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Encyclopedia > Carnivore
Lions are voracious carnivores; they can require up to seven kilograms (15 lbs) of meat per day. Large mammals, like this African Buffalo, comprise an important part of their diet.

A carnivore (IPA: /ˈkɑrnɪvɔər/), meaning 'meat eater' (Latin carne meaning 'flesh' and vorare meaning 'to devour'), is an animal with a diet consisting mainly of meat, whether it comes from animals living (predation) or dead (scavenging). Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The Zero-Carb diet has recently gained popularity as a more extreme version of the famous low-carb diet. ... A carnivore is an animal that eats a diet consisting only of meat. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Binomial name Syncerus caffer (Sparrman, 1779) Subspecies The African Buffalo or Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a bovid from the family of the Bovidae. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... In nutrition, the diet is the sum of food consumed by a person or other organism. ... For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ... Predator and Prey redirect here. ... For a person who scavenges, see Waste picker. ...


In a more general sense, animals are loosely considered carnivores if their feeding behaviour consists of preying on other animals rather than grazing on plants. There are many predatory invertebrates, for example arthropods such as spiders or mantises and various species of predatory land snails and sea snails. This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Invertebrate is a term coined by Chevalier de Lamarck to describe any animal without a backbone or vertebra, like insects, squids and worms. ... Subphyla and Classes Subphylum Trilobitomorpha Trilobita - Trilobites (extinct) Subphylum Chelicerata Arachnida - Spiders, Scorpions, etc. ... For other uses, see Spider (disambiguation). ... Mantis is Greek for prophet. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... For other uses, see Snail (disambiguation). ...


Animals that subsist on a diet consisting only of meat are referred to as obligate carnivores.


Plants that capture and digest insects are called carnivorous plants. Similarly fungi that capture microscopic animals are often called carnivorous fungi. A pitcher plant in flower, growing on a road cut in Palau A carnivorous plant is a plant that derives some or most of its nutrients (but not energy) by trapping and consuming animals, especially insects. ... Carnivorous fungi are fungi that derive some or most of their nutrients from trapping and digesting microscopic or other minute animals. ...


The designation "hypercarnivore" is used to describe animals that exclusively feed on animal tissue. Additionally, it is used in paleobiology to describe taxa of animals which have an increased slicing component of their dentition relative to the grinding component.[1] A hypercarnivore, as opposed to a hypocarnivore, is an animal that exclusively eats meat and nothing else. ... Paleobiology (sometimes spelled palaeobiology) is a growing and comparatively new discipline which combines the methods and findings of the natural science biology with the methods and findings of the earth science paleontology. ... A taxon (plural taxa), or taxonomic unit, is a grouping of organisms (named or unnamed). ... Dentition is the development of teeth and their arrangement in the mouth. ...

Contents

Classification

Carnivores that eat insects and similar invertebrates primarily or exclusively are called insectivores, while those that eat fish primarily or exclusively are called piscivores. Carnivory that entails the consumption of members of an organism's own species is referred to as cannibalism. This includes sexual cannibalism and cannibalistic infanticide. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1527x1670, 761 KB) Summary Description: The trap of a Venus fly trap, showing trigger hairs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1527x1670, 761 KB) Summary Description: The trap of a Venus fly trap, showing trigger hairs. ... For other uses, see Venus Flytrap (disambiguation). ... Nepenthes mirabilis in flower, growing on a road cut in Palau Carnivorous plants (sometimes called insectivorous plants) are plants that derive some or most of their nutrients (but not energy) from trapping and consuming animals or protozoans, most focusing on insects and other arthropods. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Any organism with a diet that consists chiefly of insects and similar small creatures is an insectivore. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Three Mormon crickets eating a fourth Mormon cricket In zoology, cannibalism is a common ecological interaction in the animal kingdom and has been recorded for more than 1500 species (this estimate is from 1981, and likely a gross underestimation). ... Sexual cannibalism is a special case of cannibalism in which a female organism kills and consumes male of the same species before, during, or after copulation. ... A lioness may have her cubs destroyed if the prides males are overthrown. ...


The word "carnivore" sometimes refers to the mammalian Order Carnivora, but this is misleading. Although many Carnivora fit the first definition of being exclusively meat eaters, not all do. For example, bears are members of Carnivora that are not carnivores in the dietary sense, and pandas are almost exclusively herbivorous. Likewise, some full-time (dolphins, shrews) and part-time (humans, pigs) predatory species among mammals, let alone all carnivorous non-mammals, are not members of Carnivora. Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Panda may refer to: // Giant Panda Panda (plant), a genus of the family Euphorbiaceae PANDAS or P.A.N.D.A.S. is Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptoccal infections Qinling Panda, a subspecies of the Giant Panda. ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Echolocating shrew be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about modern humans. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ...


