters Robinson Crusoe Island, located in the Juan Fernández archipelago, which is situated in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean, 674 kilometres from the South American continent. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ...


Alexander Selkirk

Main article: Alexander Selkirk

The Juan Fernández Islands, to which Más a Tierra belongs, was to have a more famous occupant from October 1703 when Alexander Selkirk made the decision to stay there. (Selkirk had been born in Lower Largo in Scotland in 1680). Selkirk was concerned about the condition of the Cinque Ports, on which he was sailing, and remained on the island – the ship later sunk with most of its crew being lost. Being a voluntary castaway, Selkirk was able to gather numerous provisions to help him to survive, including a musket, gunpowder, carpenter's tools, a knife, a Bible, and his clothing. He survived on the island for four years and four months, building huts and hunting the plentiful wildlife before his rescue on 2 February 1709. His adventures were a direct inspiration for Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. In 1966 Más a Tierra was renamed Robinson Crusoe Island. Alexander Selkirk, born Alexander Selcraig, (1676–13 December 1721) was a Scottish sailor who spent four years as a castaway on an uninhabited island; it is probable that his travails provided the inspiration for Defoes Robinson Crusoe. ... The town of San Juan Bautista in Cumberland Bay, Robinson Crusoe Island Map of Isla Más Afuera / Selkirk Map of Isla Más a Tierra / Crusoe Orthographic projection centred over Juan Fernandez The Juan Fernández Islands is a sparsely inhabited island group in the South Pacific Ocean, situated... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... Alexander Selkirk, born Alexander Selcraig, (1676–13 December 1721) was a Scottish sailor who spent four years as a castaway on an uninhabited island; it is probable that his travails provided the inspiration for Defoes Robinson Crusoe. ... Lower Largo, Fife, Scotland Lower Largo is a village in Fife, Scotland situated on Largo Bay on the north side of the Firth of Forth. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Cinque Ports is the name of an English Government galleon (96 tons, 16 guns, 63 men) whose sailing master was Alexander Selkirk and captain was Thomas Stradling. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... Smokeless powder Gunpowder is an explosive mixture that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot gas which can be used as a propellant in firearms. ... Carpenter at work in Tennessee, June 1942. ... A knife is a sharp-edged (single or double edged) instrument consisting of a thin blade used for cutting and fitted with a handle. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Clothing protects the vulnerable nude human body from the extremes of weather, other features of our environment, and for safety reasons. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... These works of literature have each been claimed as the first novel in English. ...


Philip Ashton

Main article: Philip Ashton

Philip Ashton, born in Marblehead in New England in 1702, was captured by pirates while fishing near the coast of Nova Scotia in the June of 1722. He managed to escape in March 1723 when their ship landed at Roatán in the Bay Islands of Honduras, hiding in the jungle until the pirates left him there. He survived for 16 months, in spite of many insects, tropical heat and alligators. He had no equipment at all until he met another castaway, an Englishman. The Englishman disappeared after a few days but he left behind a knife, gunpowder, tobacco and more. Ashton was finally rescued by the Diamond, a ship from Salem.[1] Philip Ashton (1702-?) stayed as a castaway on uninhabited Roatan Island in the Bay of Honduras for 16 months in 1723/1724. ... Philip Ashton (1702-?) stayed as a castaway on uninhabited Roatan Island in the Bay of Honduras for 16 months in 1723/1724. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1629 Incorporated 1649 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  19. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Roatán, located between the islands of Utila and Guanaja (), is the largest of Honduras Bay Islands. ... Islas de la Bahía (Bay Islands) is one of the 18 departments into which the Central American nation of Honduras is divided. ... Box Log Falls, Lamington National Park, Queensland, Australia Jungle usually refers to a dense forest in a hot climate, such as a tropical rainforest. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - City  18. ...


Leendert Hasenbosch

Main article: Leendert Hasenbosch

Leendert Hasenbosch was a Dutch ship's officer (a bookkeeper), probably born in 1695. He was set ashore on uninhabited Ascension Island on 5 May 1725 as a punishment for sodomy. He was left behind with a tent and a survival kit and an amount of water for about four weeks. He had bad luck that no ships called at the island during his stay. He ate seabirds and green turtles but he probably died of thirst after about six months. He wrote a diary that was found by British mariners in January 1726 who brought the diary to Britain. The diary was rewritten and published a number of times. Leendert Hasenbosch, (c. ... Jan. ... Anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Georgetown Largest city Georgetown Official languages English Government Dependency of St. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... Seabirds are birds that spend much of their lives, outside the breeding season at least, at sea. ... Binomial name Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758) This page redirects from Chelonia, which is the genus name of this turtle, but has also been used for the order Testudines of all turtles and tortoises. ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ...


