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Encyclopedia > Casino Royale (2006 film)
Casino Royale

Casino Royale film poster
James Bond Daniel Craig
Also starring Eva Green
Mads Mikkelsen
Judi Dench
Jeffrey Wright
Directed by Martin Campbell
Produced by Barbara Broccoli
Michael G. Wilson
Novel/Story by Ian Fleming
Screenplay Neal Purvis
Robert Wade
Paul Haggis
Cinematography by Phil Meheux
Music by David Arnold
Main theme You Know My Name
Composer David Arnold
Chris Cornell
Performer Chris Cornell
Editing by Stuart Baird
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Columbia Pictures
Released Globally:
14 November 2006
United Kingdom:
17 November 2006
United States:
17 November 2006


Canada:
21 November 2006
Australia:
7 December 2006 Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (508x755, 63 KB) This image is of a movie poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie or the studio which produced the movie in question. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming in 1952. ... Daniel Wroughton Craig[1] (born 2 March 1968) is an English actor. ... Eva Gaëlle Green[1] () (born July 5, 1980) is an actress, raised in Paris and living in London. ...   is a Danish actor. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Jeffrey Wright (born December 7, 1965) is a Tony Award-, Emmy Award-, and Golden Globe Award-winning American film and stage actor. ... Martin Campbell (born October 24, 1944, Hastings) is a New Zealand film and television director. ... Barbara Dana Broccoli (born June 18, 1960) is the daughter of the famous James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli. ... Michael G. Wilson (born 1943) is the stepson of the late James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli and half brother to current James Bond producer, Barbara Broccoli. ... // James Bond Novels By Ian Fleming Ian Fleming. ... This article is about the author. ... Neal Purvis (born September 9, 1961) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Robert Wade (born 1962) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Paul Edward Haggis (born March 10, 1953 in London, Ontario) is an Academy Award-winning Canadian screenwriter, producer, film director, and a director/producer of television programs working in Hollywood. ... Phil Meheux (born September 17, 1941 in Sidcup, Kent, England) is an English cinematographer. ... The James Bond series of films from EON Productions has had numerous signature tunes over the years, many of which are now considered classic pieces of cinematic music. ... David Arnold (born February 27, 1962 in Luton in Bedfordshire, England) is one of the most popular and successful young British composers[citation needed]. He is probably best known for the film scores to Stargate (1994), Independence Day (1996) and four James Bond films. ... The James Bond series of films from EON Productions has had numerous signature tunes over the years, many of which are now considered classic pieces of cinematic music. ... James Bond theme chronology Die Another Day (2002) You Know My Name (2006) You Know My Name, performed by Chris Cornell, is the theme song to the 2006 James Bond film, Casino Royale. ... Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle on July 20, 1964) is an American musician best known as the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for rock bands Soundgarden (1984–1997) and Audioslave (2001–2007). ... Stuart Baird is a British film editor, producer, and director who is mainly associated with action films. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Running time 144 min
Budget US$102 million[1]
Worldwide gross US$594,239,066 [2]
Preceded by Die Another Day (2002)
Followed by Quantum of Solace (2008)
IMDb profile

Casino Royale (2006) is the twenty-first film in the James Bond series directed by Martin Campbell and the first to star Daniel Craig as MI6 agent James Bond. Based on the 1953 novel of the same name by Ian Fleming, it was adapted by screenwriters Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and Paul Haggis. The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... For the theme song of the same movie, performed by Madonna, see Die Another Day (song). ... For the short story by Ian Fleming, see For Your Eyes Only (short story collection). ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the spy series. ... The official film logo of James Bond (007) The adventures of Ian Flemings fictional secret agent, James Bond, have become a successful film series, with twenty-one titles made by EON Productions as of 2007. ... Martin Campbell (born October 24, 1944, Hastings) is a New Zealand film and television director. ... Daniel Wroughton Craig[1] (born 2 March 1968) is an English actor. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6)[1] is the United Kingdoms external intelligence agency. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming in 1952. ... See also: 1952 in literature, other events of 1953, 1954 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Casino Royale by Ian Fleming was the first James Bond novel. ... This article is about the author. ... Neal Purvis (born September 9, 1961) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Robert Wade (born 1962) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Paul Edward Haggis (born March 10, 1953 in London, Ontario) is an Academy Award-winning Canadian screenwriter, producer, film director, and a director/producer of television programs working in Hollywood. ...


It is the third screen adaptation of the Casino Royale novel, which was previously produced as a 1954 television episode and a 1967 satirical film. However, the 2006 film is the only EON Productions adaptation of Fleming's novel. It is a reboot of the Bond franchise, establishing a new timeline and narrative framework not meant to precede any previous film.[3] This not only frees the Bond franchise from more than forty years of continuity, but allows the film to show a less experienced and more vulnerable Bond.[4] The film is set at the beginning of James Bond's career as Agent 007, just as he's earning his licence to kill. After preventing a terrorist attack at Miami Airport, Bond falls for Vesper Lynd, the treasury agent assigned to provide the money he needs to foil a high-stakes poker tournament organized by Le Chiffre. The 22nd James Bond film, Quantum of Solace, will be a direct sequel to Casino Royale and will continue some aspects of the story such as Le Chiffre's associate, Mr. White. This article is about the 1967 film, for other uses of this name, see Casino Royale. ... EON Productions is a film production company known for producing the James Bond film series. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Licence to kill has at least two known meanings, it can be defined as an official sanction by a government or government agency to a particular operative or employee to initiate the use of deadly force, presumably in furtherance of the governments aims or policies, or in carrying out... Vesper Lynd is a fictional character of Ian Flemings James Bond novel Casino Royale. ... Le Chiffre is a fictional character and the main villain in Ian Flemings James Bond novel Casino Royale. ... For the short story by Ian Fleming, see For Your Eyes Only (short story collection). ...


The casting for the movie involved a widespread search for a new actor to portray James Bond, and significant controversy over Daniel Craig when he was eventually selected. Some Pierce Brosnan fans threatened to boycott the film in protest.[5] Despite this, the film, and Daniel Craig's performance in particular, earned critical acclaim. Casino Royale was produced by EON Productions for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures, marking the first official Bond film to be co-produced by the latter studio, which had produced and originally distributed the 1967 non-canonical film version. Pierce Brendan Brosnan,The most gorgeous man on the planet OBE[1] (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer best known for portraying James Bond in four films from 1995 to 2002: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ...

Contents

Plot

In Prague, James Bond corners and kills corrupt MI6 section chief Dryden and his underworld contact, earning his double-0 status. Meanwhile in Uganda, a Mr. White arranges a meeting between a banker, Le Chiffre, and the leader of a guerrilla group seeking a safe haven for his funds. Le Chiffre assures the leader that there is "no risk in the portfolio", but his investments actually involve considerable risk: he short sells successful companies and then engineers terrorist attacks to sink their stock values. For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6)[1] is the United Kingdoms external intelligence agency. ... In finance, short selling or shorting is the practice of selling securities the seller does not then own, in the hope of repurchasing them later at a lower price. ...


