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Encyclopedia > Cassius Dio

Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. 155 to 163/164[1]– after 229), known in English as Cassius Dio or Dio Cassius, was a noted Roman historian and public servant. Dio published a Roman history embracing a period of 983 years, from the arrival of Aeneas in Italy through the subsequent founding of Rome and then to 229. Of the eighty books, written over twenty-two years, many survived into the modern age intact or as fragments, providing a detailed perspective on Roman history. Events Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius starts a new war against the Parthians Pope Anicetus succeeds Pope Pius I First year of Yongshou era of the Chinese Han Dynasty Births Dio Cassius, Roman historian Cao Cao, future ruler of the Kingdom of Wei Deaths July 11 - Pope Pius I Saint Polycarp... Events Statius Priscus reconquers Armenia; Artaxata is ruined. ... Events Ctesiphon is captured by the Romans, but returned to the Parthians after the end of the war. ... Events Foundation of Jiankang (Nanjing) Sun Quan formally declares himself Emperor of Wu Births Deaths Dio Cassius (approximate date) Categories: 229 ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... An historian is someone who writes history, a written accounting of the past. ... A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy, usually within an institution of the government. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Events Foundation of Jiankang (Nanjing) Sun Quan formally declares himself Emperor of Wu Births Deaths Dio Cassius (approximate date) Categories: 229 ...

Contents

Biography

Cassius Dio was the son of Cassius Apronianus, a Roman Senator. He was born and raised at Nicaea in Bithynia. Cassius Dio’s mother was the daughter of Greek historian, orator, and philosopher Dio Chrysostom. He was of Roman and Greek heritage. He wrote in the Greek language, but he must be considered as a Roman due to his senatorial position as well as the relative harmony that existed between nobility in the Greek and Roman worlds. Despite this Dio always maintained a love for his Greek hometown of Nicaea, calling it 'his home' as opposed to his description of his villa in Italy ('my residence in Italy'). Cassius Apronianus or Apronianus (died 180 AD) was a Roman who lived in the second century. ... Iznik (formerly Nicaea) is a city in Anatolia (now part of Turkey) which is known primarily as the site of two major meetings (or Ecumenical councils) in the early history of the Christian church. ... Bithynia was an ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Euxine (today Black Sea). ... Dio Chrysostom, Dion of Prusa or Dio Cocceianus ( 40 AD– 120 AD) was a Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Roman Empire in the first century. ... Greek ( IPA: or IPA: — Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in that language family. ...


Cassius Dio passed the greater part of his life in public service. He was a senator under Commodus and governor of Smyrna after the death of Septimius Severus; and afterwards suffect consul around 205, as also proconsul in Africa and Pannonia. Alexander Severus held him in the highest esteem and made him his consul again, even though his severity irritated the Praetorian Guards, who demanded his life. Following his second consulship, being advanced in years, he returned to his native country, where he died. Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus (August 31, 161–December 31, 192) was a Roman Emperor who ruled from 180 to 192. ... İzmir (Ottoman Turkish: إزمير İzmir, Greek: Σμύρνη Smýrnē, Armenian: Իզմիր Izmir, Italian: Smirne, Ladino: Izmir, without the Turkish dotted I) is the third most populous city of Turkey and the countrys largest port after İstanbul. ... Lucius Septimius Severus (b. ... Consul (abbrev. ... Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ...


Roman History

Dio published a Roman History, in eighty books, the fruit of his researches and labours of twenty-two years. It embraced a period of 983 years, extending from the arrival of Aeneas in Italy, and the subsequent founding of Rome, to 229. Down to the time of Julius Caesar, he only gives a summary of events; after this, he enters somewhat more into details; and from the time of Commodus he is very circumspect in relating what passed under his own eyes. Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Events Foundation of Jiankang (Nanjing) Sun Quan formally declares himself Emperor of Wu Births Deaths Dio Cassius (approximate date) Categories: 229 ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in classical antiquity. ...


