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Encyclopedia > Cartoon
Example of a modern cartoon. The text was excerpted by cartoonist Greg Williams from the Wikipedia article Dr. Seuss.
Example of a modern cartoon. The text was excerpted by cartoonist Greg Williams from the Wikipedia article Dr. Seuss.

A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations with varied meanings. The term has evolved from its original meaning in art of a preparatory drawing, to the more modern meaning of humorous illustrations in magazines and newspapers, and further to the contemporary meaning referring to animated programs. Look up cartoon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (pronounced ; March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist, better known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss (often pronounced , but he himself said [1]). He published over 48 childrens books, which were often characterized by his imaginative characters, rhyme, and frequent use... Look up illustration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...

Contents

Art

A cartoon (from the Italian "cartone" and Dutch word "karton", meaning strong, heavy paper or pasteboard) is a full-size drawing made on paper as a study for further drawings, such as a painting or tapestry. Cartoons were typically used in the production of frescoes, to accurately link the component parts of the composition when painted onto plaster over a series of days. Such cartoons often have pinpricks along the outlines of the design; a bag of soot was then rubbed over the cartoon, held against the wall to leave black dots on the plaster ("pouncing"). Cartoons by painters such as the Raphael Cartoons in London and examples by Leonardo da Vinci are highly prized in their own right. Tapestry cartoons, usually coloured, were followed by eye by the weavers on the loom. For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... For the adhesive medical dressing, see Adhesive bandage. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... The Miraculous Draught of Fishes St Paul Preaching in Athens Christs Charge to Peter The Death of Ananias The Raphael Cartoons are seven large cartoons for tapestries, now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, painted by the High Renaissance painter Raphael in 1515-16 and showing scenes from... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ...


Print media

"Cartoon no.1: Substance and Shadow", an illustration by John Leech that satirizes the preparatory cartoons for frescoes in the new Palace of Westminster (1843), and which created the modern meaning of the word "cartoon"
"Cartoon no.1: Substance and Shadow", an illustration by John Leech that satirizes the preparatory cartoons for frescoes in the new Palace of Westminster (1843), and which created the modern meaning of the word "cartoon"

In modern print media, a cartoon is a piece of art, usually humorous in intent. This usage dates from 1843 when Punch magazine applied the term to satirical drawings in its pages,[1] particularly sketches by John Leech. The first of these parodied the preparatory cartoons for grand historical frescoes in the then-new Palace of Westminster. The original title for these drawings was Mr Punch's face is the letter Q and the new title "cartoon" was intended to be ironic, a reference to the self-aggrandising posturing of Westminster politicians. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1392x1103, 539 KB) The first cartoon Substanse and Shadow(1843) by John Leech . ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1392x1103, 539 KB) The first cartoon Substanse and Shadow(1843) by John Leech . ... Portrait of John Leech. ... Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ...


Modern gag cartoons, found in magazines and newspapers, generally consist of a single drawing with a caption immediately beneath or (less often) a speech balloon. Many consider New Yorker cartoonist Peter Arno the father of the modern gag cartoon (as did Arno himself). Gag cartoonists of note include Charles Addams, Gary Larson, Charles Barsotti, Chon Day and Mel Calman. A Gag Cartoon is a single-panel cartoon, usually including a written caption that appears beneath the drawing. ... The three most common speech ballons (top to bottom: speech, thought, scream). ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... Peter Arno (1904 - 1968) was a U.S. cartoonist. ... Charles Samuel Addams (January 7, 1912–September 29, 1988) was an American cartoonist known for his particularly black humor and macabre characters. ... Gary Larson (b. ... Charles Barsotti is a 30-year veteran cartoonist of The New Yorker, a signature artist whose rounded, elegant, sparsely detailed style evokes both the traditional world of a Thurber and the contemporary sensibility of a Roz Chast. ... Chauncey (Chon) Day is a cartoonist whose cartoons have appeared in The New Yorker and elsewhere. ... Melville (Mel) Calman (19 May 1931, Hackney - 10 February 1994, London) was a British cartoonist best known for his little man cartoons published in British newspapers including the Daily Express (1957-63), The Sunday Telegraph (1964-65), The Observer (1965-6), The Sunday Times (1969-84) and The Times (1979...


