FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Cart" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cart

A cart is a vehicle or device, using two wheels and normally one horse, designed for transport. A dray or wagon is a heavy transport vehicle with four wheels and normally at least two horses. Other animals such as oxen, zebu cattle or donkeys are sometimes used instead of a horse. The Trikke is a Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) This article is about the means of transport. ... The force bearing on the axle has an eccentricity e with the point of contact to the rolling surface and exerts a moment about the contact point. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... A wagon (in British English waggon) or dray is a wheeled vehicle, ordinarily with four wheels, usually pulled by an animal, or animals, such as horses, mules or oxen and used for transport of heavy goods. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (often called cows in vernacular and contemporary usage, or kye as the Scots plural of cou) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... Trinomial name Bos taurus indicus Linnaeus, 1758 Zebus (Bos taurus indicus), sometimes known as nothing cattle, are better-adapted to tropical environments than other domestic cattle. ... Binomial name Equus asinus Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Donkey (disambiguation). ...

A simple wooden cart in Australia.
A cart transporting watermelons in Harbin, China. One man sits by the shafts to ensure the horse pulls against a downward load.
A sculpture of a Hindu horsecart in Delhi, India.
A Haitian hand cart.

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 524 KB) Australian Cart File links The following pages link to this file: Cart Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Australian cart ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 524 KB) Australian Cart File links The following pages link to this file: Cart Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Australian cart ... A horsecart transporting watermelons in Harbin, China. ... A horsecart transporting watermelons in Harbin, China. ... Harbin on a map of China For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2134 KB) Description: Scupture of a Hindu Horsecart Source: photo taken by User:Deepak Date: 26th December 2006 Permission: User:Deepak released it on 27th December 2005 under CC-BY-SA-2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2134 KB) Description: Scupture of a Hindu Horsecart Source: photo taken by User:Deepak Date: 26th December 2006 Permission: User:Deepak released it on 27th December 2005 under CC-BY-SA-2. ... Hinduism (known as in some modern Indian languages[1]) is a religion that originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... Delhi   (Hindi: , Urdu: , Punjabi: ), sometimes refered to as Dilli, is the second-largest metropolis in India after Mumbai with a population of 13 million. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 633 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cart Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 633 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cart Metadata This file contains additional...

History

Carts have been mentioned in literature as far back as the second millennium B.C. The Indian sacred book Rigveda states that men and women are as equal as two wheels of a cart. Hand-carts pushed by humans have been used around the world. In the 19th century, for instance, some Mormons travelling across the plains of the United States between 1856 and 1860 used handcarts. The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A statue commemorating Mormon handcart pioneers on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah The Mormon handcart pioneers were participants in the migration of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as the Mormon or LDS Church) to Salt Lake City, Utah who used handcarts to... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


Carts were often used for judicial punishments, both to transport the condemned – a public humiliation in itself (in Ancient Rome defeated leaders were often carried in the victorious general's triumph) – and even, in England until its substitution by the whipping post under Queen Elizabeth I, to tie the condemned to the cart-tail and administer him or her a public whipping. Public humiliation was often used by local communities to punish minor and petty criminals before the age of large, modern prisons (imprisonment was long unusual as a punishment, rather a method of coercion). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... It has been suggested that Pranger be merged into this article or section. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


Types of carts

Perhaps the most common example today is the shopping cart (British English: shopping trolley), which has also come to have a metaphorical meaning in relation to online purchases (here, British English uses the metaphor of the shopping basket). Shopping carts first made their appearance in Oklahoma City in 1937. A row of parked (and very colorful) shopping carts equipped with a coin-operated antitheft mechanism. ... British English (BrE) is a broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere. ... Look up metaphor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Four styles of household basket. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The golf cart, designed to carry golfers and their clubs around a golf course faster and with less effort than walking, is another well known modern type of cart – in this case, self-propelled. Golf carts A golf cart, also known as a golf car, is a small vehicle designed originally to carry two golfers and their golf clubs around a golf course faster and with less effort than walking. ...


A Porter's trolley is a type of small, hand-propelled wheeled platform. This can also be called a baggage cart. A porter carries objects. ... Small Baggage cart Cart mule Baggage carts or Trolleys are small vehicles pushed by travellers (human-powered) to carry individual luggage, mostly suitcases. ...


Larger carts may be drawn by animals, such as horses, mules, or oxen. They have been in continuous use since the invention of the wheel, in the 5th millennium BC. Carts may be named for the animal that pulls them, such as horsecarts or oxcarts. In modern times, horsecarts are used in competition while draft horse showing. A dogcart, however, is usually a cart designed to carry hunting dogs: an open cart with two cross-seats back to back; the dogs could be penned between the rear-facing seat and the back end. Animalia redirects here. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... A barren of mules. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (often called cows in vernacular and contemporary usage, or kye as the Scots plural of cou) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... // Events 4860 BC - Mount Mazama in Oregon collapses, forming a caldera that later fills with water and becomes Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States. ... Percheron Ladies Cart Draft horse showing is a competitive sport in North America where exhibitors present their draft horse(s) to be judged in harness, pulling various types of carts and wagons. ... A hunting dog refers to any dog who assists humans in hunting, or whose breed was originally developed to do so. ...