In his first mission as Agent 007, Bond pursues an international bomb-maker named Mollaka in Madagascar. After a parkour chase across the city to the Nambutu embassy,[6] Bond kills his target and blows up a part of the embassy to enable his escape. He obtains Mollaka's mobile phone and discovers that it has received an SMS from Alex Dimitrios, an associate of Le Chiffre in the Bahamas. Bond travels there, wins Dimitrios's Aston Martin DB5, and seduces Dimitrios's wife, Solange Dimitrios, who reveals that her husband is flying to Miami on business. Bond follows him to Miami, where he kills Dimitrios, and observes Le Chiffre's henchman, Carlos, leaving for the Miami International Airport. There, Bond foils Le Chiffre's plan to destroy the prototype Skyfleet airliner while managing to kill Carlos, leaving the banker with a major financial loss, since he had shorted and bought put options on Skyfleet stock, which then expired worthless. A traceur performs a cat balance, which in French is called an équilibre de chat. ... List of fictional countries is a list of fictional countries from published works of fiction (books, films, television series, etc. ... For other uses, see SMS (disambiguation). ... The 1963 Aston Martin DB5 was an improved DB4. ... Solange Dimitrios is a fictional character from Ian Flemings James Bond short story 007 in New York. ... , Destinations with direct service from Miami Miami International Airport (IATA: MIA, ICAO: KMIA, FAA LID: MIA) is a public airport located eight miles (13 km) northwest of the central business district of Miami, in unincorporated Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. ... Throughout the James Bond series of films Q Branch has given Bond a wide variety of vehicles with which to battle his enemies. ... A put option (sometimes simply called a put) is a financial contract between two parties, the buyer and the seller of the option. ...


Now under pressure to recoup his clients' money, Le Chiffre sets up a high-stakes poker tournament at the Casino Royale in Montenegro. Hoping that a defeat would force Le Chiffre to aid the British government in exchange for protection from his creditors, MI6 enters Bond into the tournament. He meets up with Mathis, his ally in Montenegro, and Vesper Lynd, a treasury agent, who is assigned to look after his handling of the government's $10 million buy-in. As the tournament progresses, Bond loses his initial stake and becomes enraged when Vesper refuses to authorize him to buy back in because she considers his play reckless. This article is about the country in Europe. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Bond (right) and Le Chiffre (left) play poker at the Casino Royale.

Distraught over his failure, Bond prepares to assassinate Le Chiffre when he is intercepted by one of the other players, who introduces himself as CIA officer Felix Leiter, who's also out to get Le Chiffre. Leiter believes Bond has the skill to beat Le Chiffre and offers to supply him with enough funds to re-enter the tournament in exchange for allowing the CIA custody of Le Chiffre. Back in the game, Bond rapidly recoups his losses. When Le Chiffre and his associates attempt to poison him, Bond narrowly survives due to Vesper's intervention. Bond wins the tournament on a straight flush. Following her celebratory dinner with Bond, Vesper is abducted by Le Chiffre, who uses her to lure Bond into a near-fatal car chase and ultimate capture. Le Chiffre tortures Bond for the access code to the game's winnings and when it becomes clear that Bond will not yield, Le Chiffre prepares to castrate him. At that moment Mr. White enters and executes Le Chiffre and his associates for their failure. Bond and Vesper are left alive. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... CIA redirects here. ...


Bond awakens in a hospital on Lake Como and orders Mathis, whom Le Chiffre identified as a double agent working for him, arrested. Bond admits his love for Vesper and vows to quit the service before it strips him of his humanity. Accordingly, he posts his resignation to M and goes on a romantic holiday in Venice with Vesper. However, Bond soon learns that his poker winnings were never deposited into the Treasury's account. Realizing that Vesper has stolen them, he pursues her as she meets members of the organization she is working for into a building under renovation. Bond shoots the floatation devices supporting the structure to gain access to the building, but as he does so the foundation starts to slowly collapse into the Grand Canal. After killing the henchmen in the building, Bond finds Vesper imprisoned in an elevator. Apologizing to him tearfully, she locks herself inside as elevator plunges under the rising waters. Bond dives in, breaks into the elevator and pulls Vesper onto the roof of the collapsed building. Despite his efforts to revive her, she has already drowned. Mr. White, watching from a balcony, walks away with the money. Lake Como (Lago di Como in Italian, also known as Lario; Latin: Larius Lacus) is a lake of glacial origin in Lombardy, Italy. ... A double agent pretends to spy on a target organization on behalf of a controlling organization, but in fact is loyal to the target organization. ... Grand Canal can refer to multiple waterways: Grand Canal (China) in eastern China Grand Canal (Venice) in Venice, Italy Grand Canal (Ireland) in central Ireland Grand Canal dAlsace in eastern France Grand Canal of Château de Versailles at the Palace of Versailles in France GRAND Canal or Great... For other uses, see Elevator (disambiguation). ...


Bond learns that Vesper had a French-Algerian boyfriend who was kidnapped and held for ransom by the organization behind Le Chiffre and White. Bond learns that she agreed to deliver the ransom money (his winnings) only if they would consent to leave Bond alive as well as her boyfriend. He discovers that Vesper has left Mr. White's name and number in her mobile phone for Bond to find. White, arriving at a palatial estate near Lake Como, receives a phone call and is shot in the leg. Bond appears, gun in hand, and says, "The name's Bond, James Bond." The term ransom refers to the practice of holding a prisoner to extort money or property extorted to secure their release, or to the sum of money involved. ...


Cast

  • Daniel Craig as James Bond: A British agent who, after being assigned 00-status, is sent on a mission to arrest a bomb maker in Madagascar, where he stumbles upon Le Chiffre's terrorist cell and is then sent to defeat him in a high-stakes poker game at Casino Royale.
  • Eva Green as Vesper Lynd: An agent for HM Treasury assigned to supervise Bond and finance his poker table exploits. She is actually affiliated to global terrorists and thought to be based on SOE agent Krystyna Skarbek.[7]
  • Mads Mikkelsen as Le Chiffre: A banker serving the world's terrorists. He is a mathematical genius and chess expert, and uses these skills when playing poker.
  • Judi Dench as M: The strict head of MI6. Though she feels she has promoted Bond too soon and expresses abhorrence of his rash actions, she acts as an important maternal figure in his life.
  • Ivana Miličević as Valenka: Le Chiffre's girlfriend and henchwoman.
  • Jeffrey Wright as Felix Leiter: A quiet CIA operative participating in the poker tournament while assisting Bond. This is the first official Bond film in which Leiter is played by a black actor.[8]
  • Giancarlo Giannini as René Mathis: Bond's ally in Montenegro.
  • Simon Abkarian as Alex Dimitrios: An associate of Le Chiffre, based in the Bahamas.
  • Caterina Murino as Solange Dimitrios: Dimitrios's wife, whom Bond seduces. She is killed by Le Chiffre for unintentionally revealing one of his plans to Bond.
  • Isaach De Bankolé as Steven Obanno: A Ugandan warlord introduced to Le Chiffre by Mr. White to account his finances.
  • Jesper Christensen as Mr. White: A mysterious liaison among the world's terrorists.
  • Sébastien Foucan as Mollaka: A bombmaker pursued by Bond through a construction site in Madagascar.
  • Ludger Pistor as Mendel: A Swiss banker responsible for all monetary transactions during and after the poker tournament.
  • Claudio Santamaria as Carlos: A terrorist employed by Le Chiffre to blow up an aircraft.

