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Encyclopedia > Cassia
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Cassia
from Koehler's Medicinal-Plants (1887)
from Koehler's Medicinal-Plants (1887)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Laurales
Family: Lauraceae
Genus: Cinnamomum
Species: C. aromaticum
Binomial name
Cinnamomum aromaticum
Nees

Cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum, synonym C. cassia), also called Chinese cinnamon, is an evergreen tree native to southern China and mainland Southeast Asia west to Myanmar. Like its close relative, Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, also known as "true cinnamon" or "Ceylon cinnamon"), it is used primarily for its aromatic bark, which is used as a spice, often under the culinary name of "cinnamon". Image File history File links Koeh-039. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... It has been suggested that Angiospermae, and Anthophyta be merged into this article or section. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families Atherospermataceae Calycanthaceae Gomortegaceae Hernandiaceae Lauraceae Monimiaceae Siparunaceae The Laurales are an order of flowering plants. ... Genera Many; see text The Lauraceae or Laurel family comprises a group of flowering plants included in the order Laurales. ... Species See text Cinnamomum is a genus of evergreen trees and shrubs belonging to the Laurel family, Lauraceae. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Christian Gottfried Daniel Nees von Esenbeck in 1855 Christian Gottfried Daniel Nees von Esenbeck (February 14, 1776 - March 16, German botanist, physician, zoologist, and natural philosopher. ... A Silver Fir shoot showing three successive years of retained leaves In botany, an evergreen plant is a plant which retains its leaves year-round, with each leaf persisting for more than 12 months. ... For other uses, see Tree (disambiguation). ... Indochina 1886 Indochina, or the Indochinese Peninsula, is a region in Southeast Asia. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Screen shot of Spice OPUS, a fork of Berkeley SPICE SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) is a general purpose analog circuit simulator. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Cassia tree grows to 10-15 m tall, with greyish bark, and hard elongated leaves 10-15 cm long, that have a decidedly reddish colour when young. “Foliage” redirects here. ...

Contents

Production and uses

Young Cassia tree, Indonesia
Young Cassia tree, Indonesia

Cassia is a close relative to the cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, or "true cinnamon"), Saigon Cinnamon (Cinnamomum loureiroi, also known as "Vietnamese Cinnamon"), Camphor Laurel (Cinnamomum camphora), Malabathrum (Cinnamomum tamala) and Cinnamomum burmannii trees. As with these species, the dried bark of cassia is used as a spice. Cassia's flavour, however, is less delicate than that of true cinnamon; for this reason the less expensive cassia is sometimes called "bastard cinnamon". young cinnamnon tree, Kerinci, Sumatra, Indonesia. ... young cinnamnon tree, Kerinci, Sumatra, Indonesia. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum loureiroi Nees Saigon Cinnamon (Cinnamomum loureiroi, also known as Vietnamese cinnamon or Vietnamese cassia) is an evergreen tree in the genus Cinnamomum, indigenous to mainland Southeast Asia. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Sieb. ... Malabathrum, also known as Malabar leaf is the name used in classical and medieval texts for the leaf of the plant Cinnamomum tamala. ... One of several plants whose bark is sold as the spice cinnamon[1]. The spice is similar in character to cassia, the most common type of cinnamon in the US, but may have less of the mildly toxic substance coumarin than does cassia[2]. It is sometimes known as Indonesian...


Whole branches and small trees are harvested for cassia bark, unlike the small shoots used in the production of cinnamon; this gives cassia bark a much thicker and rougher texture than that of true cinnamon. Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ...


Most of the spice sold as cinnamon in the United States and Canada (where true cinnamon is still generally unknown) is actually cassia. In some cases, cassia is labeled "Indonesian cinnamon" to distinguish it from the more expensive true cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), which is the preferred form of the spice used in Mexico and Europe [1], although "Indonesian cinnamon" can also refer to Cinnamomum burmannii, which is also commonly sold in the United States, labeled only as cinnamon. Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... One of several plants whose bark is sold as the spice cinnamon[1]. The spice is similar in character to cassia, the most common type of cinnamon in the US, but may have less of the mildly toxic substance coumarin than does cassia[2]. It is sometimes known as Indonesian...


