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Encyclopedia > Cassandra
Ajax abducts Cassandra on an Attic black-figure kylix, ca. 550 BCE

In Greek mythology, Cassandra (Greek: Κασσάνδρα "she who entangles men"[1]) (also known as Alexandra) was a daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy. Her beauty caused Apollo to grant her the gift of prophecy (or, more correctly, prescience). However, when she did not return his love, Apollo placed a curse on her so that no one would ever believe her predictions. Look up Cassandra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 469 pixelsFull resolution (2648 × 1552 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 469 pixelsFull resolution (2648 × 1552 pixels, file size: 3. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Kylix may mean: Kylix (drinking cup), a type of drinking cup used in ancient Greece Kylix programming tool This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... Prescience is the ability to predict the future through vision. ...

Contents

History

"Ajax and Cassandra" by Solomon Joseph Solomon, 1886.
"Ajax and Cassandra" by Solomon Joseph Solomon, 1886.

In an alternative version, she spent a night at Apollo's temple with her twin brother Helenus, at which time the temple snakes licked her ears clean so that she was able to hear the future. This is a recurring theme in Greek mythology, though sometimes it brings an ability to understand the language of animals rather than an ability to know the future.[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 293 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (751 × 1534 pixel, file size: 333 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 293 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (751 × 1534 pixel, file size: 333 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Solomon Joseph Solomon (September 16, 1860, London - July 27, 1927, Birchington) was a British pre-Rafaelite painter, of no relation to Simeon Solomon or his siblings Abraham and Rebecca. ... Helenus was a Trojan soldier in the Trojan War. ...


Apollo loved Cassandra and when she did not return his love, he cursed her so that her gift would become a source of endless pain and frustration. In some versions of the myth, this is symbolized by the god spitting into her mouth; in other Greek versions, this act was sufficient to remove the gift so recently given by Apollo, but Cassandra's case varies. From the play Agamemnon, it appears that she made a promise to Apollo to become his consort, but broke it, thus incurring his wrath. The Eumenides redirects here. ...


Telephus, the son of Heracles, loved Cassandra but she scorned him and instead helped him seduce her sister Laodice. A Greek mythological figure, Telephus referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, the name Laodice referred to different people but most importantly the wife of Telephus and the Queen of Mysia. ...


While Cassandra foresaw the destruction of Troy (she warned the Trojans about the Trojan Horse, the death of Agamemnon, and her own demise), she was unable to do anything to forestall these tragedies. Her family believed she was mad, and according to some versions, kept her locked up. In versions where she was incarcerated, this was typically portrayed as driving her truly insane, although in versions where she was not, she is usually viewed as remaining simply misunderstood. For other uses, see Trojan Horse (disambiguation). ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ...


Coroebus and Othronus came to the aid of Troy out of love for Cassandra. Cassandra was also the first to see the body of her brother Hector being brought back to the city. In Greek mythology, Coroebus (Greek: Κόροιβος) was the son of King Mygdon of Phrygia. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ...


After the Trojan War, she sought shelter in the temple of Athena, where she was raped by Ajax the Lesser. Cassandra was then taken as a concubine by King Agamemnon of Mycenae. Unbeknownst to Agamemnon, while he was away at war, his wife, Clytemnestra, had begun an affair with Aegisthus. Clytemnestra and Aegisthus then murdered both Agamemnon and Cassandra. Some sources mention that Cassandra and Agamemnon had twin boys, Teledamus and Pelops, both of whom were killed by Aegisthus. The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Ajax (Greek: Αἴας), a Greek hero, son of Oïleus the king of Locris, called the lesser or Locrian Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax, son of Telamon. ... A swampy marsh area ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... Clytemnestra trying to awake the Erinyes while her son is being purified by Apollo, Apulian red-figure krater, 480–470 BC, Louvre (Cp 710) After the murder (1882 painting) Clytemnestra (or Clytaemestra) ‘‘(Eng. ... In Greek mythology, Aegisthus (goat strength, also transliterated as Aegisthos or Aigísthos) was the son of Thyestes and his daughter, Pelopia. ...


Homer. Iliad XXIV, 697-706; Homer. Odyssey XI, 405-434; Aeschylus. Agamemnon; Euripides. Trojan Women; Euripides. Electra; Apollodorus. Bibliotheke III, xii, 5; Apollodorus. Epitome V, 17-22; VI, 23; Virgil. Aeneid II, 246- This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... A statue of Euripides. ... The Trojan Women (in Greek, Troiades) is a tragedy by the Greek playwright Euripides. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon In Greek mythology, Electra was daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... An epitome (Greek epitemnein—to cut short) is a summary or miniature form, also used as a synonym for embodiment. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story...