Two major exclusions from the film are the characters of Q and Miss Moneypenny. Their exclusion makes Casino Royale the second film in the series without Q (Live and Let Die being the first), and the first without Moneypenny. In October 2005, producer Michael G. Wilson stated that the characters were not in the movie because they were not in the book, though Moneypenny was mentioned by Bond in the novel. The decision to leave Moneypenny's character out from the film coincided with the announcement by actress Samantha Bond, who had portrayed the character in the previous four films, that she would not reprise the role.[9] Casino Royale includes a cameo by British entrepreneur Richard Branson (seen being frisked at Miami airport) The cameo was cut out of the in-flight version shown on British Airways aircraft, as was a shot of the Virgin Atlantic aircraft Branson supplied.[10] Daniel Wroughton Craig[1] (born 2 March 1968) is an English actor. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming in 1952. ... Eva Gaëlle Green[1] () (born July 5, 1980) is an actress, raised in Paris and living in London. ... Vesper Lynd is a fictional character of Ian Flemings James Bond novel Casino Royale. ... The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... Krystyna Skarbek Countess Krystyna Skarbek, G.M., O.B.E., Croix de guerre (May 1, 1908 - June 15, 1952) was a Polish-born World War II British SOE agent also known by the nom de guerre, Christine Granville. ...   is a Danish actor. ... Le Chiffre is a fictional character and the main villain in Ian Flemings James Bond novel Casino Royale. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... M is a fictional character in Ian Flemings James Bond series, as well as the films in the Bond franchise. ... Ivana Miličević (born April 26, 1974 in Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina, {formerly Yugoslavia}) is a Bosnian-born actress. ... A list of henchmen from the original 1953 novel and 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale from the List of James Bond henchmen Spoiler warning: // Steven Obanno is a villain in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Jeffrey Wright (born December 7, 1965) is a Tony Award-, Emmy Award-, and Golden Globe Award-winning American film and stage actor. ... Felix Leiter is a fictional character created by Ian Fleming in the James Bond series of novels and films. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Giancarlo Giannini (born August 1, 1942, La Spezia, Liguria, Italy) is an Oscar-nominated Italian actor and dubber. ... // M - Judi Dench Felix Leiter - Jeffrey Wright Mathis is a fictional character from the James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Simon Abkarian (Armenian: ); born March 5, 1962) is an Armenian-French actor. ... A list of henchmen from the original 1953 novel and 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale from the List of James Bond henchmen Spoiler warning: // Steven Obanno is a villain in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Caterina Murino (born September 15, 1977) is an Italian actress. ... Solange is a fictional character and Bond girl from Ian Flemings James Bond short story 007 in New York. ... Giulia Boschi as Aimée and Isaach De Bankolé as Protée in Chocolat. ... A list of henchmen from the original 1953 novel and 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale from the List of James Bond henchmen Spoiler warning: // Steven Obanno is a villain in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Jesper Christensen (born May 16, 1948 in Copenhagen, Denmark) is a Danish actor. ... Mr. ... Sébastien Foucan Sébastien Foucan is the founder of free running. ... A list of henchmen from the original 1953 novel and 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale from the List of James Bond henchmen Spoiler warning: // Steven Obanno is a villain in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Ludger Pistor (born March 16, 1959 in Herten, Germany) is an actor. ... // M - Judi Dench Felix Leiter - Jeffrey Wright Mathis is a fictional character from the James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Claudio Santamaria (born July 22, 1974 in Rome) is an Italian actor best known for portraying the terrorist Carlos in Casino Royale 2006. ... A list of henchmen from the original 1953 novel and 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale from the List of James Bond henchmen Spoiler warning: // Steven Obanno is a villain in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. ... Q is a fictional character in the James Bond novels and films. ... Jane Moneypenny, better known as Miss Moneypenny is a fictional character in the James Bond novels and films. ... Live and Let Die (1973) is the eighth spy film of the British James Bond series and the first to star Roger Moore as the fictional British secret agent James Bond. ... Samantha Bond (born November 27, 1962) is an English actress best known for her role as Miss Moneypenny in the Pierce Brosnan James Bond films. ... Sir Richard Charles Nicholas Branson (born 18 July 1950) is an English business magnate, best known for his Virgin brand of over 360 companies. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ... Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd. ...


Production

EON Productions gained the rights for Casino Royale in 1999 after Sony Pictures Entertainment exchanged them for MGM's rights to Spider-Man.[11] In March 2004, Neal Purvis and Robert Wade began writing a screenplay for Pierce Brosnan as Bond, aiming to bring back an Ian Fleming flavour.[12] Paul Haggis' main contribution was to rewrite the climax of the film. He explained, "the draft that was there was very faithful to the book. And there was a confession. So in the original draft the character confessed and killed herself. And then she sent Bond to chase after the villains. And Bond chased the villains into the house. And I don't know why but I thought that Vesper had to be in the sinking house and Bond has to want to kill her and then try and save her."[13] EON Productions is a film production company known for producing the James Bond film series. ... Sony Pictures Entertainment, Inc. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... Neal Purvis (born September 9, 1961) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Robert Wade (born 1962) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Paul Edward Haggis (born March 10, 1953 in London, Ontario) is an Academy Award-winning Canadian screenwriter, producer, film director, and a director/producer of television programs working in Hollywood. ...


Director Quentin Tarantino expressed interest in directing an adaptation of the Casino Royale novel,[14] though this was only a personal interest, and he did not follow this up with EON. In the June 2007 issue of GQ (UK) Tarantino confirmed his desire to make Casino Royale after Pulp Fiction. Tarantino claims to have worked behind the scenes with the Fleming family, and believes that this was the reason why filmmakers finally went ahead with Casino Royale.[15] In February 2005, Martin Campbell was announced as the film's director.[16] Later in 2005, Sony led a consortium that purchased MGM, allowing Sony to gain distribution rights starting with this film.[17] Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an Academy Award- and Palme dOr-winning American film director, screenwriter and actor. ... GQ can refer to several things: Gentlemens Quarterly, a mens magazine The ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code for Equatorial Guinea GQ, a replacement Quake 1 game engine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ...


