FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Carousel (musical)

Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnar's play Liliom. The original production, which was directed by Rouben Mamoulian, opened at Broadway's Majestic Theatre on April 19, 1945 and closed on May 24, 1947 after playing 890 performances. The original cast included John Raitt, Jan Clayton, Jean Darling, Eric Mattson, Christine Johnson, Murvyn Vye, Bambi Linn, and Russell Collins. 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Ferenc Molnár (b. ... Liliom is a 1909 play by Ferenc Molnár, famous as the basis for the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel. ... Rouben Mamoulian (October 8, 1897 – December 4, 1987) was an American film and theatre director. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre on 247 West 44th Street in Manhattan, New York City. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... John Emmett Raitt (January 19, 1917, Santa Ana, California, USA - February 20, 2005, Pacific Palisades, California) was a star of the musical theater stage. ... Jan Clayton (b. ... Jean Darling (born Dorothy Jean LeVake on August 23, 1922) is a former American child actress who was regular in the Our Gang short subjects series from 1927 to 1929. ... Bambi Linn, born on April 26, 1926 in Brooklyn, New York, is an American dancer, choreographer, and actress. ...


The play was adapted into a film in 1956. A remake starring Hugh Jackman has been announced as in production. Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hugh Michael Jackman (born October 12, 1968) is an Australian film producer, film and stage actor, known for playing Wolverine in X-Men and its sequels, and his Tony Award-winning performance in The Boy from Oz. ...

Contents

Plot synopsis

Act I

Two young millworkers in freshly industrialized 1870s New England visit the town's carousel after work. One of them — demure Julie Jordan — shares a lingering glance and is flirted with by the carousel's barker, Billy Bigelow. (instrumental piece: "Carousel Waltz")


Mrs. Mullin, the owner of the carousel, arrives and tells Julie never to return to the because she let Billy put his arm around her during the ride. Julie's friend, Carrie Pipperidge, and Julie argue back until Billy arrives. Billy initially sides with Mrs Mullin (who flirts with him outrageously) until he realises that Mrs Mullin is just jealous of Julie, at which point he swaps sides and is fired from his job.


Carrie presses Julie for information about the carousel ride with Billy, but Julie is reticent about the encounter. (song: "You're a Queer One, Julie Jordan") Eventually satisfied, Carrie confides that she has a beau of her own: local fisherman Enoch Snow (song: "Mister Snow").


Billy returns and makes it clear that only Julie should stay with him. Carrie eventually leaves after revealing that if either of them stay out, they will lose their jobs at Bascombe's mill. Mr. Bascombe himself and a policeman appear and warn Julie that Billy has taken money from other women. Bascombe offers to take Julie home so that she can keep her job, but she refuses. She and Billy, now alone, can talk freely, but neither can quite confess the growing attraction they feel for each other. ("Bench Scene" and song: "If I Loved You") If I Loved You is a popular song. ...


It is now a month later, and sailors appear at a Spa owned by Julie's cousin, Nettie Fowler, with clams for the evening's clambake. They are very noisy, which spurs Carrie and the other female townfolk to jeer at them (this section is sung as a sort of recitative, rather than spoken). Nettie arrives and, spotting the sexual tension, leads them all in a celebration of love and Spring accompanied by an elaborate dance (song: "June Is Bustin' Out All Over"). The men leave as Julie arrives, now married to Billy, but he has been missing all night with his whaler friend Jigger Craigin. Nettie tells Carrie to comfort Julie and tries to get the other girls to clean up to stop them eavesdropping, but to no avail. Julie confides in Carrie that Billy, now unemployed and living with Julie at Nettie's, is unhappy over the loss of her job and has slapped Julie out of frustration. Carrie also has happier news — she and Enoch are to be married. At this, the girls who have so far been feigning work, rush over to congratulate her and imagine the wedding day (song: "Mister Snow reprise") During this, Enoch has arrived and startles the girls by joining in the final verse. The girls leave Julie, Carrie and Enoch alone.


Carrie tries to make conversation between Julie and Enoch, but the situation becomes awkward because of Julie's unhappiness, and eventually she bursts into tears in Enoch's arms. As she pulls herself together Billy arrives with Jigger. He is openly rude to Enoch and then Julie, and he soon leaves along with Jigger followed by a distraught Julie. Left alone, Carrie and Enoch extoll the virtues of a life plan and Enoch reveals how he will become rich selling canned sardines and plans to have a large family with Carrie (song: "When The Children Are Asleep").


