FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cass Gilbert
The Woolworth Building in New York City was the world's tallest building when it was built in 1913.

Cass Gilbert (November 29, 1859May 17, 1934) was a pioneering American architect.[1] An early proponent of skyscrapers in works like the Woolworth Building, Gilbert was also responsible for numerous museums and libraries (Saint Louis Art Museum), state capitol buildings (the Minnesota and West Virginia State Capitols, for example) as well as public architectural icons like the United States Supreme Court building. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 2053 KB) Summary Woolworth Building in New York City was designed by Cass Gilbert and built in 1909. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 2053 KB) Summary Woolworth Building in New York City was designed by Cass Gilbert and built in 1909. ... The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest skyscraper by roof height on high rise. ... The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... The façade of the St. ... Minnesota State Capitol at Night The Minnesota State Capitol is located in Minnesotas capital city, Saint Paul, and houses the Minnesota Senate, Minnesota House of Representatives, the Office of the Attorney General and the Office of the Governor. ... The West Virginia State Capitol The West Virginia State Capitol is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of West Virginia. ... Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. The buildings facade underwent renovation during the summer of 2006. ...

Contents

Early life

Gilbert was born in Zanesville, Ohio, the middle of three sons, and was named after the statesman Lewis Cass, to whom he was distantly related.[1] Gilbert's father was a surveyor for what was then known as the United States Coast Survey. At the age of nine, Gilbert's family moved to St. Paul, Minnesota where he was raised by his mother after his father died. After attending preparatory school in nearby Minneapolis, Gilbert dropped out of Macalester College, before beginning his architectural career at age 17 by joining the Abraham M. Radcliffe office in St. Paul. In 1878 Gilbert enrolled in the architecture program at MIT.[2] Muskingum County Courthouse (Photo ©2004 Leslie K. Dellovade) Zanesville is a city in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... The National Geodetic Survey is the successor agency in the United States to the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. ... State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Macalester College (popularly known as Mac) is a privately supported, coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... Abraham M. Radcliffe (1827 - ) was an architect born in New York. ... “MIT” redirects here. ...


Professional career

Gilbert later worked for a time with the firm of McKim, Mead, and White before starting a practice in St. Paul with James Knox Taylor. He won a series of house and office-building commissions (the Endicott Building in St. Paul is still regarded as a gem, and many of his noteworthy houses still stand on St. Paul's Summit Avenue) in Minnesota before landing a career-breaking commission designing the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House in New York City (now home to the George Gustav Heye Center).[1] His public buildings in the Beaux Arts style reflect the optimistic American sense that the nation was the heir of Greek democracy, Roman law and Renaissance humanism.[3] McKim, Mead, and White was a prominent architectural firm in the eastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century. ... The central rotunda of the Alexander Hamilton Custom House The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House (originally U.S. Custom House) is a building in New York City, built 1902 - 1907 by the federal government to house the duty collection operations for the port of New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The George Gustav Heye Center is the branch in New York City of the National Museum of the American Indian, which is part of the Smithsonian Institution. ... Beaux Arts was an architectural style that was popular in the early twentieth century. ...


Historical impact

Gilbert is considered a skyscraper pioneer; when designing the Woolworth Building he moved into unproven ground — though he certainly was aware of the ground-breaking work done by Chicago architects on skyscrapers and once discussed merging firms with the legendary Daniel Burnham — and his technique of cladding a steel frame became the model for decades.[1] Modernists embraced his work: Alfred Stieglitz immortalized the Woolworth Building in a famous series of photographs and John Marin created several paintings of the same; even Frank Lloyd Wright praised the lines of the building, though he decried the ornamentation. For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Daniel H. Burnham. ... He was a loser. ... The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... John Marin (December 23, 1870 - October 2, 1953) was an early American modernist artist. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the worlds most prominent and influential architects. ...


Gilbert was one of the first celebrity architects in America, designing skyscrapers in New York City and Cincinnati, college campuses at Oberlin College and the University of Texas, state capitols in Minnesota and West Virginia, the support towers of the George Washington Bridge, various railroad stations (including the New Haven Union Station), and the United States Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.. His reputation declined among some professionals during the age of Modernism, but he was on the design committee that guided and eventually approved the modernist design of Manhattan's groundbreaking Rockefeller Center: when considering Gilbert's body of works as whole, it is more eclectic than many critics admit. Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... For the bridge in New York that crosses the Harlem River, see Washington Bridge. ... Union Station is the main railroad passenger terminal in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. The buildings facade underwent renovation during the summer of 2006. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ...