EON admitted that they had relied too heavily on CGI effects in the more recent films, particularly Die Another Day, and were keen to accomplish the stunts in Casino Royale "the old fashioned way."[18] In keeping with this drive for more realism, screenwriters Purvis, Wade, and Haggis wanted the script to follow as closely as possible to the original 1953 novel, keeping Fleming's darker storyline and characterization of Bond.[19] Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


Casino Royale became the first Bond film to take its title from a Fleming novel or short story since 1987's The Living Daylights. It is also the first Bond film since then not to be adapted as a novelization. Instead, a film tie-in edition of Fleming's original novel was published.[20] For other uses, see The Living Daylights (disambiguation). ... A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ... A tie-in is an authorized product that is based on an existing or upcoming media property, such as a movie or video/DVD, computer game, video game, television program/television series, board game, web site, role-playing game or literary property. ...


Casting

Throughout 2004 and 2005, a whole legion of potential new actors to portray James Bond were speculated on by the media, ranging from established Hollywood actors, such as Eric Bana, Hugh Jackman, Goran Višnjić and Clive Owen, to many unknown actors from a number of different countries.[21] At one point producer Michael G. Wilson claimed there was a list of over 200 names being considered.[22] English actor Colin Salmon, who had played the role of MI6 operative Charles Robinson in earlier Bond films alongside Pierce Brosnan, was also considered for the role and raised speculation that he might become the first black Bond.[23] According to Martin Campbell, Henry Cavill was the only actor in serious contention for the role. But being only 22 years old at the time, he was considered too young.[24] Eric Bana (born Eric Banadinovich on August 9, 1968) is an Australian film and television actor. ... Hugh Michael Jackman (born 12 October 1968 in Pymble, New South Wales) is an Australian film, television and stage actor. ... Goran ViÅ¡njić (pronounced // (VISH-nyich); born September 9, 1972) is a Croatian actor who has appeared in American films and television productions. ... Clive Owen (born October 3, 1964) is a Golden Globe and BAFTA winning critically acclaimed English actor, now a regular performer in Hollywood and independent American films. ... Michael G. Wilson (born 1943) is the stepson of the late James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli and half brother to current James Bond producer, Barbara Broccoli. ... Colin Salmon (1962) is an English actor best known for playing the fictional character Charles Robinson in three James Bond films. ... The following is a list of allies found throughout the James Bond film and novel series. ... Henry Cavill (born 5 May 1983) is a British actor. ...


In May 2005, Daniel Craig announced that MGM and producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli had assured him that he would get the role of Bond, and Matthew Vaughn told reporters that MGM offered him the opportunity to direct, but EON Productions at that point had not approached either of them.[25] Later, Craig stated that the producers had indeed offered him the role, but he had declined until a script was available for him to read.[26] Matthew Vaughn (born 7 March 1971) is a film producer (Layer Cake, Snatch, Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels among others), director (Layer Cake) and husband of Claudia Schiffer, whom he married in 2002. ...


By August 2005, speculation was high that the 37-year-old Daniel Craig was being seriously considered, although full casting for the role was not actually done until September. Then, on October 14, 2005, EON Productions and Sony Pictures Entertainment confirmed to the public at a press conference in London that Daniel Craig would be the sixth actor to portray James Bond.[27] Significant controversy followed the decision, as it was doubted if the producers had made the right choice. Throughout the entire production period Internet campaigns such as "danielcraigisnotbond.com" expressed their dissatisfaction and threatened to boycott the film in protest.[28] Craig, unlike previous actors, was not considered by the protesters to fit the tall, dark, handsome and charismatic image of Bond to which viewers had been accustomed.[5] The Daily Mirror ran a front page news story critical of Craig, with the headline, The Name's Bland — James Bland.[29] is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The next important casting was that of the lead Bond girl, Vesper Lynd. Casting director Debbie McWilliams acknowledged that Hollywood actresses Angelina Jolie and Charlize Theron were strongly considered for the role and that Belgian actress Cécile de France had also auditioned, but her English accent "wasn't up to scratch."[30] Audrey Tautou was also considered, but not chosen because of her role in The Da Vinci Code that was released in May 2006.[31] It was announced on February 16, 2006 that French actress Eva Green would play the role of Vesper Lynd.[32] A Bond Girl is a character or actress portraying a love interest or sex object of James Bond in a film, novel or video game. ... Angelina Jolie (born Angelina Jolie Voight on June 4, 1975) is an American film actor, a former fashion model, and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... Charlize Theron (born August 7, 1975) is a South African-American actress and former fashion model. ... Cécile de France (born July 17, 1975) is a Belgian Actress. ... English English is a term that has been applied to the English language as spoken in England. ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; , born August 9, 1976) is a French film actress, known to worldwide audiences for playing the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and also Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... This article is about the film. ... Eva Gaëlle Green[1] () (born July 5, 1980) is an actress, raised in Paris and living in London. ...


Filming

Producer Michael G. Wilson and Craig in Venice during filming.
Producer Michael G. Wilson and Craig in Venice during filming.

Principal photography for Casino Royale commenced on 30 January 2006 and concluded on 21 July 2006. The film was primarily shot at Barrandov Studios in Prague, with additional location shooting in the Czech Republic, the Bahamas, Italy, and the United Kingdom. The shooting schedule concluded at Pinewood Studios.[33] Image File history File links Daniel_Craig_on_Venice_yacht_crop_w_Wilson. ... Image File history File links Daniel_Craig_on_Venice_yacht_crop_w_Wilson. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barrandov Studios are a famous set of film studios in Prague, Czech Republic. ... [--168. ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ...


Initially, Michael G. Wilson confirmed that Casino Royale would either be filmed or take place in Prague and South Africa. However, EON Productions encountered problems in securing film locations in South Africa.[34] After no other locations became available, the producers had to reconsider their options. In September 2005, Martin Campbell and director of photography Phil Meheux were scouting Paradise Island in the Bahamas as a possible location for the film.[35] On 6 October 2005, Martin Campbell confirmed that Casino Royale would film in the Bahamas and "maybe Italy." In addition to the extensive location filming, studio work including choreography and stunt coordination practice was performed at the Barrandov Studios in Prague and at Pinewood Studios where the film used several stages as well as the paddock tank and the historic "Albert R. Broccoli 007 Stage". Further shooting in the UK was scheduled for Dunsfold Aerodrome in Surrey, the cricket pavilion at Eton College (although that particular scene was cut from the completed movie) and the Millbrook Vehicle Proving Ground in Bedfordshire.[5] Cameraman redirects here. ... Phil Meheux (born September 17, 1941 in Sidcup, Kent, England) is an English cinematographer. ... The Royal Towers joined by the Bridge. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Albert R. Broccoli 007 Stage (commonly just 007 Stage) is one of the largest sound stages in the world. ... Dunsfold is a village in the Waverley district of the county of Surrey, England, fourteen kilometres south of Guildford. ... This article is about the English county. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds. ...