Cassia is produced in both mainland and island Southeast Asia. Up to the 1960s Vietnam was the world's most important producer of Saigon Cinnamon, a species so closely related to cassia that it was often marketed as cassia (or, in North America, "cinnamon"). Because of the disruption caused by the Vietnam War, however, production of cassia in the highlands of the Indonesian island of Sumatra was increased to meet demand, and Indonesia remains one of the main exporters of cassia today. Saigon Cinnamon, only having become available again in the United States since the early 21st century, has an intense flavour and aroma and a higher percentage of essential oils than Indonesian cassia. Tung Hing, a rarer form of cassia produced in China, is said to be sweeter and more peppery than Indonesian cassia.[2] Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Sumatra (also spelled Sumatera) is the sixth largest island in the world (approximately 470,000 km²) and is the largest island entirely in Indonesia (two larger islands, Borneo and New Guinea, are partially in Indonesia). ...


Cassia bark (both powdered and in whole, or "stick" form) is used as a flavouring agent, for candies, desserts, baked goods, and meat; it is specified in many curry recipes, where cinnamon is less suitable. Cassia is sometimes added to true cinnamon but is a much thicker, coarser product. Cassia is sold as pieces of bark (as pictured below) or as neat quills or sticks. Cassia sticks can be distinguished from true Cinnamon sticks in the following manner: Cinnamon sticks have many thin layers and can easily be made into powder using a coffee or spice grinder, whereas Cassia sticks are extremely hard, are usually made up of one thick layer and can break an electric spice or coffee grinder if one attempts to grind them without first breaking them into very small pieces. Chicken tikka jalfrezi, pilau rice and a cucumber rhaita. ...


Cassia buds, although rare, are also occasionally used as a spice. They resemble cloves in appearance and flavor.[3]


Health benefits and risks

Dried cassia bark
Dried cassia bark

Cassia (called ròu gùi; 桂 in Chinese) is used in traditional Chinese medicine, where it is considered one of the 50 fundamental herbs. Image File history File links Cassia bark - photo MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Cassia bark - photo MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... Herbology is the art of combining medicinal herbs. ...


A 2003 study published in the DiabetesCare journal[1] followed Type 2 diabetics ingesting 1, 3 or 6 grams of cassia daily. Those taking 6 grams shows changes after 20 days, and those taking lesser doses showed changes after 40 days. Regardless of the amount of cassia taken, they reduced their mean fasting serum glucose levels 18–29%, their triglyceride levels 23–30%, their LDL cholesterol 7–27%, and their total cholesterol 12–26%, over others taking placebos.


The effects, which may even be produced by brewing a tea from cassia bark, may also be beneficial for non-diabetics to prevent and control elevated glucose and blood lipid levels. Cassia's effects on enhancing insulin sensitivity appear to be mediated by polyphenols [4]. Despite these findings, cassia should not be used in place of anti-diabetic drugs, unless blood glucose levels are closely monitored and its use is combined with a strictly controlled diet and exercise program. Insulin sensitivity is the opposite of insulin resistance. ... Polyphenols are a group of plant chemical substances, characterized by the presence of more than one phenol group per molecule. ... An anti-diabetic drug or oral hypoglycemic agent is used to treat diabetes mellitus. ...


There is also much anecdotal evidence that consumption of cassia has a strong effect in lowering blood pressure, making it potentially useful to those suffering from hypertension. The USDA has three ongoing studies that are monitoring the blood pressure effect. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Though the spice has been used for thousands of years, there is concern that there is as yet no knowledge about the potential for toxic buildup of the fat-soluble components in cassia, as anything fat-soluble could potentially be subject to toxic buildup. There are no concluded long term clinical studies on the use of cassia for health reasons. Fat soluble refers to properties of compounds in our bodies that are attracted to and accumulated in fat cells within the body. ...


European health agencies have warned against consuming high amounts of cassia, due to a toxic component called coumarin.[2] Coumarin is a chemical compound found in many plants, notably in high concentration in the tonka bean, woodruff, and bison grass. ...