Meanwhile, Billy, Jigger and other whalers sing of life on the sea (song: "Blow High, Blow Low") which segues into a dance with the local girls flirting with the whalers. Jigger tries to recruit Billy to help with a robbery but Billy declines when Jigger tells him that the victim might have to be killed. Mrs Mullin arrives and tries to tempt Billy back to the carousel (and to her) and he reveals he is unhappy with Julie. Julie arrives and there is almost an argument, but Mrs Mullin leaves to go to the bank. Julie tells Billy of her pregnancy and they go inside. Mrs. Mullin and Jigger return and spar, until Billy comes back out and tells Mrs Mullin to leave. Overwhelmed with happiness by the news, and determined to provide for his future child, Billy decides to be Jigger's accomplice after all (song: "Soliloquy").


Act 1 ends with the whole town leaving for the clambake. Billy, who previously shunned the idea of going to the clambake, now realises it is integral to his and Jigger's alibi, and so decides to go too. Julie is delighted.


Act II

The act begins with the town reminiscing about the huge meal that they have just eaten (song: "A Real Nice Clambake"). As everyone leaves to help clear up before the treasure hunt, Jigger tries to seduce Carrie. Unfortunately Enoch walks in whilst Carrie is in a compromising position, and declares that he is finished with her (song: "Geraniums In The Winder"), as Jigger jeers (song: "Stonecutters Cut It On Stone") The girls try to comfort Carrie, saying that all men are bad, and ask Julie to do the same. Instead Julie tells them that you should stand by your man through thick and thin (song: "What's The Use Of Wondrin'?"). She sees Billy trying to sneak away with Jigger, and while trying to stop him, feels the knife hidden in his shirt. She begs him to give it to her, but he refuses and leaves to commit the robbery. Julie knows nothing about the crime, but realizes that Billy is about to do something that may get him in trouble.


Jigger and Billy play at cards, with the stakes being shares of the forecasted robbery spoils. Soon Billy has lost his much of his stake in the robbery, thus making it pointless on his behalf. Mr. Bascombe, the robbery victim appears, but has already deposited the money and instead has a gun. The robbery is aborted; Bascombe shoots after Jigger but he escapes while Billy is cornered by the police. Billy stabs himself with his knife and dies; Julie arrives too late to save him.


Carrie tells Julie that Billy's death is not necessarily a bad thing. Enoch gets back together with Carrie and backs up this view. Mrs Mullin arrives much to the disgust of the townfolk, but Julie lets her view the body. Mrs. Mullin does so, and runs off, weeping. Everyone leaves except Julie, and Nettie who comforts Julie (song: "You'll Never Walk Alone"). Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ...


We follow Billy to heaven. There, a pair of blunt-spoken angels explain that he must attempt to solve the problems he left behind. Billy refuses to see a simple magistrate in Heaven, and demands to be taken directly to God to be judged (song: "The Highest Judge Of All"). The Starkeeper sends him back down to earth, fifteen years after his suicide. He steals a star on the way. His and Julie's daughter, Louise, is now an angry and rebellious teen mocked by Mr. Snow's snobbish and wealthy children because her father was a thief (instrumental: "Louise's Ballet").


Enoch and his children stop by Julie's house to pick up Carrie on the way to the graduation, and Enoch's son (Enoch Jr.) waits behind to talk to Louise. Louise reveals she will run away from home with the carnival troupe she met during the ballet, but Enoch Jr. proposes that she marry him so that she doesn't go. However he reveals that his father would not think Louise an appropriate match. Insulted, Louise orders him to leave and bursts into tears.


Billy reveals himself to Louise, pretending to be a friend of her father. He tries to cheer her up and give her a small gift — the star he stole from Heaven. She refuses it, and in frustration, he slaps her. As he makes himself invisible, Louise tells Julie what has happened, and reveals that the slap miraculously felt like a kiss, not like a blow. Without allowing her to actually see him, Billy finally confesses his love to Julie (song: "If I Loved You reprise"). Having thus made amends, he is there for Louise's high-school graduation at which the whole town shuns her and refuses to applaud. Dr. Seldon, who strangely resembles the Starkeeper, tells the graduating class not to rely on their parents' success (directed at Enoch Jr.) or be held back by their parents' mistakes (directed at Louise). Dr Seldon then leads everyone in a final chorus (song: "You'll Never Walk Alone reprise"), where, still invisible, Billy urges Louise to have confidence in herself. Although she does not hear him, she responds and, along with Julie, joins in the song. Through this good deed, Billy is redeemed and wins entry to Heaven.