After Prague, the production moved to the Bahamas. Several locations around New Providence were used for filming during February and March, particularly on Paradise Island. Footage set in Mbale, Uganda was filmed at Black Park, Country Park in Buckinghamshire concluding on 4 July 2006. Additional scenes took place at Albany House, an estate owned by golfers Ernie Els and Tiger Woods.[36] The crew returned to the Czech Republic in April, and continued there, filming in Prague, Planá and Loket, before completing in the town of Karlovy Vary in May. A famous Czech spa Karlovy Vary, in German known as the Karlsbad, was used as the exterior of the Casino Royale, with the Grandhotel Pupp serving as "Hotel Splendide".[37] The main Italian location mentioned by Campbell was Venice, where the majority of the film's ending is set. Other scenes in the later half of the film were shot in late May and early June at the Villa del Balbianello on the shores of Lake Como.[38] Further exterior shooting for the movie took place at properties such as the Villa la Gaeta, near the lakeside town of Menaggio.[5] For other uses, see New Providence (disambiguation). ... Mbale is an eastern Ugandan district in the foothills of Mount Elgon. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Theodore Ernest Ernie Els (born October 17, 1969) is a South African golfer who has been one of the top professional players in the world since the mid-1990s. ... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 1 in (1. ... Planá is a village in Tachov District in the Czech Republic. ... Loket Castle Loket Castle (Czech: ) is a Gothic castle located 10 km east of Sokolov, Karlovy Vary Region, Czech Republic. ... Czech Republic Karlovy Vary Karlovy Vary 59. ... A destination spa is a business establishment which people visit for personal health, life enhancement, fitness, personal care treatments such as massages, facials, in a resort setting. ... The Grandhotel Pupp (IPA: ) is a 228-room luxury hotel located in Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Villa del Balbianello The Villa del Balbianello is a villa in the commune of Lenno (CO), Italy, overlooking Lake Como. ... Lake Como (Lago di Como in Italian, also known as Lario; Latin: Larius Lacus) is a lake of glacial origin in Lombardy, Italy. ... Menaggio is a town and commune in the province of Como, Lombardy, Italy, located on the western shore of Lake Como at the mouth of the river Senagra. ...


On 30 July 2006, a fire broke out at the 007 Stage. The damage was significant, but had no effect on the release of Casino Royale as the incident occurred one week after filming had been completed, and the sets were in the process of being dismantled.[39] On 11 August 2006, Pinewood Studios confirmed that no attempt would be made to salvage the remains of the stage,[40] instead it would be rebuilt from scratch.[41] is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Effects

The gunbarrel sequence modified as part of the opening sequence.
The gunbarrel sequence modified as part of the opening sequence.

In designing the credit sequence for the film, graphic designer Daniel Kleinman was inspired by the cover of the 1953 British first edition of Casino Royale, which featured Ian Fleming's original design of a playing card bordered by eight red hearts dripping with blood.[42] Kleinman said, "The hearts not only represent cards but the tribulations of Bond's love story. So I took that as inspiration to use playing card graphics in different ways in the titles," like a club representing a puff of gun smoke, and slashed arteries spurting thousands of tiny hearts.[43] In creating the shadow images of the sequence, Kleinman digitized the footage of Craig and the film's stuntmen on the Inferno visual effects system, at Framestore CFC in London; the actors' silhouettes were incorporated into more than 20 digitally animated scenes depicting intricate and innovative card patterns.[44] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The James Bond gun barrel sequence is the traditional opening to every official (EON Productions) James Bond movie, beginning with the first film, Dr. No, in 1962. ... Daniel Kleinman is a British television commercial and music video director who is also the current title sequence designer for the James Bond series of films, starting with 1995s GoldenEye. ... Framestore CFC is one of the largest digital film special effects companies in Europe. ...


For the rest of the film, Special Effects and Miniature Effects Supervisor Chris Corbould, as with the producers, wanted to return to a more realistic style of film making and significantly reduce digital effects. According to Corbould, “CGI is a great tool and can be very useful, but I will fight to the tooth and nail to do something for real. It’s the best way to go”.[33] Three scenes involving primarily physical effects in the film were the chase at a building site in Madagascar, the Miami Airport chase sequence, and the sinking Venetian house, with sets located on the Grand Canal and in Pinewood Studios.[33] Chris Corbould is a four time BAFTA nominated British special effects coordinator best known for his work on major blockbuster films and the action scenes on some 11 James Bond films since the early 1980s. ... Miami International Airport (IATA: MIA, ICAO: KMIA), is a major airport located in unincorporated Miami-Dade County, Florida between the cities of Hialeah, Doral, and Miami Springs, the village of Virginia Gardens, and the unincorporated community of Fountainbleau. ...


First on the schedule were the scenes on the Madagascar building site, shot in the Bahamas on the site of a derelict hotel which Michael G. Wilson had become acquainted with in 1977 during the filming of The Spy Who Loved Me.[33] In the scene, Bond drives a digger toward the building, slamming into the concrete plinth on which Mollaka is running. The stunt team built a model and put forward several ways in which the digger could conceivably take out the concrete, including taking out the pillar underneath. A section of the concrete wall was removed to fit the digger, and reinforced with steel.[33]


The sequence at Miami International Airport was partly shot at the Dunsfold Aerodrome in Surrey, with some footage from the Prague and Miami airports.[33] In filming the scene in which the engine thrust of the moving aircraft blows the police car high into the air, second unit directors Ian Lowe, Terry Madden, and Alex Witt used a crane with a strong lead cable attached to the rear bumper of the vehicle to move it up and backwards at the moment of full extension away from the plane.[33]


The sinking of the Venetian house at the climax of the film featured the largest rig ever built for a Bond film.[33] For the scene involving Bond following Vesper into the house undergoing renovation supported by inflatable balloons, a tank was constructed at the 007 stage at Pinewood, consisting of a Venetian piazza and the interior of the three-story dilapidated house. The rig, weighing some 90 tons, incorporated electronics with hydraulic valves which were closely controlled by computer because of the dynamic movement within the system on its two axes. The same computer system also controlled the exterior model which the effects team built to one-third scale to film the building eventually collapsing into the Venetian canal. The model elevator within the rig could be immersed in 19 feet (5.8 m) of water, and utilized banks of compressors to strictly regulate movement.[33]