History

In classical times, four types of cinnamon were distinguished (and often confused):

  • Cassia (Hebrew qəṣi`â), the bark of Cinnamomum iners from Arabia and Ethiopia
  • Cinnamon proper (Hebrew qinnamon), the bark of Cinnamomum zeylanicum from Sri Lanka
  • Malabathrum or Malobathrum (from Sanskrit तमालपत्त्रम्, tamālapattram, literally "dark-tree leaves"), Cinnamomum malabathrum from the North of India
  • Serichatum, Cinnamomum aromaticum from Seres, that is, China.

In Exodus 30:23-4, Moses is ordered to use both sweet cinnamon (Kinnamon) and cassia (qəṣî`â) together with myrrh, sweet calamus (qənê-bosem, literally cane of fragrance) and olive oil to produce a holy oil to anoint the Ark of the Covenant. Psalm 45, 8, mentions the garments of Torah scholars that smell of myrrh, aloes and cassia. Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Malabathrum, also known as Malabar leaf is the name used in classical and medieval texts for the leaf of the plant Cinnamomum tamala. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is an old Indo-Aryan language from the Indian Subcontinent, the classical literary language of the Hindus of India[1], a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Seres (Σηρες) was the ancient Greek and Roman name for the northwestern part of China and its inhabitants. ... It has been suggested that Pharaoh of the Exodus be merged into this article or section. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... 100g of Myrrh. ... Calamus may mean: Sweet flag Acorus calamus, an herb Calamus (palm genus), a genus of rattan palms Calamus (fish genus), a genus of porgies (Sparidae) Calamus, Iowa Calamus, Wisconsin Calamus, a DTP application This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... A bottle of olive oil. ... The holy anointing oil described in Exodus 30:22-25 was created from 500 shekels (about 6 kg) of myrrh, half as much (about 3 kg) of fragrant cinnamon, 250 shekels (about 3 kg) of fragrant cane (calamus,cannabis), 500 shekels (about 6kg) of cassia, and a hin (about 4... A late 19th-century artists conception of the Ark of the Covenant, employing a Renaissance cassone for the Ark and cherubim as latter-day Christian angels The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone... Tora redirects here. ... Agarwood or eaglewood is the most expensive wood in the world. ...


The first Greek reference to kasia is found in a poem by Sappho in the 7th century B.C. This article refers to the Greek poet. ...


According to Herodotus, both cinnamon and cassia grow in Arabia, together with incense, myrrh, and ladanum, and are guarded by winged serpents. The phoenix builds its nest from cinnamon and cassia. But Herodotus mentions other writers that see the home of Dionysos, e.g. India, as the source of cassia. While Theophrastus gives a rather good account of the plants, but a curious method for harvesting (worms eat away the wood and leave the bark behind), Dioscorides seems to confuse the plant with some kind of water-lily. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Labdanum is a sticky brown resin obtained from the shrub Cistus ladanifer, more commonly known as the rock rose. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... Bacchus by Caravaggio Dionysus, the name of a god, is occasionally confused with one of several historical figures named Dionysius. ... Theophrastus (Greek Θεόφραστος, 370 — about 285 BC), a native of Eressos in Lesbos, was the successor of Aristotle in the Peripatetic school. ... Pedanius Dioscorides Pedanius Dioscorides (c. ...


Pliny (nat. 12, 86-87) gives a fascinating account of the early spice trade across the Red Sea in "rafts without sails or oars", obviously using the trade winds, that costs Rome 100 million sesterces each year. According to Pliny, a pound (the Roman pound, 327 g) of cassia, cinnamon or serichatum cost up to 300 denars, the wage of ten month's labour. Diocletian's Edict on Maximum Prices from 301 AD gives a price of 125 denars for a pound of cassia, while an agricultural labourer earned 25 denars per day. Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19c portrait. ... The trade winds are a pattern of wind that are found in bands around the Earths equatorial region. ... The sestertius was an ancient Roman coin. ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus ( 245– 312), born Diocles (Greek Διοκλής) and known in English as Diocletian,[1] was Roman Emperor from November 20, 284 to May 1, 305. ... The Edict on Maximum Prices (also known as the Edict on Prices or the Edict of Diocletian; in Latin Edictum De Pretiis Rerum Venalium) was issued in 301 by Roman Emperor Diocletian. ...