Notable works

US Supreme Court Building, Washington D.C., East Pediment, 1928–1935.
  • The Broadway-Chambers Building (277 Broadway), 1899–1900. Gilbert's first building in New York City.[4]
  • The Spalding Building, Portland, 1911. A 12-story early skyscraper based on the construction principles of a classical column.
  • Central Library, St. Louis, 1912. The main library for the city's public library system, in a severe classicizing style, has an oval central pavilion surrounded by four light courts. The outer facades of the free-standing building are of lightly rusticated Maine granite. The Olive Street front is disposed like a colossal arcade, with contrasting marble bas-relief panels. A projecting three-bay central block, like a pared-down triumphal arch, provides a monumental entrance. At the rear the Central Library faced a sunken garden. The interiors feature some light-transmitting glass floors. The ceiling of the Periodicals Room is modified from Michelangelo's ceiling in the Laurentian Library.[7][8]
  • Woolworth Building, New York City, 1913. A Gothic skyscraper clad in glazed terracotta panels, it was the tallest building in the world when built. Bas reliefs in the lobby depict Woolworth and Gilbert, Woolworth holding nickels and dimes.
  • Fountain in Ridgefield, Connecticut, at the intersection of Routes 35 and 33, 1914–16. This fountain was designed and donated to the town by Cass Gilbert, who lived there town for a period. In 2004, a drunk driver crashed into the fountain and completely destroyed it; a replica has since been completed.
  • US Embassy Building, Ottowa, Ontario, 1932.

Archives

Gilbert's drawings and correspondence are preserved at the New-York Historical Society, the Minnesota Historical Society and the Library of Congress. The New-York Historical Society is an American organization located in New York City and dedicated to the preservation of the citys history. ... The Minnesota Historical Society is a Minnesota instutution dedicated to preserving the history of the state. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d Christen, Barbara S.; Flanders, Steven (2001). Cass Gilbert, Life and Work: Architect of the Public Domain. W.W. Norton. ISBN 0393730654. 
  2. ^ Irish, Sharon (1999). Cass Gilbert, Architect. Monacelli. ISBN 1885254903. 
  3. ^ Blodgett, Geoffrey (1999). Cass Gilbert: The Early Years. Minnesota Historical Society Press. ISBN 0-87351-410-6. 
  4. ^ Broadway-Chambers Building. New York Architecture Images. Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  5. ^ National Trust Presents National Preservation Honor Award to 90 West Street in Lower Manhattan (2006-11-02). Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  6. ^ Cass Gilbert Plan. University of Minnesota Sesquicentennial History (2000-06-01). Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  7. ^ St. Louis Public Library. St. Louis Public Library Fact Sheer. Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  8. ^ Stocker EB (1985). "St. Louis Public Library". Journal of Library History 20 (3): 310–12. 
  9. ^ First Division Monument. National Park Service (2006-09-08). Retrieved on 2007-05-04.

Geoffrey Blodgett (1931-November 15, 2001) was Robert S. Danforth Professor of History at Oberlin College, located in Oberlin, Ohio. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

ArchINFORM is an online database for international architecture, originally emerging from records of interesting building projects from architecture students from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. ...

Architecture

Archival collections


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cass Gilbert Biography (904 words)
Cass Gilbert was born in Zanesville, Ohio, on November 29, 1859, the middle of three sons.
When Cass was nine, the family traveled for two weeks by boat down the Ohio River to the Mississippi to make their way to St. Paul, Minnesota.
Also, Gilbert married Julia Tappan Finch in 1887, the daughter of a wealthy attorney from Milwaukee, who brought to the marriage her connections and influence.
Cass Gilbert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (819 words)
Cass Gilbert (November 29, 1859 - May 17, 1934) was born in Zanesville, Ohio, the middle of three sons, and was named after the statesman Lewis Cass, to whom he was distantly related.
Local newspapers made a fuss when Gilbert sent to Georgia for marble, but the result, in which a hemispherical dome caps a high drum not unlike Saint Peter's over a range of buildings expressing the bicameral legislature, was so nobly handsome that West Virginia and Arkansas contracted for Gilbert capitols too.
Gilbert's drawings and correspondence are preserved at the New-York Historical Society, the Minnesota Historical Society and the Library of Congress.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m