The scene involving the car crash was devised using an Aston Martin DB9 – modified to look like Bond's Aston Martin DBS V12 – specially modified and reinforced to withstand the impact. Due to the low centre of gravity of the vehicle, an 18-inch (450 mm) ramp had to be implemented on the road tarmac at Millbrook Proving Grounds and stunt driver Adam Kirley had to use an air cannon located behind the driver's seat to propel the car into a roll at the precise moment of impact. At a speed exceeding 70 mph (113 km/h), the car rotated seven times while being filmed, and was confirmed by the Guinness Book of Records on November 5, 2006 as a new world record.[33] Aston Martin DB9 Coupé - front view Aston Martin DB9 Coupé - rear view The Aston Martin DB9 is a grand tourer launched by Aston Martin in 2004. ... This article is about the new Aston Martin DBS V12, for the classic, 1967 to 1972 GT car, see Aston Martin DBS. The Aston Martin DBS is the latest supercar to be announced by the Aston Martin and featured prominently in the James Bond film Casino Royale. ... General Motors operates several proving grounds // GM Desert Proving Grounds in Mesa, Arizona is a General Motors facility for the testing of HVAC, propulsion, and various automotive systems in a harsh climate. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ...


Music

The soundtrack of Casino Royale, released by Sony Classical on November 14, 2006 featured music composed by veteran composer David Arnold, his fourth soundtrack for the Bond film series, while Nicholas Dodd orchestrated and conducted the score. Producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli announced on July 26, 2006 that Chris Cornell, who was the lead singer for Audioslave and Soundgarden, composed and performed the title song "You Know My Name".[45] The soundtrack to the 2006 film Casino Royale was released by Sony Classical on November 14, 2006. ... Sony Classical is the successor to the Columbia and CBS Masterworks labels, assuming its new identity after the purchase of CBS Records by Sony Corporation. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Arnold (born February 27, 1962 in Luton in Bedfordshire, England) is one of the most popular and successful young British composers[citation needed]. He is probably best known for the film scores to Stargate (1994), Independence Day (1996) and four James Bond films. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle on July 20, 1964) is an American musician best known as the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for rock bands Soundgarden (1984–1997) and Audioslave (2001–2007). ... For the bands self-titled album, see Audioslave (album). ... Soundgarden was an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington in 1984 by lead singer and drummer Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. ... James Bond theme chronology Die Another Day (2002) You Know My Name (2006) You Know My Name, performed by Chris Cornell, is the theme song to the 2006 James Bond film, Casino Royale. ...


"You Know My Name" is the first theme song since 1983's Octopussy to use a different title than the film, and Cornell is the first male performer since a-ha in 1987's The Living Daylights. It is the fourth title theme after Dr. No, On Her Majesty's Secret Service and Octopussy, that does not make any reference to the title of the film.[46] It is the first title song to be repeated in the end credits since "A View to a Kill". The end titles begin with the James Bond theme, but halfway through, an abbreviated version of Cornell's song is played. The song's main notes are played throughout the film as a substitute for the James Bond theme, to represent Bond's immaturity. The classic theme only plays during the end credits to signal the end of his character arc.[47] For other uses, see Octopussy (disambiguation). ... a-ha is a Grammy Award-nominated band from Norway. ... Dr. No is a 1962 spy film. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see On Her Majestys Secret Service. ... The James Bond Theme is one of the signature themes for the James Bond films. ...


Release

Casino Royale premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square, the Odeon West End and the Empire simultaneously in London on November 14, 2006. It marked the 60th Royal Film Performance and benefited the Cinema & Television Benevolent Fund (CTBF), whose patron, Queen Elizabeth II, was in attendance with the Duke of Edinburgh. It was the third James Bond premiere that the Queen had attended following You Only Live Twice (1967) and Die Another Day (2002).[48] Along with the cast and crew, numerous celebrities and 5,000 paying guests were also in attendance with half the proceeds benefiting the CTBF.[49] Odeon Leicester Square The Odeon Leicester Square is a cinema which occupies the centre of the eastern side of Leicester Square, London, dominating the Square with its huge black polished granite facade and 120 feet high tower displaying its name. ... Categories: Stub | London attractions | Cinemas in London ... Empire Leicester Square The Empire is a large cinema on the north side of Leicester Square, in the City of Westminster, a London Borough. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see You Only Live Twice. ... For the theme song of the same movie, performed by Madonna, see Die Another Day (song). ...


Only two days following the premiere, pirated copies appeared for sale in London. “The rapid appearance of this film on the streets shows the sophistication and organisation behind film piracy in the UK,” said Kieron Sharp, from the Federation Against Copyright Theft.[50] Pirated copies of the DVD were selling for less than £1. Craig himself was offered such a DVD while walking anonymously through the streets of Beijing wearing a hat and glasses in order to avoid being identified.[51] Peking redirects here. ...


In January 2007, Casino Royale became the first Bond film ever to be shown in mainland Chinese cinemas.[52] It was reported that the Chinese version was released without alteration, but it emerged that it had been edited before release, with the reference to the Cold War re-dubbed and new dialogue added during the poker scene explaining the process of Texas Hold'em, as the game is less familiar in China. Casino Royale earned approximately $11.7 million in China since its opening on January 30 on 468 screens,[53] including a record opening weekend collection for a non-Chinese film, with $1.5 million.[54] Texas hold em (or simply hold em or holdem) is the most popular of the community card poker games. ...


Box office

The film achieved GB£1.7 million of ticket sales in the UK on its first day of release. Weekend opening total in the UK was GB£13,400,000. The film also opened in the Republic of Ireland with over 1,100,000 in the first 2 weeks. Altogether the film took about €4,200,000 in Ireland. From November 16 to November 19, 2006, the film took in over $40,000,000.[55] GBP redirects here. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Opening day estimates in the United States and Canada showed Casino Royale on top with $14,750,000, while opening weekend estimates showed it in the second place with $40,600,000,[56] as well as earning another $42,000,000 internationally. Although Happy Feet won the overall weekend box office contest, the significance of such a comparison in earnings is problematic, as Happy Feet has little more than half the running time of Casino Royale, and therefore had significantly more screenings per day, which translates into more potential gross. A better indication of the film's relative performances is that Casino Royale, per theatre, outperformed Happy Feet, which was released in 370 more theatres. According to Box Office Mojo, Casino Royale took in, on average, $11,890 per theatre, while Happy Feet grossed $10,918 per theatre.[57][2] Happy Feet is an Academy Award-winning Australian-produced 2006 computer-animated comedy-drama film, directed and co-written by George Miller. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ...