Modern adaptations

Painting by Evelyn De Morgan.

A modern psychological perspective on Cassandra is presented by Eric Shanower in Age of Bronze: Sacrifice. In this version, Cassandra, as a child, is molested by a man pretending to be a god. His warning "No one will believe you!" is one often spoken by abusers to their child victims. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (336x700, 78 KB) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:de. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (336x700, 78 KB) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:de. ... Evelyn de Morgan (1855-1919) was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter. ... Age of Bronze issue 12 cover art Eric James Shanower (b. ... Age of Bronze is a comic book series by writer/artist Eric Shanower which began publication by Image Comics in the late 1990s. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse that involves crimes in most countries. ...


A similar situation occurred in Lindsay Clarke's novel The Return from Troy (presented as a reawakened memory), where a priest of Apollo forced himself upon Cassandra and was stopped only when she spat in his mouth. When the priest used his benevolent reputation to convince Priam that he was innocent of her wild claims, Cassandra subsequently went insane. Lindsay Clarke (born 1939, Halifax, West Yorkshire) is a British novelist. ...


The myth of Cassandra is also retold by German author Christa Wolf in Kassandra. She retells the story from the point of view of Cassandra at the moment of her death and uses the myth as an allegory for both the unheard voice of the woman writer and the oppression and strict censorship laws of East Germany. Christa Wolf (born March 18, 1929 in Landsberg an der Warthe, Germany (currently Gorzów Wielkopolski, Poland) as Christa Ihlenfeld) is one of the best-known writers to emerge from the former East Germany. ...


Author William Faulkner, in his novel Absalom, Absalom!, writes of Rosa Coldfield, a principal character in the Sutpen Dynasty/Tragedy, and how her "childhood ... consisted of a Cassandra-like listening beyond closed doors", alluding to both mythological concerns that (1) Cassandra was locked away, or behind closed doors (as with Rosa's youth), and (2) that Cassandra's prophecies were true, yet fated to be ignored (as with Rosa's premonitions about Thomas Sutpen and his desire to forge a dynasty). William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... Absalom, Absalom! is a Southern Gothic novel by William Faulkner, published in 1936. ...


The author Marion Zimmer Bradley wrote a historical novel called, Firebrand, which presents a story from Cassandra's point of view. Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series, often with a feminist outlook. ...


Marcus Sedgwick's novel The Foreshadowing features a protagonist named Alexandra who has the gift of foresight, though she sees mainly others' pain and death. A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ...


In Clemence McLearn's Inside the Walls of Troy, Cassandra had a strong friendship with Queen Helen of Sparta when she came to Troy with Prince Paris. Cassandra essentially hated Helen but gave in to her unbearable joy and happiness and became Helen's "confidante". At the end of the story instead of Cassandra being raped and taken as Agamemnon's "battle prize", she simply joined her two sisters, Polyxena and Laodice at the temple of Athena. The rest of her story is left untold.


Modern usage

Michelangelo's depiction of the Delphic Sibyl, sometimes identified with Cassandra, and therefore with a specific allusion of the author to classical antiquity. (Fresco at the Sistine Chapel).
Michelangelo's depiction of the Delphic Sibyl, sometimes identified with Cassandra, and therefore with a specific allusion of the author to classical antiquity. (Fresco at the Sistine Chapel).

In more modern literature, Cassandra has often served as a model for tragedy and Romance, and has given rise to the archetypical character of someone whose prophetic insight is obscured by insanity, turning their revelations into riddles or disjointed statements that are not fully comprehended until after the fact. Notable examples are the character of River Tam from the science fiction TV series Firefly and the science fiction short story "Cassandra" by C. J. Cherryh. Download high resolution version (942x960, 147 KB)Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo Image comments: The Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo. ... Download high resolution version (942x960, 147 KB)Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo Image comments: The Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos rendering of the Delphic Sibyl The Delphic Sibyl was a legendary figure who made prophecies in the sacred precinct of Apollo at Delphi, located on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... God creates Adam by Michelangelo. ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ... River Tam is a fictional character played by Summer Glau. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ... Cassandra is a science fiction short story written by American science fiction and fantasy author C. J. Cherryh. ... C. J. Cherryh (born September 1, 1942) is the slightly modified working name of United States science fiction and fantasy author Carolyn Janice Cherry, the sister of artist David A. Cherry. ...