An animal-drawn cart can bear the archaic name of wain (from the Old English and German root-word for wagon), for example a haywain, and the builders of such vehicles became known as "cartwrights" or "wainwrights". These terms survive as surnames of families descended from those practising these trades; also note the surname "Carter". In language, an archaism is the deliberate use of an older form that has fallen out of current use. ... A wain is a type of horse-drawn, load-carrying vehicle, used for agricultural purposes rather than transporting people, for example a haywain. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... A wagon (in British English waggon) or dray is a wheeled vehicle, ordinarily with four wheels, usually pulled by an animal, or animals, such as horses, mules or oxen and used for transport of heavy goods. ...


Carts have many different shapes but the basic idea of transporting material (or maintaining a collection of materials in a portable fashion) remains. Carts usually have two or four wheels. Those with four wheels (drays or wagons) will often have a pivoting front axle that has a pole connected to the collars or yoke of the two guiding draught animals. The traces from the draught animals are connected to the pivoting axle and then, by chain, to the rear axle. Two-wheeled carts normally have shafts, one along each side of the draught animal that supports the forward-balanced load in the cart. The shafts are supported by a saddle on the horse. The draught traces attach to the axle of the vehicle. In all cases the traces are attached to a collar (on horses), to a yoke (on other heavy draught animals) or to a harness on dogs or other light animals. One-horse carts are common, on the other hand drays are pulled by many animals, as many as 8 or 10 depending on what is being hauled. A wagon (in British English waggon) or dray is a wheeled vehicle, ordinarily with four wheels, usually pulled by an animal, or animals, such as horses, mules or oxen and used for transport of heavy goods. ... The collar on a draught animal is a robustly constructed leather and straw device that is intended to sit comfortably on the animals shoulders around its neck and support a set of hames that transfer the draught forces from the animal to the traces. ... Agriculture Oxes wearing yokes A yoke is a shaped wooden crosspiece bound to the necks of a pair of oxen, occasionally horses. ... In transport, a trace is one of two, or more, straps, ropes or chains by which a carriage or wagon, or the like, is drawn by a harness horse or other draught animal. ... Note: A cart may also be short for cartridge, particularly in the radio industry, where 8-track cartridges (and later CDs and zip drives) were used. ...


Traces are made from a range of materials depending on the load and frequency of use. Heavy draught traces are made from iron or steel chain. Lighter traces are often leather and sometimes hemp rope, but plaited horse-hair and other similar decorative materials can be used. General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... The steel cable of a colliery winding tower. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ...


The dray is often associated with the transport of barrels, particularly of beer. Traditional wooden barrels in Cutchogue Modern aluminium beer barrels - also called casks - outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England A barrel or cask is a hollow cylindrical container, traditionally made of wood staves and bound with iron hoops. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


The term "Go-Kart", which exists since 1959, also shortened as "Kart", an alternative spelling of "cart", refers to a tiny race car with frame and two-stroke engine; the old term go-cart originally meant a sedan chair or an infant walker since the 17th century. A kart racer takes a turn on an indoor track Kart racing (as the word is so spelled by enthusiasts) or karting is a variant of open-wheeler motor sport with simple, small four-wheeled vehicles called karts, go-karts, or gearbox/shifter karts depending on the design. ... A kart racer takes a turn on an indoor track Kart racing (as the word is so spelled by enthusiasts) or karting is a variant of open-wheeler motor sport with simple, small four-wheeled vehicles called karts, go-karts, or gearbox/shifter karts depending on the design. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... The two-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine differs from the more common four-stroke cycle by having only two strokes (linear movements of the piston) instead of four, although the same four operations (intake, compression, power, exhaust) still occur. ... A Sedan chair, revived at the Turkish Village of the Worlds Columbian Exposition, 1893 A Sedan chair is an enclosed windowed chair with an upholstered interior suitable for a single occupant, which was carried by two porters, one in front, one behind, using wooden rails that passed through metal...


A soap-box cart (also known as a Billy Cart, Go-Cart, Trolley etc.) is a popular children's construction project on wheels, usually pedaled, but also intended for a test race. A soapbox car is a motor-less vehicle capable of holding a driver (usually a child) built for the purpose of racing. ...


In popular culture

Directed by James Cruze J. Warren Kerrigan with Lois Wilson on set of The Covered Wagon The Covered Wagon is a 1923 American silent Western feature film released by Paramount Pictures. ... Justus D. Barnes, from The Great Train Robbery The Western is one of the classic American literary and film genres. ... Official language(s) none Capital Topeka,Kandickass Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Richard Littlejohn Richard Littlejohn (born 18 January 1954 in Ilford, Essex) is a right-wing British newspaper columnist. ...

Gallery

See also


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m