The Greeks used kásia or malabathron to flavour wine, together with absinth (Artemisia absinthia). Pliny mentions cassia as a flavouring agent for wine as well (Plin. nat. 14, 107f.). Malabathrum leaves (folia) were used in cooking and for distilling an oil used in a caraway-sauce for oysters by the Roman gourmet Gaius Gavius Apicius (de re coquinaria I, 29, 30; IX, 7). Malabathrum is among the spices that, according to Apicius, any good kitchen should contain. Binomial name Artemisia absinthium L. Artemisia absinthium (Absinth Wormwood, Wormwood or Grand Wormwood) is a species of wormwood, native to temperate regions of Europe, Asia and northern Africa. ... Apicius was a name applied to three celebrated Roman epicures, the first of whom lived during the Republic; the second of whom, Marcus Gavius (or Gabius) Apicius—the most famous in his own time—lived under the early Empire; a third lived in the late 4th or early 5th century. ...


Egyptian recipes for kyphi, an aromatic used for burning, included cinnamon and cassia from Hellenistic times onwards. The gifts of Hellenistic rulers to temples sometimes included cassia and cinnamon as well as incense, myrrh, and Indian incense (kostos), so we can conclude that the Greeks used it in this way too. 100g of Myrrh. ...


The famous Commagenum, an unguent produced in Commagene in present-day eastern Turkey was made from goose-fat and aromatised with cinnamon oil and spikenard (Nardostachys jatamansi). Malobrathum from Egypt (Dioscorides I, 63) was based on cattle-fat and contained cinnamon as well; one pound cost 300 denars. The Roman poet Martial (VI, 55) makes fun of Romans who drip unguents, smell of cassia and cinnamon taken from a bird's nest and look down on him who does not smell at all. Roman province of Commagene, 120 CE Commagene (Greek Kομμαγηνη Kommagênê) was a small sometime kingdom, located in modern south-central Turkey, with its capital at Samosata (modern Samsat, near the Euphrates). ... Binomial name Nardostachys grandiflora DC. Spikenard (also nard and muskroot) is a flowering plant of the Valerian family that grows in the Himalayas of India and Nepal. ...


Cinnamon, as a warm and dry substance, was believed by doctors in ancient times to cure snakebites, freckles, the common cold, and kidney troubles, among other ailments.


Related species

Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Malabathrum, also known as Malabar leaf is the name used in classical and medieval texts for the leaf of the plant Cinnamomum tamala. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum loureiroi Nees Saigon Cinnamon (Cinnamomum loureiroi, also known as Vietnamese cinnamon or Vietnamese cassia) is an evergreen tree in the genus Cinnamomum, indigenous to mainland Southeast Asia. ...

References

  • Dalby, Andrew (1996). Siren Feasts: A History of Food and Gastronomy in Greece. London: Routledge.
  • Faure, Paul (1987). Parfums et aromates de l'antiquité. Paris: Fayard.
  • Paszthoty, Emmerich (1992). Salben, Schminken und Parfüme im Altertum. Mainz, Germany: Zabern.
  • Paterson, Wilma (1990). A Fountain of Gardens: Plants and Herbs from the Bible. Edinburgh.
  1. ^ Cinnamon Improves Glucose and Lipids of People With Type 2 Diabetes
  2. ^ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6672644

