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Encyclopedia > Cassander
     Kingdom of Cassander Other diadochi      Kingdom of Seleucus      Kingdom of Lysimachus      Kingdom of Ptolemy      Epirus Other      Carthage      Rome      Greek colonies

Cassander (in Greek, ΚάσσανδροςKassandros, ca. 350297 BC), king of Macedon (305297 BC), was eldest son of Antipater, and founder of the short-lived Antipatrid dynasty. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x961, 2700 KB) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:de. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x961, 2700 KB) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:de. ... In general Diadochi (in Greek Διάδοχοι, transcripted Diadochoi) means successors, such that the neoplatonic refounders of Platos Academy in Late Antiquity referred to themselves as diadochi (of Plato). ... Seleucus was the name of several Macedonian kings of the Seleucid dynasty ruling in the area of Syria. ... Lysimachus (c. ... Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: , Ptolemaios Soter, i. ... Epirus (Greek Ήπειρος, Ípiros) is a geographical and historical region of the Balkan peninsula in south-eastern Europe. ... Carthage (Greek: , from the Phoenician meaning new town, Arabic: , Latin: ) refers both to an ancient city in North Africa located in modern day Tunis and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Colonies in antiquity were city-states founded from a mother-city, not from a territory-at-large. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 355 BC 354 BC 353 BC 352 BC 351 BC - 350 BC - 349 BC 348 BC 347... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294... Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (from Greek ; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordering the kingdom of Epirus on the west and the region of Thrace to the east[1... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 310 BC 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306 BC 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294... Antipater (Greek: Αντίπατρος Antipatros; c. ... The Antipatrid dynasty was a Macedonian dynasty founded by Cassander (declared himself King of Macedonia in 302 BC), the son of Antipater. ...


He first appears at the court of Alexander the Great at Babylon, where he defended his father Antipater, regent of Macedon, against the accusations of his enemies (principally the Queen Mother, Olympias). Having been passed over by his father in favour of Polyperchon as his successor in the regency of Macedonia, Cassander allied himself with Ptolemy Soter and Antigonus and declared war against the regent. Most of the Greek states went over to him, including Athens. He further effected an alliance with Eurydice, the ambitious wife of King Philip Arrhidaeus of Macedon. Alexander the Great (Greek: ,[1] Megas Alexandros; July 356 BC–June 11, 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, king of Macedon (336–323 BC), was one of the most successful military commanders in history. ... Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 80km south of Baghdad. ... Olympias (Greek: Ολυμπιάς) (c. ... Polyperchon (394 - 303 BC) was a Macedonian general who served under Philip II and Alexander the Great, accompanying Alexander throughout his long journeys. ... Ptolemy I Soter (367 BC–283 BC) was the ruler of Egypt (323 BC - 283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. ... Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmos (the One-eyed, so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... Philip III (Arrhidaeus) (c. ...


Both Eurydice and Phillip III, however, together with Cassander's brother Nicanor, were soon slain by Olympias. Cassander at once marched against Olympias and, having forced her to surrender in Pydna, put her to death (316 BC). In 310 BC/309 BC, he also poisoned Roxana and the nominal King Alexander IV of Macedon, respectively the wife and son of Alexander the Great in 323 BC. He also bribed Polyperchon to poison Alexander's illegitimate son Heracles. Nicanor was the name of several ancient Greeks: Nicanor of Macedon, father of Balacrus, who lived under Philip II of Macedonia Nicanor (Egyptian general), a trusted general of Ptolemy I Soter, king of Egypt Nicanor (general), a key general of Cassander Nicanor of Macedonia, brother of Philotas and comander of... Pydna is also an rocket station of the American Army in Germany, see Pydna (rocket station) Pydna (in Greek: Πύδνα, older transliteration: Púdna), also Pidna was a Greek city in Ancient Macedonia, the most important in Pieria. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 321 BC 320 BC 319 BC 318 BC 317 BC 316 BC 315 BC 314 BC 313... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC Years: 315 BC 314 BC 313 BC 312 BC 311 BC _ 310 BC _ 309 BC... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 314 BC 313 BC 312 BC 311 BC 310 BC 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306... Roxana (Bactrian: Roshanak; literally little shiny star or light), was a Bactrian noble and a wife of Alexander the Great. ... Alexander IV Aegus (in Greek Aλέξανδρος Aιγός; 323–309 BC) was the son of Alexander the Great and Roxana, a princess of Bactria. ... On his way from Ecbatana to Babylon, Alexander the Great fights and crushes the Cossaeans. ... Heracles was the name of an illegitimate son born to Alexander the Great by his mistress Barsine, daughter of Satrap Artabazus of Phrygia in 327 BC. The first son to be born to Alexander, he was named after the mythical hero from whom the royal family of Macedonia claimed its...