As late as 2002 the full truth of the story was disclosed in a book by the Dutch historian Michiel Koolbergen (1953–2002), the first book to mention Leendert by name; before that time, the castaway's name had been unknown. The story is available in English.[2] For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Charles Barnard

Main article: Charles Barnard

In 1812, the British ship Isabella, captained by George Higton, was shipwrecked off Eagle Island (part of the Falkland Islands). Most of the crew were rescued by the American sealer Nanina, commanded by Captain Charles Barnard. However, realising that they would require more provisions for the expanded number of passengers, Barnard and a few others went out in a party to retrieve more food. During his absence the Nanina was taken over by the British crew, who left them on the island. Barnard and his party were finally rescued in November of 1814. In 1829, Barnard wrote A Narrative of the Sufferings and Adventures of Captain Charles Barnard detailing the happenings. Captain Charles Barnard (1781–circa 1840) was a famous castaway. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Speedwell Island is one of the Falkland Islands, lying in the Falkland Sound, southwest of East Falkland. ... ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Other castaways

Gerald W. Kingsland was a journalist and writer born in Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, England on 8 March 1930. ... Nakahama John Manjiro. ... Tom Neale autobiography Tom Neale (November 6, 1902- November 27, 1977) was a New Zealander who spent most of his life in the Cook Islands and 16 years in three sessions living alone on the island of Suwarrow. ... Japanese drawing of Otokichi in 1849, as he visited Japan passing for a Chinese man. ... Pedro Serrano was a Spanish sailor who was supposed to have been marooned for seven or eight years in the sixteenth century on a small desert island. ... Juana María (died October 18, 1853), better known to history as The Lone Woman of San Nicolas (her Indian name is unknown), was a Native American woman of the now-extinct Nicoleño tribe who lived alone on San Nicolas Island from 1835 until her discovery in 1853. ... Ada Blackjack, (1898-1983) was an Inuit woman who lived for two years as a castaway on uninhabited Wrangel Island in northern Siberia. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Russian island. ... Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton CVO, OBE (15 February 1874 – 5 January 1922) was an Irish explorer, knighted for the success of the British Antarctic Expedition (1907 - 09) under his command, but now chiefly remembered for his Antarctic expedition of 1914–1916 in the ship Endurance, which is colloquially known as... A NASA satellite photograph of Elephant Island Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Alain Bombard (October 27, 1924 - July 19, 2005) was a French biologist and physician famous for sailing across the Atlantic Ocean in a small boat. ... The mutineers turning Lt Bligh and some of the officers and crew adrift from HMAV Bounty, 29 April 1789. ... Animation of the tsunami caused by the earthquake (see also the full-length version) The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... // Just before sunrise, on October 28th, 2005, Lucio Rendón, Salvador Ordóñez and Jesús Eduardo Vidaña, along with two other companions, set forth from the Mexican port of San Blas, in the State of Nayarit, to catch sharks 30 miles south of the Islas Marias in a...

Castaways in popular culture

Robinson Crusoe and Man Friday by Carl Offterdinger.

Various novels, television shows and films tell the story of castaways: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ...

Castaways are part of other stories as well, where the event is not the central plot but is still an important aspect. Examples include: For the recently concluded season, see Survivor: Fiji. ... Baby Island is a novel by Carol Ryrie Brink, published in 1937. ... Carol Ryrie Brink (1895-1981) was a United States author. ... The Blue Lagoon is a romance novel by Henry De Vere Stacpoole, first published in 1908. ... Henry De Vere Stacpoole (April 9, 1863 — April 12, 1951) was a Victorian period author, born in Kingstown, Ireland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christa Brooke Camille Shields[1] (born May 31, 1965) is an American actress and supermodel. ... Christopher Atkins on the cover of Playgirl Magazine, 1983 Christopher Atkins smiling Christopher Atkins (born Christopher Bowman on February 21, 1961 in Rye, New York) is an American actor and was a popular teen idol. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer. ... Robert Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... Castaway VHS cover Castaway is a 1986 film starring Amanda Donohoe and Oliver Reed, and directed by Nicolas Roeg. ... 1983 book Castaway published by Victor Gollancz Ltd. ... Lucy Irvine, a British writer who wrote the 1983 book Castaway published by Victor Gollancz Ltd. ... Amanda Donohoe (born June 29, 1962) is an English actress. ... Robert Oliver Reed (February 13, 1938 – May 2, 1999) was an English actor known for his macho image on and off screen. ... Castaway 2000 was a show commissioned by the BBC in 2000 that took 36 men, women and children from the British public and placed them on Taransay, a remote Scotish island in the Outer Hebrides for a year. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming which presents purportedly unscripted dramatic or humorous situations, documents actual events, and features ordinary people instead of professional actors. ... The Isle of Taransay Taransay (Tarasaigh in Gaelic), is an island in the Scottish Outer Hebrides. ... Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ... This computer/video game related article needs cleanup. ... The Learning Company (TLC) is an American educational software company, founded in 1980. ... For the NES video game, see The Adventures of Gilligans Island. ... Television series redirects here. ... A situation comedy, usually referred to as a sitcom, is a genre of comedy programs which originated in radio. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... Hatchet is a 1987 Newbery Honor award-winning wilderness survival novel written by Gary Paulsen. ... A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... Wilderness is generally defined as a natural environment on Earth that has not been modified by human activity. ... A survivalist is a person who anticipates and prepares for a future disruption in local, regional or worldwide social or political order. ... Island of the Blue Dolphins is a novel for children, written by Scott ODell. ... Life of Pi is a novel by Canadian author Yann Martel. ... Johnny Castaway is a screensaver released in 1993 by Sierra Entertainment, also known as Screen Antics. ... For other uses, see Lord of the Flies (disambiguation). ... Sir William Gerald Golding (19 September 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature (1983), best known for his novel Lord of the Flies. ... “LOST” redirects here. ... Mr. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Map of Lincoln Island Cyrus Smith blessing Captain Nemo on his death bed in The Mysterious Island The Mysterious Island (original title: LÃŽle mystérieuse) is a French novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. ... Jules Gabriel Verne (February 8, 1828–March 24, 1905) was a French author who pioneered the science-fiction genre. ... Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Alexander Selkirk, born Alexander Selcraig, (1676–13 December 1721) was a Scottish sailor who spent four years as a castaway on an uninhabited island; it is probable that his travails provided the inspiration for Defoes Robinson Crusoe. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... These works of literature have each been claimed as the first novel in English. ... The Swiss Family Robinson (Der Schweizerische Robinson) is a novel, first published in 1812, about a Swiss family who is shipwrecked in the East Indies en route to Port Jackson, Australia. ... Johann David Wyss (Bern, March 4, 1743 - 1818) was a Swiss author, best remembered for his book The Swiss Family Robinson (1812), based on the Robinson Crusoe adventure by Daniel Defoe. ...

