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Encyclopedia > Carolingian
Carolingian dynasty
Pippinids
Arnulfings
Carolingians
After the Treaty of Verdun (843)
Also see: France in the Middle Ages.

The Carolingian Dynasty (known variously as the Carlovingians or Karlings) was a dynasty of rulers who began as mayors of the palaces and eventually became kings of the Franks (751). It is perhaps most noteworthy as the dynasty which resurrected in fact the idea of an emperor in the West. The Carolingians succeeded the Merovingian Dynasty and continued to rule in France until 987 when Louis V died. The name Carolingian itself comes from Charlemagne, or Charles the Great (in Latin, Carolus Magnus), who was crowned emperor in 800 and is the dynasty's most prominent member. The last Carolingian emperor died in 899 before the title had been in the family for a century. The Carolingian downfall was faster than its rise. Pippinid are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose eldest scion served as major-domo, de facto ruler, of the Frankish Kingdom nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Pippin of Landen, also known as Pippin the Elder (580 - 640), was the Frankish Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia under the Merovingian kings Clotaire II, Dagobert I and Sigebert III from 615 or 623 to 629. ... Grimoald the Elder or Grimaud (d. ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as major-domos, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustra and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Arnulf of Metz (August 13, 582 – August 16, 640) was a Frankish noble who had great influence in the Merovingian kingdoms as a bishop and was later canonized as a saint. ... Chlodulf was bishop of Metz approximately from 657 to 697. ... Ansegisel, or Duke Angiese, was the son of Arnulf of Metz and his wife Doda. ... Pippin of Herstal (or Pepin; Pépin), also known as Pippin the Middle, Pippin the Younger (as with his grandson), or Pippin II, (635 or 640–December 16, 714, Jupille) was the grandson of Pippin (I) the Elder through the marriage of Ansegisel and Begga, the daughter of the Elder. ... Grimoald II (d. ... Drogo (670-708), son of Pepin the Middle and Plectrude, was the duke of Champagne by appointment of his father in 690 and duke of Burgundy from the death of Nordebert in 697. ... Theudoald or Theodald was the mayor of the palace, briefly unopposed in 714 until Ragenfrid was acclaimed in Neustria and Charles Martel in Austrasia by the nobles, after the death of his grandfather, Pepin of Heristal. ... The Carolingians were a dynasty of rulers that eventually controlled the Frankish realm and its successors from the 8th to the 10th century, officially taking over the kingdom from the Merovingian dynasty in 751. ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Carloman (716–754) was the son of Charles Martel, major domo or Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia and Chrotrud. ... Pippin the Younger Pippin the Younger or Pepin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short or the ordinal Pippin III, was the king of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ... Carloman (751 - December 4, 771) was a King of the Franks (768 - 771). ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Divisions of the Treaty of Verdun. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... Middle Francia describes the realm created for Emperor Lothair I, wedged between East Francia and West Francia. ... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ... The Frankish Empire after the treaties of Verdun and Meerssen. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... East Francia was the land of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843, which divided the Carolingian Empire of the Franks. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... The mayors of the palaces were the chief officials of the Merovingian kings. ... The following list of Frankish Kings is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ... The Western Roman Empire is the name given to the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian. ... For other uses of the term Merovingian, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Events Hugh Capet, Count of Paris, crowned King of France Kukulcan conquers Chichen Itza Births Deaths May 21 King Louis V of France Categories: 987 ... King Louis V of France (ca. ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Events December 25, Rome, coronation of Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor by Pope Leo III. Celtic monks begin work on the Book of Kells on the Island of Iona. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ...


The dynasty is usually considered to have been founded by Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz in the early seventh century, who wielded a great deal of power and influence in the Merovingian kingdoms. His son Ansegisel married Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen, and their son was Pepin of Heristal. It is from Pepin's grandfathers that the dynasty receives its earlier (pre-Martel) names: Arnulfing or Pippinid. The mayorlty of the palace of the kingdom of Austrasia began in the family with Ansegisel and continued with Pepin of Heristal. Pepin conquered Neustria at the Battle of Tertry in 687 and spread Arnulfing authority over all the Franks. Pepin was succeeded by his son, Charles Martel, as mayor, who in turn was the father of Pepin the Short. By this time the Merovingian rois fainéants (do-nothing kings) had no power which the mayors had not already taken in the preceding century of minorities, regencies, and civil wars. Pepin was crowned king in 751 with the support of the leading Frankish nobles and Pope Zachary, after the last Merovingian king, Childeric III was deposed, tonsured, and put up in a monastery. Charlemagne, Pepin's son, became king of the Franks in 768 and was crowned emperor by Pope Leo III in 800. His son, Louis the Pious, was his sole successor, but upon Louis death and the end of his unrestful reign followed three years of civil war between his sons: Lothair, Louis the German, and Charles the Bald. Arnulf of Metz (August 13, 582 – August 16, 640) was a Frankish noble who had great influence in the Merovingian kingdoms as a bishop and was later canonized as a saint. ... Two bishops assist at the Exhumation of Saint Hubert, who was a bishop too, at the église Saint-Pierre in Liège. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... ( 6th century - 7th century - 8th century - other centuries) Events Islam starts in Arabia, the Quran is written, and Arabs subjugate Syria, Iraq, Persia, Egypt, North Africa and Central Asia to Islam. ... Ansegisel, or Duke Angiese, was the son of Arnulf of Metz and his wife Doda. ... Begga (or Begue) (d. ... Saint Pepin of Landen, also known as Pepin the Elder (b. ... Pippin of Herstal ( Pépin), also known as Pippin the Middle, (b. ... The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as major-domos, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustra and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Pippinid are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose eldest scion served as major-domo, de facto ruler, of the Frankish Kingdom nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Mayor of the Palace was an early medieval title and office, also known by the Latin name, maior domus, used most notably in the Frankish kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries. ... Austrasia & Neustria Austrasia formed the north-eastern portion of the Kingdom of the Merovingian Franks, comprising parts of the territory of present-day eastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. ... Neustria & Austrasia The territory of Neustria originated in A.D. 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. ... The Battle of Tertry was an important engagement in Merovingian Gaul between the forces of Austrasia on one side and those of Neustria and Burgundy on the other. ... Events: December 15 - Sergius succeeds Conon as Pope King Theuderic III of Neustria is defeated by Pepin of Herstal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia. ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... Pope Zachary (in Greek : Zacharias), pope (741-752), from a Greek family of Calabria, appears to have been on intimate terms with Gregory III, whom he succeeded (November 741). ... Childeric III (died about 754), called either the Idiot or the Phantom King, king of the Franks, was the fourteenth and last king of the Merovingian dynasty. ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Events Charles (Charlemagne) and Carloman divide the Frankish kingdom after the death of their father Pippin the Short. ... Leo III (died June 12, 816) was Pope from 795 to 816. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ...