We have fragments remaining of the first 36 books: but there is a considerable portion of the 35th book, on the war of Lucullus against Mithridates VI of Pontus, and of the 36th, on the war with the pirates and the expedition of Pompey against the king of Pontus. The books that follow, to the 54th inclusive, are nearly all complete: they cover the period from 65 BC to 12 BC, or from the eastern campaign of Pompey and the death of Mithridates to the death of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. The 55th book has a considerable gap in it. The 56th to the 60th, both included, which comprehend the period from 9 to 54, are complete, and contain the events from the defeat of Varus in Germany to the death of Claudius. Of the following 20 books, we have only fragments and the meagre abridgment of John Xiphilinus, a monk of the XI century. The 80th or last book comprehends the period from 222 to 229, in the reign of Alexander Severus. The abridgment of Xiphilinus, as now extant, commences with the 35th and continues to the end of the 80th book. It is a very indifferent performance, and was made by order of the emperor Michael VII Parapinaces. Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c. ... A silver coin depicting Mithradates VI of Pontus. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC 8 BC 7 BC... Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (63 BC–12 BC) was a Roman statesman and general. ... For other uses, see 9 (disambiguation). ... Events October 13 - Roman Empire emperor Claudius dies after being poisoned by Agrippina, his wife and niece. ... The Defeated Varus (2003), a sculpture by Wilfried Koch in Haltern am See, Germany. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Joannes Xiphilinus, epitomator of Dio Cassius, lived at Constantinople during the latter half of the 11th century AD. He was a monk and the nephew of Patriarch John VIII of Constatinople, a well-known preacher (Migne, Patrologia Graeca, cxx. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Events Foundation of Jiankang (Nanjing) Sun Quan formally declares himself Emperor of Wu Births Deaths Dio Cassius (approximate date) Categories: 229 ... Michael VII Ducas or Parapinakes, was the eldest son of Constantine X Ducas and Eudocia Macrembolitissa. ...


The fragments of the first 36 books, as now collected, are of four kinds:

  1. Fragmenta Valesiana, such as were dispersed throughout various writers, scholiasts, grammarians, lexicographers, etc., and were collected by Henri de Valois.
  2. Fragmenta Peiresciana, comprising large extracts, found in the section entitled "Of Virtues and Vices", in the great collection or portative library compiled by order of Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus. The manuscript of this belonged to Peiresc.
  3. The fragments of the first 34 books, preserved in the second section of the same work of Constantine's, entitled “Of Embassies.” These are known under the name of Fragmenta Ursiniana, because the manuscript containing them was found in Sicily by Fulvio Orsini.
  4. Excerpta Vaticana, by Mai, which contain fragments of books 1 to 35, and 61 to 80. To these are added the fragments of an unknown continuator of Dio, which go down to the time of Constantine. Other fragments from Dio belonging chiefly to the first 34 books were found by Mai in two Vatican MSS., which contain a collection made by Maximus Planudes. The annals of Joannes Zonaras also contain numerous extracts from Dio.

Fragmenta Valesiana, is a Roman text Written by Dio Cassius, and was dispersed throughout various writers, scholiasts, grammarians, lexicographers, etc. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) (Constantinople, 905 – November 9, 959 in Constantinople) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karvounopsina. ... A continuator, in literature, is a writer who creates a new work based on someone elses prior text, such as a novel or novel fragment. ... Bronze statue of Constantine I in York, England, near the spot where he was proclaimed Emperor in 306 For other uses, see Constantine I (disambiguation). ... Maximus Planudes (c. ... Joannes (John) Zonaras, Byzantine chronicler and theologian, flourished at Constantinople in the 12th century. ...

Literary style

Dio has taken Thucydides for his model, but the imitator is not comparable with his original either in arrangement and the distribution of materials or in soundness of view and accurate reasoning. His style is generally clear, where there appears to be no corruption of the text, though full of Latinisms. His diligence is unquestionable, and, from his opportunities, he was well acquainted with the circumstances of the Empire during the period for which he is a contemporary authority. Bust of Thucydides residing in the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. ...


Notes

  1. ^ According to some scholars, such as Millar (Millar, F., A study of Cassius Dio, Oxford 1966, p. 13), he was born later, in 163/164.

References

Fergus Millar FBA is Camden Professor of Ancient History Emeritus Oxford University. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Fergus Millar FBA is Camden Professor of Ancient History Emeritus Oxford University. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ...

External links

  • Cassius Dio, Roman History (English translation on LacusCurtius)
  • Works by Cassius Dio at Project Gutenberg

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dio Cassius - LoveToKnow 1911 (577 words)
His father was Cassius Apronianus, governor of Dalmatia and Cilicia under Marcus Aurelius, and on his mother's side he was the grandson of Dio Chrysostom, who had assumed the surname of Cocceianus in honour of his patron the emperor Cocceius Nerva.
During the reign of Commodus, Dio practised as an advocate at the Roman bar, and held the offices of aedile and quaestor.
Dio's work is a most important authority for the history of the last years of the republic and the early empire.
DE VALSE ANTONINUS - Heliogabalus (5069 words)
Zijn moeder zou namelijk zo promiscue zijn geweest dat hij, in weerwil van elke biologische waarschijnlijkheid, uit ‘gevarieerd zaad’, dat wil zeggen het zaad van verscheidene mannen, was ontstaan.
Cassius Dio, die wist wie Heliogabalus’ werkelijke vader was, noemt hem in zijn geschiedwerk keer op keer spottend de ‘Valse Antoninus’.
Dio’s spotnaam ‘Valse Antoninus’ is een antwoord op deze keizerlijke zelfverheerlijking, waarmee de geschiedschrijver aangeeft niets te geloven van de dynastieke claim waarmee Heliogabalus de steun van de soldaten verwierf.
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