Editorial cartoons are a type of gag cartoon found almost exclusively in news publications. Although they also employ humor, they are more serious in tone, commonly using irony or satire. The art usually acts as a visual metaphor to illustrate a point of view on current social and/or political topics. Editorial cartoons often include speech balloons and, sometimes, multiple panels. Editorial cartoonists of note include Herblock, Mike Peters, David Low and Gerald Scarfe. This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Ironic redirects here. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... An editorial cartoonist, also known as a political cartoonist, is an artist who draws cartoons that contain some level of political or social commentary. ... Herbert Lawrence Block, commonly known as Herblock (October 13, 1909 – October 7, 2001), was a U.S. editorial cartoonist. ... Mike Peters photo by Greg Preston Mike Peters is an American cartoonist. ... Sir David Alexander Cecil Low (7 April 1891–19 September 1963) was a New Zealand political cartoonist. ... Gerald Scarfe (born 1936) is a British cartoonist and illustrator whose work is characterised by an apparent obsession with the grotesque and diseased, perhaps a result of an asthmatic, bed-ridden childhood. ...


Comic strips, also known as "cartoon strips" in the United Kingdom, are found daily in newspapers worldwide, and are usually a short series of cartoon illustrations in sequence. In the United States they are not as commonly called "cartoons" themselves, but rather "comics" or "funnies". Nonetheless, the creators of comic strips—as well as comic books and graphic novels—are referred to as "cartoonists". Although humor is the most prevalent subject matter, adventure and drama are also represented in this medium. Noteworthy cartoonists in this sense include Charles Schulz, Bill Watterson, Scott Adams, Mort Walker, Steve Bell. This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ... William B. Bill Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes and a few poems (which are mostly embedded in his works). ... Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is the creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several business commentaries, social satires, and experimental philosophy books. ... Addison Morton Walker (born September 3, 1923), more popularly known as Mort Walker, is an American comic artist, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. ... Steve Bell at Dundee University Steve Bell (born February 26, 1951) is an English political cartoonist, whose work appears in The Guardian and other places. ...


Motion pictures

Main article: Animated cartoon
An animated cartoon horse, drawn by rotoscoping from Edweard Muybridge's 19th century photos.

Because of the stylistic similarities between comic strips and early animated movies, "cartoon" came to refer to animation, and this is the sense in which "cartoon" is most commonly used today. These are usually shown on television or in cinemas and are created by showing illustrated images in rapid succession to give the impression of movement. (In this meaning, the word cartoon is sometimes shortened to toon, which was popularized by the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit). Although the term can be applied to any animated presentation, it is most often used in reference to programs for children, featuring anthropomorphized animals, superheroes, the adventures of child protagonists, and other related genres. An animated cartoon is a short, hand-drawn (or made with computers to look similar to something hand-drawn) film for the cinema, television or computer screen, featuring some kind of story or plot (even if it is a very short one). ... Image File history File links Animhorse. ... Image File history File links Animhorse. ... An animated cartoon is a short, hand-drawn (or made with computers to look similar to something hand-drawn) film for the cinema, television or computer screen, featuring some kind of story or plot (even if it is a very short one). ... Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live-action film movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ... The Horse in Motion Eadweard Muybridge (April 9, 1830 – May 8, 1904) was a British-born photographer, known primarily for his early use of multiple cameras to capture motion. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 live-action/animated film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner) which blends traditional animation and live action. ... 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ...


See also

For the book of comics by Daniel Clowes, see Caricature (Daniel Clowes collection). ... The Cartoon Research Library, located on the campus of The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, is one of the foremost research libraries devoted to the collection, preservation, and study of American printed cartoon art. ... William Lyon Mackenzie King is freed from his Conscription promise by Johnny Canuck. ... This is a list of comic strips. ...

References

  1. ^ Punch.co.uk. History of the Cartoon.

External links

  • Index of cartoonists in the Fred Waring Collection
Look up Cartoon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Funny Pages - Cartoon Laws of Physics (850 words)
Cartoon Law II Any body in motion will tend to remain in motion until solid matter intervenes suddenly.
Whether shot from a cannon or in hot pursuit on foot, cartoon characters are so absolute in their momentum that only a telephone pole or an outsize boulder retards their forward motion absolutely.
Cartoon Law IV The time required for an object to fall twenty stories is greater than or equal to the time it takes for whoever knocked it off the ledge to spiral down twenty flights to attempt to capture it unbroken.
Cartoon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (771 words)
In its original historical meaning, a cartoon (from the Italian cartone, meaning "big paper") is a full-size drawing made on paper as a study for a further artwork, such as a painting or tapestry.
Cartoons were typically used in the production of frescoes, to accurately link the component parts of the composition when painted onto plaster over a series of days.
Modern gag cartoons are found in magazines and newspapers and generally consist of a single drawing with a caption immediately beneath or (less often) a speech balloon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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