After the division of the empire between the three grandsons of Charlemagne with the Treaty of Verdun in 843, the Carolingians initially continued to hold the throne in all three sections that were created: West Francia, Middle Francia, and East Francia. Divisions of the Treaty of Verdun. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... Western Francia was the land under the control of Charles the Bald after the Treaty of Verdun of 843, which divided the Carolingian Empire of the Franks into an East, West, and Middle. ... Middle Francia describes the realm created for Emperor Lothair I, wedged between East Francia and West Francia. ... Eastern Francia were the lands of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843. ...

  • In the West, which was the nucleus of later France, they continued to be the ruling dynasty until the Capetians, perhaps descendants on the distaff side of Louis the Pious, ascended the throne in 987.
  • In the Middle, with the empty title of Emperor and that which would be the kingdoms of Lotharingia and Provence, as well as the Iron Crown of Lombardy (Italy), the major branch of the family ruled till 875, but further division occurred with the Treaty of Mersen in 870.
  • In the East, the kernel of later Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, the Carolingians ruled until 911, the death of Louis the Child. Here, the dukes of the stem duchies eventually acclaimed a Saxon dynasty, commonly referred to as the Ottonians, who consciously modelled themselves as Carolingian successors.

The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur. ... The Iron Crown of Lombardy (Corona Ferrea) is both a reliquary and one of the most ancient royal insignia of Europe. ... Events December 29 - Charles the Bald, king of west Danes capture Lindisfarne and arrive in Cambridge. ... The Treaty of Mersen (870 AD) was an agreement of the division of the Carolingian Empire by the sons of Louis I, Charles II of the West Franks (France) and Louis the German of East Franks (Germany), signed at the town of Meerssen, which is now in the Netherlands. ... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... The double-headed eagle A portrait of Charlemagne wearing the crown of the Holy Roman Empire (15th century painting by Albrecht Dürer) The Holy Roman Empire was a mainly Germanic conglomeration of lands in Central Europe during the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... Events Autumn - Charles the Simple argees to the Treaty of St. ... This title could also refer to Louis of Sicily. ... During the Early Middle Ages, the stem duchies formed the major divisions of the eastern Carolingian kingdom (roughly the region of modern Germany). ... Map showing the Saxons homeland in traditional region bounded by the three rivers: Weser, Eider, and Elbe Src: Freemans Historical Geographys. The Saxons or Saxon people are (nowadays) part of the German people with its main areas of settlements in the German States of Schleswig-Holstein, Lower Saxony, Saxony... Ottonian dynasty is a name sometimes given to a ruling dynasty of German kings, sometimes regarded as the first dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire, (though Charlemagne is commonly viewed as the original founder. ...

See also

For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... The following list of Frankish Kings is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later... The following list of German monarchs is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... The following list of Holy Roman Emperors is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... This is the Kings of France family tree, including all kings, from Charles Magne to the advent of the Republic. ... Example from 10th century manuscript Carolingian or Caroline minuscule is a script developed as a writing standard in Europe so that the Roman alphabet could be easily recognized by the small literate class from one region to another. ... Sample of Carolingian minuscule, one of the products of the Carolingian Renaissance. ...

External Links

  • Columbia Encyclopedia entry

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History of Art: From Carolingian to Romanesque A (1171 words)
The history of the Carolingian dynasty is inextricably linked to the evolution of early medieval civilization in western Europe.
The most important innovations of Carolingian church architecture were clearly influenced by the idea of joining church and empire in a single enterprise.
Indeed, Charlemagne's decision to restore the imagery of the Roman Empire at all levels was a striking feature of the was a striking feature of the new culture, and several works attest to the way in which classical forms permeated the new religious and imperial ideals.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Carolingian Schools (2107 words)
Later, as Archbishop of Mainz, he continued to sustain the programme of the Carolingian revival, and by his efforts for the improvement of popular preaching, and by his advocacy of the use of the vernacular tongue, earned the title of the "Teacher of Germany".
Carolingian schools was maintained by the proscholus, and that the medieval scholar dreaded the rod is clear from an episode in the history of the school of
Thus the educational influence of the Carolingian revival of learning was continued in some way down to the dawn of the era of university education in the thirteenth century.
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