Casino Royale opened at the first position in 27 countries, with a weekend gross of $43,407,886 worldwide.[58] As of March 30, 2007 it has grossed over $593,352,994 globally,[59] breaking both the domestic and international box office records of Die Another Day. The film held the opening weekend record in India, taking in over $3,386,987, which was the highest for a foreign language film at the time.[60][61] In Russia, the film made over $4.5 million, the eighth largest opening for a non-Russian film.[62] is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Home video

Casino Royale was simultaneously released on DVD, UMD, and Blu-ray Disc on March 13, 2007.[63] In the UK, Casino Royale was released on March 19, 2007 on DVD and Blu-ray Disc.[64] The DVD and Blu-ray Disc releases broke sales records: the region 1 Blu-ray Disc edition became the highest selling high-definition title to date, selling more than 100,000 copies since its release.[65] The region 2 DVD edition achieved the record of fastest selling title for its first-week release. The UK DVD has continued to sell well, with 1,622,852 copies sold since March 19.[66] A copy of the Blu-ray Disc edition of Casino Royale was given out to the first 500,000 PAL PlayStation 3 owners who signed up to the PlayStation Network.[67] The DVD release includes the official music video for the film, and three documentaries detailing how Daniel Craig was chosen for the role of Bond, the filming, and an expanded version of the Bond Girls Are Forever documentary incorporating new interviews with Casino Royale cast members. DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... A UMD The Universal Media Disc (UMD) is an optical disc medium developed by Sony for use on the PlayStation Portable. ... Blu-ray Disc (also known as Blu-ray or BD) is an optical disc storage media format. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... Official logo for PlayStation Network PlayStation Network, often abbreviated to PSN in the gaming community, is Sonys free online service provided for use with their PlayStation 3 [1] and PlayStation Portable video game consoles. ... Bond Girls Are Forever is a 2002 book and James Bond documentary film hosted by The Living Daylights actress Maryam dAbo. ...


A three-disc edition of Casino Royale will be released in the United States on 3 June 2008. As well as features present from the 2007 release, the collector's edition contains an audio commentary, deleted scenes, featurettes and a storyboard-to-film comparison.[68]-1... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... On a DVD (or laserdisc), an audio commentary is a bonus track consisting of a lecture or comments by one or more speakers, who talk about the movie as it progresses. ...


Reception

Reviews

Critics gave the film a positive response, in particular Craig's performance and credibility. During production this had been subject to debate by the media and the public, as Craig did not appear to fit Ian Fleming's original portrait of the character as tall, dark, and suave. The Daily Telegraph compared the quality of Craig's characterization of Bond to Sean Connery's and praised the script as smartly written, noting how the film departed from the series' conventions. The Times compared the more assertive portrayal by Craig to Timothy Dalton, and praised the action as edgy,[69] with another reviewer citing in particular the action sequence involving the cranes in Madagascar.[70] Critic Paul Arendt of BBC Films,[71] Kim Newman of Empire[72] and Todd McCarthy of Variety[73] all described Craig as the first actor to truly embody Ian Fleming's James Bond from the original novel: ironic, brutal, and cold. This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... For other uses, see Times. ... Timothy Peter Dalton (born March 21, 1946[1]) is an English actor of stage and screen, best known for portraying James Bond in The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989) and in his roles in Shakespearean related films and plays. ... Kim Newman (born July 31, 1959) is an English journalist, film critic, and fiction writer. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ...


The film was similarly well received in North America. MSNBC gave the movie a perfect 5 star rating.[74] The film was described as taking James Bond "back to his roots", similar to From Russia with Love,[75] where the focus was on character and plot rather than the high-tech gadgets and visual effects that were strongly criticised in Die Another Day.[76] Rotten Tomatoes gave the movie an aggregate rating of 94%, the highest rating for a wide-release of the year. It is the fifth-highest rating for a Bond film on the site behind Goldfinger which received a 95%, The Spy Who Loved Me and From Russia with Love which both received a 96%,[77][78] and Dr. No, with a 97% score.[79] Metacritic gave the movie a Metascore of 81, signifying "Universal Acclaim."[80] Entertainment Weekly named the film as the fifth best of the series,[81] and chose Vesper Lynd as the fourth best Bond girl in the series.[82] Some newspaper columnists and critics were impressed enough by Craig's performance to consider him a viable candidate for an Academy Award nomination.[83][84][85] For the news website, see msnbc. ... The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Sean Connery as the MI6 agent. ... The Spy Who Loved Me, released in 1977, is the 10th film in the James Bond series and the third to star Roger Moore as MI6 agent James Bond. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


However, the film met several mixed reactions. Though American radio personality Michael Medved gave the film three stars out of four, describing it as "intriguing, audacious and very original... more believable and less cartoonish, than previous 007 extravaganzas", he commented that the "sometimes sluggish pacing will frustrate some Bond fanatics."[86] Similarly, a reviewer for The Sun praised the film for its darkness and Craig's performance, but felt that "like the novel, it suffers from a lack of sharpness in the plot" and believed that it required additional editing, particularly the finale.[87] Commentators such as Emanuel Levy concurred, feeling the ending was too long, and that the film's terrorist villains lacked depth, although he praised Craig and gave the film a B+ overall.[88] Other reviewers responded negatively, including Tim Adams of The Observer who felt the film came off uncomfortably in an attempt to make the series grittier, and criticized Craig's performance with the review title "You might be shaken, but this Bond won't leave you stirred".[89] Steve Sailer of The American Conservative also criticised the film, saying it was "mediocre in execution and bloated in conception, wrapping the usual elephantine Bond movie mechanics around Fleming's minimal plot".[90] Michael Medved (born October 3, 1948) is a Jewish-American, neoconservative radio talk show host, film critic, and author. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... Emanuel Levy is an American film critic active since the early 1980s. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Steve Sailer Steven Ernest Sailer (born December 20, 1958) is an American journalist and movie critic for The American Conservative, ex-correspondent for UPI, and VDARE.com columnist. ... The American Conservative magazine. ...


Top Ten Lists

The film appeared on many critics' top ten lists of the best films of 2006.[91]

Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... The Oregonian is the major daily newspaper in Portland, Oregon, owned by Advance Publications. ... Salon. ... The daily Seattle Post-Intelligencer is the second leading newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ... ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... The Oregonian is the major daily newspaper in Portland, Oregon, owned by Advance Publications. ...

Awards

At the 2006 British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards, Casino Royale won the Film Award for Best Sound (Chris Munro, Eddy Joseph, Mike Prestwood Smith, Martin Cantwell, Mark Taylor), and the Orange Rising Star Award, which was won by Eva Green.[92] The film was nominated for eight BAFTA awards, including the Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film of the Year; Best Screenplay (Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Paul Haggis); the Anthony Asquith Award for Best Film Music (David Arnold); Best Cinematography (Phil Meheux); Best Editing (Stuart Baird); Best Production Design (Peter Lamont, Simon Wakefield); Best Achievement in Special Visual Effects (Steve Begg, Chris Corbould, John Paul Docherty, Ditch Doy); and Best Actor (Daniel Craig). This made Craig the first actor ever to receive a BAFTA nomination for a performance as James Bond.[93] He also received the Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actor.[94] BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Rising Star Award (or known as Orange Rising Star Award) is one of the award categories for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) which acknowledges new talents in the acting industry. ... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... David Arnold (born February 27, 1962 in Luton in Bedfordshire, England) is one of the most popular and successful young British composers[citation needed]. He is probably best known for the film scores to Stargate (1994), Independence Day (1996) and four James Bond films. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actors of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Established in 1973, this film award is given to outstanding achievement in British film by the British newspaper Evening Standard. ...