"Cassandra" is the title of an episode of the British sci-fi comedy series Red Dwarf. In it a futuristic computer, Cassandra, is discovered to have the ability to predict the future. She foretells a number of conversations and events which each come true, save for one scene where one character kills another in a jealous rage. It emerges this is a lie to try to punish the killer for his responsibility for his victim's later death, which Cassandra correctly predicts he accidentally causes. The story in the episode deviates somewhat from myth in that she is not universally disbelieved. The theme of the futility of trying to change the future is explored at several points in the episode. Cassandra was the fourth episode to air in the eighth series of Red Dwarf. ... This article is about the type of star. ...

Syrigx's demo EP cover "The Cassandra Syndrome"
Syrigx's demo EP cover "The Cassandra Syndrome"

In "Help," an episode of the television show Buffy the Vampire Slayer, a young girl named Cassandra "Cassie" Newton foresees her own death despite the attempts of the show's protagonist, Buffy Summers, to prevent it. She also foresees what will happen in Buffy's final battle with one of the show's antagonists, The First, and its army. Image File history File links SyrgixTheCassandraSyndromeCover. ... Image File history File links SyrgixTheCassandraSyndromeCover. ... List of Buffy the Vampire Slayer episodes Help is the fourth episode of the seventh and final season of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Buffy Anne Summers is the eponymous fictional character in the film Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the television program of the same name and its numerous spin-offs, such as novels, comic books, and video games. ... The First Evil is a fictional villain created by Joss Whedon for the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ...


In the episode "Hourglass" of the sci-fi series Smallville, the plot revolves around an old people's home where one of the residents who was blinded on the day of the meteor shower called Cassandra can apparently see the future. She also makes reference to the story of Troy when mentioning to Lex Luthor, who had brought her a bunch of flowers, that "It was the Greeks who also brought gifts." The resident also sees Lex's future and his ascendancy to the US Presidency. Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ...


The Cassandra syndrome is a fictional condition used to describe someone who believes that he or she can see the future but cannot do anything about it. Fictional character Dr. Kathryn Railly explores this syndrome and those who suffer from it in the film Twelve Monkeys. The Cassandra Syndrome is a term applied to predictions of doom about the future that are not believed, but upon later reflection turn out to be correct. ... Twelve Monkeys is a 1995 science fiction film written by David and Janet Peoples and directed by Terry Gilliam. ...


In Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson's Scream 2, Sidney Prescott, the main character played by Neve Campbell, is a mirror of Cassandra in the sense that she is cursed by forever being susceptible to murder, conspiracy, and being alone, and actually appears in a play within the film titled "Cassandra", where she also plays the lead. During the rest of the trilogy, she has made clear that if it weren't for her, the plot of the movies, and for Sidney, the events in her life, would have never happened, and that continually surviving attacks has made the ones closest to her even more vulnerable to the characteristics that plague her life. Sidney is also seen speaking the line, "You know, I saw it all coming. I knew it wasn't over", referring to the murders in Scream 2. This is a prophecy revealed, a play on the curse that plagued Cassandra. Wesley Earl Craven (born August 2, 1939 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American film director and writer best known as the creator of many horror films, including the famed Nightmare on Elm Street series featuring the redoubtable Freddy Krueger character. ... Scream 2 is a 1997 film, the second part of the Scream trilogy. ... Neve Adrianne Campbell (born October 3, 1973) is a Canadian actress. ...


Norwegian gothic metal pioneers Theatre of Tragedy wrote a song about Cassandra on their 1998 album Aegis. The band Theatre of Tragedy Theatre of Tragedy is a Norwegian band from Stavanger, originally assembled in 1993 and best known for their earlier albums, which provided a great deal of influence to the gothic metal genre. ... For other uses, see Aegis (disambiguation). ...


German power metal group Blind Guardian featured two songs about Cassandra and the Trojan War on their 2002 album A Night at the Opera, Under the Ice and And Then There Was Silence, the latter of which was the title track of the 2001 "warmup" single for the album. This article is about the sub-genre of heavy metal music. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Not to be confused with A Night at the Opera (Queen album). ...