en:Cassia

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Herbs and spices
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Basil · Bay leaf · Boldo · Borage · Cannabis · Chervil · Chives · Coriander leaf (cilantro) · Curry leaf · Dill · Epazote · Eryngium foetidum (long coriander) · Hoja santa · Holy basil · Houttuynia cordata (giấp cá) · Hyssop · Lavender · Lemon grass · Limnophila aromatica (rice paddy herb) · Lovage · Marjoram · Mint · Oregano · Parsley · Perilla · Rosemary · Rue · Sage · Savory · Sorrel · Stevia · Tarragon · Thai basil · Thyme · Vietnamese coriander (rau răm) dvdsvdxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hÉ™()b, or É™b; see pronunciation differences) are plants grown for any purpose other than food, wood or beauty. ... Screen shot of Spice OPUS, a fork of Berkeley SPICE SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) is a general purpose analog circuit simulator. ... Binomial name Ocimum basilicum L. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) of the Family Lamiaceae is also known as Sweet Basil. ... bay leaves Bay leaf (plural bay leaves) are the aromatic leaves of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina) is a plant native to the coastal region of Chile. ... Binomial name Borago officinalis L. Borage (Borago officinalis), also known as starflower, is an annual herb native to central and eastern Europe. ... Look up Cannabis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. ... Binomial name Allium schoenoprasum L. Chives (Allium schoenoprasum), is the smallest species of the onion family[1] Alliaceae, native to Europe, Asia and North America[2]. They are referred to only in the plural, because they grow in clumps rather than as individual plants. ... Binomial name Coriandrum sativum L. Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Binomial name Murraya koenigii (L.) Sprengel The Curry Tree or Curry-leaf Tree (Murraya koenigii; syn. ... Binomial name Anethum graveolens L. Dried Dill-umbel Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a short-lived annual herb, native to southwest and central Asia. ... Binomial name Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Epazote or Mexican Tea (Chenopodium ambrosioides) is a herb native to Central America and southern Mexico. ... Binomial name Eryngium foetidum L. Eryngium foetidum (also known as Bhandhanya, Chandon benit, Culantro, Fitweed, Long coriander, Mexican coriander, Wild coriander, Recao, Spiritweed, Ngo gai, Sawtooth, and Saw-leaf herb), is a tropical perennial and annual herb in the family Apiaceae. ... Binomial name Piper auritum Kunth Hoja santa (Piper auritum, synonymous with Piper sanctum[1]) is an aromatic herb with a heart shaped leaf which grows in tropic Mesoamerica. ... Binomial name Ocimum tenuiflorum L. Synonyms Ocimum sanctum L. The Tulsi (also known as Tulasi) plant or Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) is an important symbol in many Hindu religious traditions. ... Genera See text. ... Species See text Hyssop (Hyssopus) is a genus of about 10-12 species of herbaceous or semi-woody plants in the family Lamiaceae, native from the Mediterranean east to central Asia. ... Binomial name Lavandula officinalis Mill. ... Species About 55, see text Cymbopogon (lemon grass, lemongrass, citronella grass or fever grass) is a genus of about 55 species of grasses, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World. ... Binomial name Limnophila aromatica (Lam. ... Binomial name Levisticum officinale L. Koch. ... Binomial name Origanum majorana L. Marjoram (Origanum majorana, Lamiaceae) is a cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub with sweet pine and citrus flavors. ... “Mint” redirects here. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... Species Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Perilla is a genus of annual herb that is a member of the mint family, Lamiaceae. ... Binomial name Rosmarinus officinalis L. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant evergreen needle-like leaves. ... Binomial name Ruta graveolens L. The Common Rue (Ruta graveolens), also known as Herb-of-grace, is a species of rue grown as a herb. ... Binomial name Salvia officinalis L. Sage leaves Common sage (Salvia officinalis) is a small evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. ... Species hortensis (summer savory) montana (winter savory) viminea (serpentine savory) Savory is an herb, of the genus Satureja, best known for flavoring beans. ... Binomial name Rumex acetosa L. The common sorrel, or spinach dock, Ambada bhaji is a perennial herb, which grows abundantly in meadows in most parts of Europe and is cultivated as a leaf vegetable. ... Species About 150 species, including: Stevia eupatoria Stevia ovata Stevia plummerae Stevia rebaudiana Stevia salicifolia Stevia serrata Stevia (also called sweetleaf, sweet leaf or sugarleaf) is a genus of about 150 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central... Binomial name Artemisia dracunculus L. Tarragon or dragon (Artemisia dracunculus) is a perennial herb, a member of the daisy family (Asteraceae) and a close relative of wormwood. ... Thai Basil is a cultivar of basil and is a major ingredient in many Thai dishes. ... Species About 350 species, including: Thymus adamovicii Thymus bracteosus Thymus broussonetii Thymus caespititius Thymus camphoratus Thymus capitatus Thymus capitellatus Thymus carnosus Thymus cephalotus Thymus cherlerioides Thymus ciliatus Thymus cilicicus Thymus cimicinus Thymus comosus Thymus comptus Thymus doerfleri Thymus glabrescens Thymus herba-barona Thymus hirsutus Thymus hyemalis Thymus integer Thymus lanuginosus... Binomial name Persicaria odorata Lour. ...