Outside of the animal kingdom, there are several genera containing carnivorous plants and several phyla containing carnivorous fungi. The former are predominantly insectivores, while the latter prey mostly on microscopic invertebrates such as nematodes, amoeba and springtails. Nepenthes mirabilis in flower, growing on a road cut in Palau Carnivorous plants (sometimes called insectivorous plants) are plants that derive some or most of their nutrients (but not energy) from trapping and consuming animals or protozoans, most focusing on insects and other arthropods. ... Carnivorous fungi are fungi that derive some or most of their nutrients from trapping and digesting animals. ... Invertebrate is an English word that describes any animal without a spinal column. ... Classes Adenophorea    Subclass Enoplia    Subclass Chromadoria Secernentea    Subclass Rhabditia    Subclass Spiruria    Subclass Diplogasteria    Subclass Tylenchia The nematodes or roundworms (Phylum nematoda from Greek (nema): thread + -ode like) are one of the most common phyla of animals, with over 80,000 different described species (over 15,000 are parasitic). ... For other uses, see Amoeba (disambiguation). ... Families [1] Suborder Arthropleona Superfamily Entomobryoidea Entomobryidae Isotomidae Oncopoduridae Paronellidae Tomoceridae Superfamily Poduroidea Brachystomellidae Hypogastruridae Neanuridae Odontellidae Onychiuridae Poduridae Suborder Symphypleona Dicyrtomidae Katiannidae Sminthuridae Sminthurididae Bourletiellidae Arrhopalitidae Springtails (Order Collembola) form the largest of the three orders of modern hexapods that are no longer considered to be insects (along with...


Prehistoric mammals of the crown-clade Carnivoramorpha (Carnivora and Miacoidea without Creodonta), along with the early Order Creodonta, and some mammals of the even early Order Cimolesta, were true carnivores. The earliest carnivorous mammal is considered to be the Cimolestes that existed during the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary Periods in North America about 65 million years ago. Most species of Cimolestes were mouse to rat-sized, but the Late Cretaceous Cimolestes magnus reached the size of a marmot, making it one of the largest Mesozoic mammals known (20-60g). The cheek teeth combined the functions of piercing, shearing and grinding, and the molars of Palaeoryctes had extremely high and acute cusps that had little function other than piercing. The dentition of Cimolestes foreshadows the same cutting structures seen in all later carnivores. While the earlier smaller species were insectivores, the later marmot-sized Cimolestes magnus probably took larger prey and were definitely a carnivore to some degree. The cheek teeth of Hyracolestes ermineus (an ermine-like shrew - 40g) and Sarcodon pygmaeus ("pygmy flesh tooth" - 75g), were common in the Latest Paleocene of Mongolia and China and occupied the small predator niche. The cheek teeth show the same characteristic notches that serve in today's carnivores to hold flesh in place to shear apart with cutting ridges. The theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex that existed during the late Cretaceous, although not mammals, were "obligate carnivores". Superfamilies Miacoidea Viverravoidea Caniformia Feliformia Carnivoramorpha are a crown-clade order of mammals that include the Carnivora and closest relatives, but not Creodonta. ... Families Miacidae Viverravidae Miacoidea is an extinct paraphyletic superfamily that has been traditionally divided into two families of carnivores: Miacidae (the miacids) and Viverravidae. ... Families Hyaenodontidae Oxyaenidae The creodonts are an extinct order of mammals that lived from the Paleocene to the Pliocene epoch. ... Extinct biological order, part of the Ferae and possibly a sistertaxon to the Perissodactyla. ... Cimolestes (White Clay Thief) is a genus of primitive, opossum-like placental mammals. ... Tertiary geological time interval covers roughly the time span between the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and beginning of the most recent Ice Age, approximately 65 million to 1. ... A geologic period is a subdivision of geologic time that divides an era into smaller timeframes. ... // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... Species See text. ... Mesozoic Era is one of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ... Palaeoryctes is an extinct genus of mammal. ... A cusp is a sharp point or apex, such as occurs in two dimensions at the end of a crescent, or in three dimensions at the tip of a cone or horn. ... Dentition is the development of teeth and their arrangement in the mouth. ... Any organism with a diet that consists chiefly of insects and similar small creatures is an insectivore. ... The ermine (Mustela erminea) is a dark brown weasel, with a distinctive black-tipped tail. ... It has been suggested that Echolocating shrew be merged into this article or section. ... The Paleocene, early dawn of the recent, is a geologic epoch that lasted from 65. ... Families See text Theropods (beast foot) are a group of bipedal, primarily carnivorous dinosaurs, belonging to the saurischian (lizard-hip) family. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Binomial name Tyrannosaurus rex Osborn, 1905 Synonyms Manospondylus gigas Dynamosaurus imperiosus Dinotyrannus megagracilis Nanotyrannus lancensis? Tyrannosaurus (IPA pronunciation or ; from the Greek τυραννόσαυρος, meaning tyrant lizard) is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur. ... // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ...