The musical group ABBA released a song titled "Cassandra" as a B-side to the single, The Day Before You Came at the very end of their time as an active group. Anni-Frid Lyngstad has the lead vocal and sings about Cassandra's departure from a town after some unnamed disasters have occurred and her own regret about not believing Cassandra's warnings. The song has been included in subsequent compilation CD releases. Abba redirects here. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... The Day Before You Came is a song recorded and released by Swedish pop group ABBA. It was originally released as the first new song off the double compilation album The Singles: The First Ten Years, released in November 1982. ... Her Serene Highness Princess Anni-Frid Reuss, Countess of Plauen (born Anni-Frid Synni Lyngstad on November 15, 1945 in Bjørkåsen in Ballangen, Norway), is a singer, best known as Frida Lyngstad, one of the four members of Swedish pop group ABBA.[1] // Anni- Frid had a very...


In Woody Allen's Mighty Aphrodite, which features several apperances by classical Greek figures, Cassandra appears warning Allen's character not to move to the countryside. As usual, she is not listened to. She makes a later apperances, delivering the following line: "I see disaster. I see catastrophe. Worse, I see lawyers!" She is played by Danielle Ferland. Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Mighty Aphrodite is a 1995 comedy film, written by, directed by and starring Woody Allen. ... Danielle Ferland (b. ...


The Melbourne band Something for Kate released the song 'Cassandra Walks The Plank" as a B-side on their single "California" from 2007. Vocalist and guitarist Paul Dempsey later describes the song as a 'Straightforward angry rant' about warning signs in the modern world on their iTunes Originals release. The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Paul Dempsey (born 1976 in Melbourne) is the lead singer of Australian rock group Something for Kate. ...


David Murray Black also released a song called "Prophet of Doom" in his CD Sacred Ground about Cassandra.


The Crüxshadows sing a song about Cassandra on their 2003 album Ethernaut on their song "Cassandra". The Crüxshadows (Pronounced as IPA: )[3] is an independent music group from Florida. ... Ethernaut is a 2003 album by The Crüxshadows. ...


The Motorcycle Boy's girl Cassandra in Rumble Fish says that she is not hooked on drugs, but Rusty-James doesn't believe her. Rumble Fish is a 1983 film directed, produced and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola, based on the novel by S.E. Hinton (ISBN 0-440-97534-4) who co-wrote the screenplay as well. ...


The show Hercules: The Animated Series depict Cassandra as a rather goth teenager who has visions of awful things and is loved by Icarus. Icarus and Daedalus by Frederic Leighton The Fall of Icarus (detail), by Pieter Brueghel, 1558: Icarus is seen flailing in the water, but is ignored Daedalus launches Icarus off the ledge. ...


American progressive metal group Dream Theater refer to Cassandra fleetingly in a song called "Voices" in which they mock the (false) prophetic message of modern day religion. Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ...


The character Cassandra Kirschbaum in the 2004 MGM film Saved! is likely named after the Greek Cassandra. Cassandra Kirschbaum is the only Jewish student at the Evangelical Christian high school that serves as the film's setting. Her character fills the role of "truth-teller" at the school, exposing other characters' hypocrisy. Cassandra Kirschbaum also appears in the Off-Broadway musical based on the film. Saved! is a 2004 teen comedy film involving elements of religious satire written by Brian Dannelly and Michael Urban, and directed by Dannelly. ...


Dr. Bocker, in John Wyndham's The Kraken Wakes mentions Cassandra fleetingly in "Phase 2," referring to the aspect of one who predicts the future but goes unheeded, with dire consequences. The quote can be found on page 107 of the 1973 publishing by Penguin Books.[3] John Wyndham (July 10, 1903 – March 11, 1969) was the pen name used by the often post-apocalyptic British science fiction writer John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


References

  1. ^ This is Robert Graves' etymology.
  2. ^ Compare Melampus; Athena cleaned the ears of Tiresias
  3. ^ Wyndham, John (1973). The Kraken Wakes (in English). London: Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-140-01075-6. 

Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... In Greek Mythology, Melampus, or Melampous, was a soothsayer and healer who could talk to animals. ... Everes redirects here. ... John Wyndham (July 10, 1903 – March 11, 1969) was the pen name used by the often post-apocalyptic British science fiction writer John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ...

Further reading

  • Clarke, Lindsay. The Return from Troy. HarperCollins (2005). ISBN 0-00-715027-X.
  • Marion Zimmer Bradley. The Firebrand. ISBN 0-451-45924-5
  • Patacsil, Par. Cassandra. In The Likhaan Book of Plays 1997-2003. Villanueva and Nadera, eds. University of the Philippines Press (2006). ISBN 971-542-507-0

See also

  • Cassandra (metaphor)
  • Apollo
  • Apollo archetype

For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ...