Spices

African pepper · Ajwain (bishop's weed) · Allspice · Amchur (mango powder) · Anise · Aromatic ginger · Asafoetida · Camphor · Caraway · Cardamom · Cardamom, black · Cassia · Cayenne pepper · Celery seed · Chili · Cinnamon · Clove · Coriander seed · Cubeb · Cumin · Cumin, black · Dill seed · Fennel · Fenugreek · Fingerroot (krachai) · Galangal, greater · Galangal, lesser · Garlic · Ginger · Grains of paradise · Horseradish · Juniper berry · Liquorice · Mace · Mahlab · Malabathrum (tejpat) · Mustard, black · Mustard, white · Nigella (kalonji) · Nutmeg · Paprika · Pepper, black · Pepper, green · Pepper, long · Pepper, pink, Brazilian · Pepper, pink, Peruvian · Pepper, white · Pomegranate seed (anardana) · Poppy seed · Saffron · Sarsaparilla · Sassafras · Sesame · Sichuan Pepper · Star anise · Sumac · Tasmanian pepper · Tamarind · Turmeric · Wasabi · Zedoary The term Grains of Selim refers to the seeds of a shrubby tree, Xylopia aethiopica, found in Africa. ... Ajwain (also known as Carom, Ajowan, Bishops Weed and Seeds Of Bishops Weed), is an uncommon spice except in certain areas of Asia. ... Binomial name Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. ... Species About 35 species, including: Mangifera altissima Mangifera applanata Mangifera caesia Mangifera camptosperma Mangifera casturi Mangifera decandra Mangifera foetida Mangifera gedebe Mangifera griffithii Mangifera indica Mangifera kemanga Mangifera laurina Mangifera longipes Mangifera macrocarpa Mangifera mekongensis Mangifera odorata Mangifera pajang Mangifera pentandra Mangifera persiciformis Mangifera quadrifida Mangifera siamensis Mangifera similis Mangifera... Pimpinella species, but the name anise is frequently applied to Fennel. ... Binomial name Kaempferia galanga (Linn. ... Binomial name Ferula assafoetida L. Asafoetida (Ferula assafoetida, family Apiaceae) is a species of Ferula native to Iran. ... R-phrases 11-20/21/22-36/37/38 S-phrases 16-26-36 RTECS number EX1260000 (R) EX1250000 (S) Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... Categories: | | | | ... Genera Aframomum Amomum Elettaria The name cardamom (sometimes written cardamon) is used for species within three genera of the Ginger family (Zingiberaceae), namely Elettaria, Amomum and Aframomum. ... Binomial name Amomum subulatum Roxb. ... A large red cayenne Cayenne pepper is a hot red pepper used to flavor dishes; its name comes from the city of Cayenne in French Guiana. ... Binomial name Apium graveolens L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... The chili pepper, or more simply just chili, is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Binomial name Coriandrum sativum L. Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Binomial name Piper cubeba L. Cubeb (Piper cubeba), or tailed pepper, is a plant in genus Piper, cultivated for its fruit and essential oil. ... Binomial name Cuminum cyminum L. CAUTION: Cumin when taken in large amounts is a hallucinogen so enjoy in moderation. ... Binomial name Bunium persicum (Boiss. ... Binomial name Anethum graveolens L. Dried Dill-umbel Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a short-lived annual herb, native to southwest and central Asia. ... Binomial name Foeniculum vulgare Mill. ... Binomial name Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) belongs to the family Fabaceae. ... Binomial name Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf. ... Binomial name Alpinia galanga (L.) Willd. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Binomial name Allium sativum L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Binomial name Zingiber officinale Roscoe Ginger is commonly used as a spice in cuisines throughout the world. ... Binomial name Aframomum melegueta K. Schum. ... Binomial name Armoracia rusticana P.G. Gaertn. ... Juniper berries, here still attached to a branch, are actually modified conifer cones. ... Binomial name Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Liquorice or licorice (see spelling differences) (pronounced IPA: licorish) is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra, from which a sweet flavour can be extracted. ... Species About 100 species, including: Myristica argentea Myristica fragrans Myristica malabarica The nutmegs Myristica are a genus of evergreen trees indigenous to