(This final scene is a complete departure from Molnar's Liliom, in which Liliom is supposedly sent to Hell after slapping his daughter, despite the fact that in the Molnar play the slap also felt like a kiss). Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is a place or a state of pain and suffering. ...


History

Both Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II said that Carousel was the favorite of their works together. They broke new ground in musical theater storytelling with their extended music/dialogue scenes, such as the "bench scene", which feaures "If I Loved You", and, hauntingly, the "Soliloquy" in which Billy imagines his future child. The bench scene, especially, used singing as if it were spoken dialogue set to music (much as in opera recitative, and in this scene, the "recitative" singing leads up to the actual song). The final anthem "You'll Never Walk Alone" has taken on a life of its own; a graduation standard, it is also customarily sung by fans of British football matches, especially by fans of Liverpool and Celtic. An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Recitative, a form of composition often used in operas, oratorios, cantatas and similar works, is described as a melodic speech set to music, or a descriptive narrative song in which the music follows the words. ... Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Liverpool Football Club are a football club based in Liverpool, in the north west of England. ... Celtic Football Club (pronounced seltik, in IPA) AIM: CCP is a Scottish football club, competing in the Scottish Premier League, the highest form of competition in Scotland. ...


A 1956 movie version starred Shirley Jones and Gordon MacRae. This movie also had an uncredited appearance by a young Cheryl Holdridge, who would later gain fame on the Mickey Mouse Club, as well as an appearance by Jacques d'Amboise, a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet, as the charismatic carousel barker in the ballet. 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shirley Jones, in a still from the opening credits of The Partridge Family Shirley Mae Jones (born March 31, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning singer and actress, perhaps best known for her role as Shirley Partridge, the widowed mother of five children, in the television series The Partridge Family... Albert Gordon MacRae (born 12 March 1921 in East Orange, New Jersey, – died 24 January 1986 in Lincoln, Nebraska) was an American actor and singer, best known for his appearances in musical films of the 1950s. ... Cheryl Holdridge (born June 20, 1944 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a United States actress. ... The Mickey Mouse Club was a long-running American variety television series that began in the 1950s, produced and televised by Walt Disney Productions and featuring a regular but ever-changing cast of teenage performers. ... Jacques dAmboise (born July 28, 1934) is a well-known U.S. ballet dancer and choreographer. ... Logo of the New York City Ballet The New York City Ballet is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein originally known as the American Ballet. ... Act 4 of Swan Lake: choreography by Petipa and Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky. ...


Themes and Issues

Carousel was an opportunity for Oscar Hammerstein II, a liberal, to explore attitudes of society and prejudice in a musical play. The main themes of Carousel are social class and conduct; Julie and Billy are both working class, whereas Enoch and (ultimately) Carrie are middle class, and the differences between these two families are touched on during the second act. The ultimate conclusion is that anybody can go far, no matter what his or her class, and that everybody, even a rough fairground worker who beats his wife, can be redeemed. For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ...


Musical Numbers

ACT ONE

Prologue. An Amusement Park on the New England Coast

  • "The Carousel Waltz"

Scene One. A Tree-lined Path Along the Shore

  • "You're a Queer One, Julie Jordan" (omitted from the 1956 film, but included on the film's soundtrack album)
  • "Mister Snow"
  • "If I Loved You"

Scene Two. Nettie Fowler's Spa on the Ocean Front

  • "June Is Bustin' Out All Over"
  • "Mister Snow (reprise)" (omitted from the 1956 film)
  • "When the Children Are Asleep"
  • "Blow High, Blow Low" (omitted from the 1956 film, but included on the film's soundtrack album)
  • "Soliloquy"
  • "Act I Finale" (omitted from the 1956 film) (reprise of "June Is Bustin' Out All Over")
ACT TWO
  • "Entr'acte" (omitted from the 1956 film)

Scene One. On an Island Across the Bay

  • "A Real Nice Clambake"
  • "Geraniums in the Winder" (omitted from the 1956 film)
  • "Stonecutters Cut It On Stone"
  • "What's the Use of Wond'rin'?"

Scene Two. Mainland Waterfront

Scene Three. Up There in Heaven Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ...