The idea of a character becoming a castaway is common in television series, particularly ones that utilise the scenario for comic effect – it is a more extreme version of a character being stranded, but less likely and therefore more appropriate for non-serious series. Series that have had an episode about castaways include: The Black Stallion is a 1979 film adapted by Melissa Mathison, Jeanne Rosenberg and William D. Wittliff from the 1941 classic childrens novel by Walter Farley. ... The Road To El Dorado DVD cover The Road To El Dorado is an animated film by DreamWorks SKG released in 2000. ... Titanic is a 1997 romantic drama film directed, written, and co-produced by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ...

Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... Perfect Castaway is an episode from the fourth season of the FOX animated series Family Guy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tanner Island ( ) is the westernmost and largest of the Pickersgill Islands, rising to 145 m off the south coast of South Georgia. ... Futurama is an Emmy Award-winning animated American sitcom created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen for the Fox network. ... Obsoletely Fabulous is the fourteenth episode of the fourth production season of Futurama. ... The Mighty Boosh is a British cult comedy about two friends who go on magical adventures. ...

Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs is a BBC Radio 4 chatshow in which the subject is invited to consider themselves as a castaway on a desert island, and then select their eight favourite records, favourite book and a luxury inanimate object to occupy their time. This concept has become so widespread as to have become a part of popular culture. Desert Island Discs is a long-running BBC Radio 4 programme. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


See also

A desert island in Palau. ... Marooning is the act of leaving someone behind intentionally in an uninhabited area. ... A stowaway (also stoweaway) is a person who travels illegally, by airplane, bus, ship or train. ... Castaway 2000 was a show commissioned by the BBC in 2000 that took 36 men, women and children from the British public and placed them on Taransay, a remote Scotish island in the Outer Hebrides for a year. ... Castaway 2007 is a follow-up to the BBC series Castaway 2000 in which 36 men, women and children from the British public moved to a remote Scottish island for a year. ...

References

  1. ^ "Pirate Biographies" at The New England Pirate Museum. Accessed 4 December 2005.
  2. ^ Alex Ritsema, book "A Dutch Castaway on Ascension Island in 1725" ISBN 978-1-4116-9832-1 2006 and Michiel Koolbergen, book "Een Hollandse Robinson Crusoë", ISBN ISBN 90-74622-23-2 2002

December 4th redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Cecil Adams is a name, generally assumed to be a pseudonym, which designates the unknown author or authors of The Straight Dope, a popular question and answer column published in The Chicago Reader since 1973. ... December 2 is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Straight Dope is a popular question and answer newspaper column published in the Chicago Reader (an alternative weekly), syndicated in thirty newspapers in the United States and Canada, and available online. ... December 4th redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Castaways - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (295 words)
The Castaways was a Las Vegas hotel and casino that operated from 1963 to 1987 on the Las Vegas Strip.
In 1969 or 1970, the Castaways was sold to billionaire Howard Hughes for $3 million as part of his spree of buying Las Vegas properties.
The property was purchased in 1987 by Steve Wynn, who then proceeded with his plans to build a new resort on the Castaways' former grounds.
Las Vegas SUN: Potential buyers weigh Castaways' potential (890 words)
Three weeks after closing, the Castaways is generating interest from prospective buyers, including a trio of small casino owners who've toured the property and are interested in buying and reopening the 49-year-old hotel-casino.
Castaways owner Vestin Mortgage bought the bankrupt property for $20.7 million on Feb. 1 at a foreclosure sale after its bankrupt former owners were unable to satisfy terms of a $22 million-plus mortgage note, and is now marketing the property for sale, Vestin spokesman Steve Stern said.
Meanwhile, Castaways gamblers who have yet to redeem the casino's chips or who have winning race or sports book tickets will probably have to wait a couple weeks to find out the former casino owners' plan to redeem them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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