Primary sources

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cassandra
  • Virgil, Aeneid II.246-247, 341-346, 403-408
  • [http://www.theoi.com Theoi Project: Cassandra, classical sources in English translation
This is a list of the characters that appear in the Iliad by Homer. ... In Greek mythology, Acamas (unwearying) was the son of Phaedra and Theseus. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Actor was a son of King Deion, of Phocis and Diomede, the daughter of Xuthus. ... In Greek mythology, Adrastus, or Adrastos (he who stands his ground, son of Talaus) was one of the three kings at Argos, along with Iphis and Amphiaraus, who was married to Adrastus sister Eriphyle. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... Agapenor: Leader of the Arkadians Reference Homer, The Iliad, translated by Richmond Lattimore, 1951 Categories: ... Ajax or Aias (Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and disciple of Salamis. ... Ajax (Greek: Αἴας), a Greek hero, son of Oïleus the king of Locris, called the lesser or Locrian Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax, son of Telamon. ... In Greek mythology, Antilochus (also transliterated as Antílokhos) was the son of Nestor, king of Pylos. ... In Greek mythology, two people share the name Ascalaphus. ... In Greek mythology, Automedon, son of Diores, was Achilles charioteer. ... In Greek mythology, Balius (Dappled) and Xanthus (Blonde) were two immortal horses, the offspring of the harpy Podarge and the West wind, Zephyros (); following another tradition, their father was Zeus. ... In Greek mythology, Bias was a brother of Melampus who received one third of Argos (see Melampus for more information). ... In Greek mythology, BrisÄ“is (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ... DiomÄ“dÄ“s or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology Elephenor was the son of Chalcodon and king of the Abantes of Euboea. ... In Greek mythology, Euryalus referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, Eurybates was the herald for the Greek armies during the Trojan War. ... As written in Homers The Iliad, Hecamede, daughter of Arsinous, was captured from the isle of Tenedos and given as captive to King Nestor. ... In Greek mythology, Idomeneus was a Cretan warrior, grandson of Minos. ... In Greek mythology, Machaon was a son of Asclepius. ... In Greek mythology, Mecisteus was the son of Talaus and and Lysimache. ... In Greek mythology, there were two people called Medôn. ... In Greek mythology, Mégês Phyleïdês was a son of Phyleus. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... Menestheus, the son of Peteus, son of Orneus, son of Erechtheus, was a legendary King of Athens during the Trojan War. ... Meriones was a son of Molus and Melphis. ... In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia (Greek: Νέστωρ) was the son of Neleus and Chloris, and the King of Pylos. ... In Greek mythology, Nireus was the name of several individuals: Nireus was a son of Poseidon and Canace. ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Phoenix (mythology). ... In Greek mythology, Podarces was a son of Iphicles. ... In Greek mythology, Promachus (who leads in battle) referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, Protesilaus was the son of Iphicles and the leader of the Phylaceans. ... In the Iliad, he was the son of Iphitus and brother of Epistrophus. ... In Greek mythology, Stentor (Στεντωρ) was a herald of the Greek forces during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Sthenelus refers to four different people. ... In Greek Mythology and epic poetry, Talthybius was a herald in the Greek camp during the Trojan War and a friend of Agamemnons. ... In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris from Greek Τεύκρος, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his second wife Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Thersites, son of Agrius, was a rank-and-file soldier of the Greek army during the Trojan War. ... Thoas, son of Andraimon, was one of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology Thrasymedes was a participent in the Trojan War. ... Tlepolemus, or Tlêpólemos, in Greek mythology was the son of Heracles by Astyocheia, daughter of the King of Ephyra. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Greek mythology, Aesepus was the son of the naiad Abarbarea and Bucolion. ... In history and Greek mythology, Agenor (which means very manly) was a king of Tyre. ... In Greek mythology, Alcathous was a son of Pelops and Hippodamia. ... In Greek mythology, Amphimachus is the name of seven men. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... Andromache grieves the loss of Hector In Greek mythology, Andromache was the wife of Hector and daughter of Eetion, sister to Podes. ... Antenor was one of the Elders of Troy at the time of the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Ant phat s was King of the Laestrogynes. ... In Greek mythology, one of these people: In the Iliad, Antiphus, or Ántiphos, a Trojan ally, the son of Talaemenes and a nymph. ... In the Iliad Archelochus was a son of Antenor and along with his brother Acamas and Aeneas, shared the command of the Dardanians fighting on the side of the Trojans. ... In Greek mythology, Asius refers to two people who fought during the Trojan War: Asius (Asios) son of Hyrtacus was the leader of the Trojan allies that hailed from, on, or near the Dardanelles (Iliad, 2. ... In the Iliad Asteropaios (Latin: Asteropaeus) was the leader of the Trojan-allied Paionians along with fellow warrior Pyraechmes. ... In Greek mythology, Astyanax (Greek Ἀστυάναξ, prince of the city) was the son of Hector and Andromache. ... Axylus is mentioned in Book VI of Homers Iliad. ... In Greek mythology, Kalchas Thestórides (son of Thestor), or Calchas (brazen) for short, a loyal Argive, was a powerful seer, a gift of Apollo: as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp (Iliad i, E.V. Rieu translation) Calchas prophesized that in order to gain a favourable... Calesius was the attendant and charioteer of Axylus. ... In Greek mythology, Chryseis (Greek: Χρύσηίς, Khrysēís) was a Trojan woman, the daughter of Chryses. ... Chryses attempting to ransom his daughter Chryseis from Agamemnon, Apulian red-figure crater by the Athens 1714 Painter, ca. ... Clytius is the name of many people in Greek mythology: A son of Laomedon in Homers Iliad, book 10. ... Dares Phrygius, according to Homer (Iliad, v. ... In Greek mythology, Deiphobus was a son of Priam and Hecuba. ... In Greek mythology, Dolon (In Ancient Greek: Δόλων) was the son of Eumedes. ... Epeus redirects here. ... In the Iliad, he was the son of Iphitus and brother of Schedius. ... In Greek mythology, Eteóneus was King Menelaus of Spartas weapon-carrier during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Euneus was a son of Jason and Queen Hypsipyle of Lemnos; he later became King of Lemnos. ... In Greek mythology, Euphemus was the son of Europa and Poseidon. ... Euphorbus, the son of Panthous, was a Trojan hero during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Eurypylus (Greek: Εὐρύπυλος) was the name of several different people. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ... The Halizones (Halizonians) are an obscure people that appear in Homers Iliad as allies of Troy during the Trojan War. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... Helenus was a Trojan soldier in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Kebriones was the son of King Priam of Troy and a slave. ... Lykomedes was on the side of the Argives in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, there were three people named Melanippus: Son of Agrius, killed by Heracles Son of Perigune and Theseus Son of Astacus, defended Thebes in the Seven Against Thebes. ... In Greek mythology, Mentor (sometimes Mentes) was the son of Alcumus and, in his old age, a friend of Odysseus. ... Mydon was one of the defenders of Troy in Homers Iliad. ... In Greek mythology, King Mygdon of Phrygia was a son of Acmon and father of Coroebus by his wife Anaximene. ... In Greek Mythology, Othryoneus was a suitor of Princess Cassandra of Troy. ... In Homers Iliad, Pandarus or Pandaros is the son of Lycaon and a famous archer. ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Pedasus was the son of the naiad Abarbarea and Bucolion. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Podalirius was a son of Asclepius. ... In Greek mythology, Polites referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, Poludamas was a lieutenant and friend of Hector during the Trojan War. ... Polybus was a famous physician. ... In Greek mythology, Polydorus referred to three different people. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Pyraechmes was, along with Asteropaeus, a leader of the Paeonians in the Trojan War. ... Rhesus (Rhêsos) was a Thracian king who fought on the side of Trojans in the Iliad. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... This article is about the mythological Theano. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cassandra, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (1543 words)
Following the advice of Cassandra's half brother Aesacus 1, who had learned the art of interpreting dreams from his maternal grandfather Merops 1, they exposed the child, since he declared that Paris was to become the ruin of the country.
It was then that Cassandra declared that Paris was her brother, and Priam 1 then acknowledged him as his son, receiving him into his palace.
Aerope 1, Agamemnon, Agrianome, Ajax 2, Atlas, Atreus, Cassandra, Dardanus 1, Electra 3, Erichthonius 1, Hecabe 1, Hodoedocus, Ilus 2, Laomedon 1, Oileus 1, Pelops 1, Pelops 2, Perseon, Pleione, Pluto 3, Priam 1, Tantalus 1, Teledamus 1, Tros 1, Zeus.
Cassandra (162 words)
Cassandra was the most beautiful of the daughters of Priam and Hecuba, the king and queen of Troy.
At the end of the Trojan War, Cassandra foresaw the danger posed by the Trojan horse; the people of Troy ignored her warnings and the Greek soldiers hiding inside the horse were able to capture the city.
During the sack of Troy, Cassandra was raped by the Locrian (or "lesser") Ajax, and was then given as a war prize to Agamemnon.
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