tropical southeast Asia and Australasia. ... Mahlab, Mahleb, or Mahlepi, is an aromatic spice from the puverized pit of the black cherry, Cerasus mahaleb or (Prunus mahaleb). ... Malabathrum, also known as Malabar leaf is the name used in classical and medieval texts for the leaf of the plant Cinnamomum tamala. ... Binomial name Brassica nigra L. Black mustard (Brassica nigra) is an annual weedy plant cultivated for its seeds, which are commonly used as a spice. ... Binomial name Sinapis alba White mustard (Sinapis alba) is a plant of the family Cruciferae. ... Binomial name Nigella sativa L. Nigella sativa is an annual flowering plant, native to southwest Asia. ... Species About 100 species, including: Myristica argentea Myristica fragrans Myristica malabarica The nutmegs Myristica are a genus of evergreen trees indigenous to tropical southeast Asia and Australasia. ... Bell peppers come in various shapes and colors, and are used to make paprika. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Species   (incl. ... Binomial name Piper longum L. Long pepper (Piper longum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi Brazilian Pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius; also known as Aroeira or Florida Holly) is a sprawling shrub or small tree 7-10 m tall, native to subtropical and tropical South America, in southeastern Brazil, northern Argentina and Paraguay. ... Binomial name Schinus molle Raddi Peruvian Pepper (Schinus molle, also known as California pepper tree, molle, pepper tree, pepperina, Peruvian mastictree and Peruvian peppertree) is a tree or shrub that grows to between 5 and 18 m tall. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Punica granatum L. The Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5–8 m tall. ... A wild field of poppies, West Azarbaijan Province, Iran A poppy is any of a number of showy flowers, born one per stem, belonging to the poppy family. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Binomial name Smilax regelii Killip & Morton Sarsaparilla (Smilax regelii and other closely related species of Smilax) is a vine that bears roots with many useful properties. ... This article is about the Sassafras tree. ... Binomial name Sesamum indicum L. Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum. ... Sichuan pepper (or Szechuan pepper) is the outer pod of the tiny fruit of a number of species in the genus Zanthoxylum (most commonly Zanthoxylum piperitum, Zanthoxylum simulans, and Zanthoxylum sancho), widely grown and consumed in Asia as a spice. ... Binomial name Illicium verum Hook. ... Species About 250 species; see text Rhus is a genus approximately 250 species of woody shrubs and small trees in the family Anacardiaceae. ... Species (not a complete list) Tasmannia is a genus of woody, evergreen flowering plants of the family Winteraceae. ... Binomial name Tamarindus indica L. This article refers to the tree – for other uses see Tamarindo (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Curcuma longa Linnaeus Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also known as tumeric) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cooking. ... Binomial name Wasabia japonica Matsum. ... Binomial name Curcuma zedoaria (Christm. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cassia - LoveToKnow 1911 (279 words)
The properties of cassia bark depend on the presence of a volatile oil - the oil of cassia, which is imported in a fairly pure state as an article of commerce from Canton.
Cassia Buds, which have a pleasing cinnamon flavour, are believed to be the immature fruits of the tree which yields Chinese cinnamon.
Cassia pulp, used as a laxative, is obtained from the pods of Cassia fistula, or pudding pipe tree, a native of Africa which is cultivated in both the East and West Indies.
Cassia (623 words)
Cassia bark is darker, thicker and coarser, and the corky outer bark is often left on.
Where cinnamon and cassia are differentiated, cinnamon is used for sweet dishes, or ones requiring a subtle flavour, and cassia for strong, spicy, main dishes.
Cassia is often used in stewed fruits, especially apples and with mixed spices for pudding spice, pastry spice and mulling spices.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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