Casino Royale won the Excellence in Production Design Award from the Art Directors Guild,[95] and singer Chris Cornell's "You Know My Name" won the International Press Academy Satellite Award for Best Original Song.[96] The film was nominated for five Saturn Awards — Best Action/Adventure/Thriller Film, Best Actor (Daniel Craig), Best Supporting Actress (Eva Green), Best Writing (Purvis, Wade and Haggis) and Best Music (David Arnold).[97] The 2006 Golden Tomato Awards named Casino Royale the Wide Release Film of the Year.[98] Casino Royale was also nominated for, and has won, many other international awards for its screenplay,[99] film editing,[100] visual effects,[101] and production design.[102] At the 2007 Saturn Awards, the film was declared to be the Best Action/Adventure/Thriller film of 2006.[103] Several members of the crew were also recipients of 2007 Taurus World Stunt Awards, including Gary Powell for Best Stunt Coordination and Ben Cooke, Kai Martin, Marvin Stewart-Campbell, and Adam Kirley for Best High Work.[104] Art Directors Guild is the guild of the American Art Directors. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy and horror in film, television and home video. ...


References

  1. ^ Box Office History for James Bond Movies. The Numbers. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  2. ^ a b Casino Royale box office. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2006-11-21.
  3. ^ IGN: Interview: Campbell on Casino Royale. IGN.com. IGN Entertainment, Inc (2005-10-19). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  4. ^ New James Bond Proves Worthy of Double-0 Status. SPACE.com (2006-10-21). Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  5. ^ a b c d Blond, James Blond. CNN. CNN (2006-11-06). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  6. ^ Curtis - Sébastien's stunt double. www.theurbanheroes.com (2006-11-29). Retrieved on 2007-05-14. “Curtis was hired to be a stunt double in the recent James Bond film Casino Royale. He was on location in the Bahamas for 13 weeks working closely with Gary Powell, the stunt coordinator, to help plan and execute the opening chase scene.”
  7. ^ McCormick, Donald (1993). The Life of Ian Fleming. Peter Owen Publishers, p.151. 
  8. ^ The only other black actor to portray Felix Leiter was Bernie Casey in Never Say Never Again.
  9. ^ Hastings, Chris; Nina Goswami and David Fickling. "Ah, Miss Moneypenny. I'm afraid we will not require your services", Telegraph.co.uk, 2005-10-16. Retrieved on 2006-11-21. 
  10. ^ "BA cuts Branson from Bond movie", BBC News, 21 April 2007
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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard Terry Casey (born June 8, 1939) was an American Football player during the 1960s who later became an actor. ... For the song by the Bee Gees, see Odessa (album). ... The electronic telegraph (the initial lowercase was a marketing device) was Europes first daily web-based newspaper. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! 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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... June 2007 is the sixth month of that year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under the name The Times since 1788; it is the original Times newspaper. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... American Cinematographer is a monthly journal published by the American Society of Cinematographers. ... December 2006 is the twelfth and final month of the year and will begin in 2 day(s). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Amazon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For the branch of the British Secret Service, see MI6. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the branch of the British Secret Service, see MI6. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the branch of the British Secret Service, see MI6. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the branch of the British Secret Service, see MI6. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... The Spy Who Loved Me, released in 1977, is the 10th film in the James Bond series and the third to star Roger Moore as MI6 agent James Bond. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Amazon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the web browser produced by this corporation, see Netscape (web browser). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eurogamer homepage Eurogamer is a Brighton-based website focused on video games news and reviews. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kim Newman (born July 31, 1959) is an English journalist, film critic, and fiction writer. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Bold textReed Business Information is the largest business publisher in the United States and a division of Reed Elsevier. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orlando Sentinel is the primary newspaper of the Orlando, Florida region. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Medved (born October 3, 1948) is a Jewish-American, neoconservative radio talk show host, film critic, and author. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Casino Royale (2006)
Official sites
  • Official Sony Casino Royale Site
  • Official Casino Royale Blog
Other
  • Boeing 747 in Casino Royale at Aerospaceweb.org
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article is about the spy series. ... EON Productions is a film production company known for producing the James Bond film series. ... Dr. No is a 1962 spy film. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see From Russia with Love. ... Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Sean Connery as the MI6 agent. ... For other topics with this name, see Thunderball. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see You Only Live Twice. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see On Her Majestys Secret Service. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Live and Let Die (1973) is the eighth spy film of the British James Bond series and the first to star Roger Moore as the fictional British secret agent James Bond. ... The Man with the Golden Gun, released in 1974, is the ninth film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Roger Moore as the fictional British secret agent James Bond. ... The Spy Who Loved Me, released in 1977, is the 10th film in the James Bond series and the third to star Roger Moore as MI6 agent James Bond. ... Moonraker is a 1979 spy film. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Octopussy (disambiguation). ... A View to a Kill is a 1985 spy film. ... For other uses, see The Living Daylights (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ... Tomorrow Never Dies, released in 1997, is the eighteenth spy film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Pierce Brosnan as MI6 agent James Bond. ... For other uses, see The World Is Not Enough (disambiguation). ... For the theme song of the same movie, performed by Madonna, see Die Another Day (song). ... For the short story by Ian Fleming, see For Your Eyes Only (short story collection). ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... George Robert Lazenby (born September 5, 1939) is an Australian actor best known for portraying James Bond only once in the 1969 James Bond film, On Her Majestys Secret Service. ... For other persons named Roger Moore, see Roger Moore (disambiguation). ... Timothy Peter Dalton (born March 21, 1946[1]) is an English actor of stage and screen, best known for portraying James Bond in The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989) and in his roles in Shakespearean related films and plays. ... Pierce Brendan Brosnan,The most gorgeous man on the planet OBE[1] (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer best known for portraying James Bond in four films from 1995 to 2002: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Daniel Wroughton Craig[1] (born 2 March 1968) is an English actor. ... This article is about the 1967 film, for other uses of this name, see Casino Royale. ... For the song by the Bee Gees, see Odessa (album). ... Barry Nelson (April 16, 1917 - April 7, 2007[1]) was an American actor noted as the first actor to portray Ian Flemings secret agent James Bond. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ...

 
 

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