He had already connected himself with the royal family by marriage with Thessalonica, half-sister of Alexander the Great, and, having formed an alliance with Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus against Antigonus, he became, on the defeat and death of Antigonus around 301 BC, undisputed sovereign of Macedonia. He died of dropsy in 297 BC. According to Pausanias: "He was filled with dropsy, and from it came worms while he was still alive. Philip, his eldest son, soon after coming to the throne took a wasting disease and died. Antipatros, the next son, murdered his mother Thessalonica, daughter of Philip and Nikasepolis, accusing her of being too fond of Alexandros, the youngest son." Alexandros avenged his mother by killing his brother Antipatros, but was killed in turn by Demetrios the Besieger of Cities, son of Antigonus. Thus the entire family of Cassander expired. Thessalonica or Thessalonike (in Greek Θεσσαλονικη), a Macedonian princess, was a daughter of king Philip II of Macedon, by his Thessalian[1] wife or concubine, Nicesipolis, (also spelled Nikasipolis), of Pherae. ... Silver coin of Seleucus. ... Lysimachus (c. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 306 BC 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC Battle of Ipsus: King... Edema (BE: oedema, formerly known as dropsy) is swelling of any organ or tissue due to accumulation of excess fluid. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...


Cassander was a man of literary taste but violent and ambitious. He restored Thebes after its destruction by Alexander the Great, transformed Therma into Thessalonica, and built the new city of Cassandreia upon the ruins of Potidaea. Thebes (in Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva, Katharevousa: — ThÄ“bai or Thíve) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ... Cassandreia (Greek: Κασσάνδρεια Kassandreia, modern transliteration: Kassandria) or Casssandrea was one of the most important cities in Ancient Macedonia founded by and named after Cassander in 316 BC located near the Ancient Greek city of Potidaea. ... Potidaea (Greek: Ποτίδαια Potidaia, modern transliteration: Potidea) was a colony founded by the Corinthians around 600 BC in the narrowest point in Pallene (now Kassandria) in the western point of Chalkidiki (Chalcidice) in what was known as Thrace, Potidaea was maintaining trade with Macedonia. ...


References

  • Franca Landucci Gattinoni: L'arte del potere. Vita e opere di Cassandro di Macedonia. Stuttgart 2003. ISBN 3-515-08381-2

Diodorus Siculus (c. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Plutarch in Greek Plutarchs Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans is a series of biographies of famous men, arranged in tandem to illuminate their common moral virtues or failings. ... Demetrius I (337-283 BC), surnamed Poliorcetes (Besieger), son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus and Stratonice, was a king of Macedon (294 - 288 BC). ... Phocion (c402 - c318 BC), Athenian statesman and general, was born the son of a small manufacturer. ...

Cassander as fictional character

Mary Renault refers to Cassander by his Greek name, Kassandros, and depicts him as a monster of evil, in particular in Funeral Games, in which novel he is the villain. Mary Renault (1905–1983) was an English novelist whose works are still popular with devotees of the historical novel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


External link

Preceded by
Polyperchon
Regent of Macedon
317–306 BC
Succeeded by
became king
Preceded by:
Alexander IV
King of Macedon
306–297 BC
Succeeded by:
Philip IV

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cassander - King of Macedonia (213 words)
In 318 following the defeat of Polyperchon's fleet by that of Antigonus off the Bosphorus, Cassander returned to Macedonia, where he persuaded King Philip III to depose Polyperchon.
In mainland Greece Cassander continued the policy pursued by his father Antipater of treating the city-states as subjects rather than allies, in contrast to the policy, of Antigonus and Demetrius.
He had married the sister of Alexander the Great Thessalonica, and in her honor founded the Thessalonica, which centuries later turned into the greatest Macedonian city.
Cassander of Macedonia - LoveToKnow 1911 (259 words)
Having been passed over by his father in favour of Polyperchon as his successor in the regency of Macedonia, Cassander allied himself with Ptolemy Soter and Antigonus, and declared war against the regent.
Both she and her husband, however, together with Cassander's brother, Nicanor, were soon after slain by Olympias.
Cassander at once marched against Olympias, and, having forced her to surrender in Pydna, put her to death (316).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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