  • "The Highest Judge of All" (omitted from the 1956 film)

Scene Four. Down Here on a Beach

  • "Ballet"

Scene Five. Outside Julie's Cottage

  • "If I Loved You (reprise)"

Scene Six. Outside the Schoolhouse

  • "Finale Ultimo: You'll Never Walk Alone (reprise)"
  • "Exit Music" (omitted from the 1956 film)

1956 Film Version

The film version, released in 1956 by 20th Century Fox, starred Gordon MacRae as Billy and Shirley Jones as Julie. It was produced in Cinemascope 55, and also featured Cameron Mitchell (in his only singing role) as Jigger Craigin, Barbara Ruick as Carrie, opera stars Claramae Turner and Robert Rounseville as Nettie and Mr. Snow, respectively, Gene Lockhart as the Starkeeper, and Susan Luckey as Louise. The film followed the stage version faithfully, except for four major changes - Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... Albert Gordon MacRae (born 12 March 1921 in East Orange, New Jersey, – died 24 January 1986 in Lincoln, Nebraska) was an American actor and singer, best known for his appearances in musical films of the 1950s. ... Shirley Jones, in a still from the opening credits of The Partridge Family Shirley Mae Jones (born March 31, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning singer and actress, perhaps best known for her role as Shirley Partridge, the widowed mother of five children, in the television series The Partridge Family... The CinemaScope 55 title screen that followed the Fox logo A frame of the negative of Carousel. CinemaScope 55 was a large-format version of CinemaScope introduced in 1955, which used a negative size of 55. ... The name Cameron Mitchell belongs to: The film actor Cameron Mitchell, who appeared in both highly acclaimed movies (the 1951 adaptation of Death of a Salesman) and critically panned movies (Space Mutiny, Frankenstein Island). ... Barbara Ruick (born: December 23, 1930 died: March 3, 1974) was an American actress. ... Claramae Turner (1920-) is an American opera singer. ... Robert Rounseville (1914-1974) was an American tenor, who appeared in opera, operetta, and Broadway musicals. ... Gene Lockhart (1891 - 1957) was a Canadian character actor, singer and popular composer. ...

  • In the film, Billy dies by accident rather than by suicide — when he falls on his own knife while trying to escape arrest.
  • Some of the "recitative" singing in the 'bench scene" is turned into spoken dialogue.
  • The "recitative" singing that leads directly into the song June Is Bustin' Out All Over is eliminated.
  • The story of Billy's life on Earth is made into a flashback that takes up three-quarters of the film, with Billy telling his story to the Starkeeper while awaiting permission to return to Earth for one day.

This last change was made to safeguard against the movie audience's being surprised at the death of Billy, and to prevent their leaving after Billy's death lest they think the story ended at that point.


A small, less important change was the switching of the song "When The Children Are Asleep" to a later moment in order to take full advantage of the Maine locale. In the film, it is sung in a new scene by Carrie and Mr. Snow in their boat as the couple, together with Julie and Billy, sail to the island for the clambake. (This would logically place the song between Acts I and II of the stage version.) In the stage version, the song is unheard by any of the other characters, but the film places it so that Julie and Billy are there to listen to the song.


The film was largely critically acclaimed, but was a box office flop. Its soundtrack album, however, sold well, and the film's exposure on television, VHS, and DVD, has won a larger audience for it. It was, unfortunately, the only Rodgers and Hammerstein film not nominated for any Academy Awards. However, some of the technical staff of Carousel also worked that year on the film version of The King and I, for which they did receive Oscars. As a result, they did not go home empty-handed on Oscar night. The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ...


External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Carousel

  Results from FactBites:
 
Valentine Musical Carousel, Carousel Music Boxes & Musical Merry Go Rounds (103 words)
A beautiful hand painted carousel music box finished in pastel shades of pink, green and gold highlights.
Three pretty little horses gently go round as the music plays.
They are made of a fragile moulded resin and contain small parts.
Jerry Orbach - Music Downloads - Online (858 words)
Bio: Actor/singer Jerry Orbach spent 20 years working primarily as a leading man in Broadway musical comedies, a career that netted him a Tony Award and appearances on eight cast albums, before devoting himself more to non-singing character roles in films and a part on a long-running TV series.
His performance in Guys and Dolls earned him his first Tony Award nomination as a supporting actor in a musical, but that show was the only one of the four not to produce a cast album.
He originated his second starring role in a Broadway musical in Promises, Promises (December 1, 1968), singing the title song and the standard "Ill Never Fall in Love Again." The show ran 1,281 performances and produced a charting cast album; Orbach won the Tony Award for leading actor in a musical.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m