Obligate carnivores

This tiger's sharp teeth and strong jaws are the classical physical traits expected from carnivorous mammalian predators

An obligate or true carnivore is an animal that must eat meat in order to thrive.[2] Hypercarnivores present specialized dentition for a meat-only diet. They may consume other products presented to them, especially animal products like cheese and bone marrow or sweet sugary substances like honey and syrup, but, as these items are not essential, they do not consume these on a regular basis. True carnivores lack the physiology required for the efficient digestion of vegetable matter, and, in fact, some carnivorous mammals eat vegetation specifically as an emetic. The domestic cat is a prime example of an obligate carnivore, as are all of the other felids.[3] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1416x2126, 1019 KB) Beschreibung: Gebiss eines sibirischen Tigers Aufnahmedatum: 19. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1416x2126, 1019 KB) Beschreibung: Gebiss eines sibirischen Tigers Aufnahmedatum: 19. ... For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... A hypercarnivore, as opposed to a hypocarnivore, is an animal that exclusively eats meat and nothing else. ... Animal products are either produced by an animal or taken from the body of an animal. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For the Dir en grey album, see The Marrow of a Bone. ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... In cooking, a syrup (from Arabic شراب sharab, beverage, via Latin siropus) is a thick, viscous liquid, containing a large amount of dissolved sugars, but showing little tendency to deposit crystals. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the industrial process, see anaerobic digestion. ... Vomiting (or emesis) is the forceful expulsion of the contents of ones stomach through the mouth. ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... “Feline” redirects here. ...


Characteristics of carnivores

Characteristics commonly 'associated' with carnivores include organs for capturing and disarticulating prey (teeth and claws serve these functions in many vertebrates) and status as a predator. In truth, these assumptions may be misleading, as some carnivores do not hunt and are scavengers (though most hunting carnivores will scavenge when the opportunity exists). Thus they do not have the characteristics associated with hunting carnivores. Carnivores have comparatively short digestive systems as they are not required to break down tough cellulose found in plants. This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Categories: Stub ...


Plant material

In most cases, some plant material is essential for adequate nutrition, particularly with regard to minerals, vitamins and fiber. Most wild carnivores consume this in the digestive system of their prey. Many carnivores also eat herbivore dung, presumably to obtain essential nutrients that they could not otherwise obtain, since their dentition and digestive system do not permit efficient processing of vegetable matter. For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Retinol (one vitamer of Vitamin A) A vitamin is an organic compound required as a nutrient in tiny amounts by an organism. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... what was here was sick and improperly spelled. ... Dung can refer to: (what lana belchers face looks like) Look up dung in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A nutrient is a substance used in an organisms metabolism which must be taken in from the environment. ...


List of carnivores

In contrast to the tiger, these Emperor penguins show that teeth and claws are not necessary to be a carnivore. They feed on crustaceans, fish, squid, and other small marine life.

Emperor penguins. ... Emperor penguins. ... Binomial name Gray, 1844 The Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the tallest and heaviest of all living penguin species. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Great Blue Heron, Ardea herodias, is a wading bird in the heron family Ardeidae, common over most of North and Central America as well as the West Indies and the Galápagos Islands, except for the far north and deserts and high mountains where there... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... “Feline” redirects here. ... Trinomial name Felis silvestris catus Schreber, 1775 For alternative meanings see cat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ... This article is about the animal. ... This article is about the animal. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map. ... For other uses, see Red Wolf (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Red Fox (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... For other members of the dog family, see Canidae. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Subfamilies and Genera Hyaeninae Crocuta Hyaena Parahyaena Protelinae Proteles Hyenas or Hyænas are moderately large terrestrial carnivores native to Africa, Arabia, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... This article is about the mammal. ... This article is about the animal. ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... Genera Monachus (Monk Seals) Mirounga (Elephant Seal) Lobodon (Crabeater Seals) Leptonychotes Hydrurga (Leopard Seals) Ommatophoca Erignathus (Bearded Seals) Phoca Halichoerus (Grey Seals) Cystophora (Hooded Seals) The true seals or earless seals are one of the three main groups of mammals within the seal suborder, Pinnipedia. ... Genera Eumetopias Zalophus Otaria Neophoca Phocarctos A resting Sea Lion in Galapagos National Park, Ecuador. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Distribution of Walrus Subspecies Walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) are large semi-aquatic mammals that live in the cold Arctic seas of the Northern Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... Families See text. ... The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ... Families †Thylacinidae Dasyuridae Myrmecobiidae The order Dasyuromorphia (meaning hairy tail[1]) is made up of most carnivorous marsupials, including quolls, dunnarts, the Numbat, the Tasmanian Devil, and the recently extinct Thylacine. ... For other uses, see Tasmanian Devil (disambiguation). ... Orders Accipitriformes     Cathartidae     Pandionidae     Accipitridae     Sagittariidae Falconiformes     Falconidae A bird of prey or raptor is a bird that hunts its food, especially one that preys on mammals or other birds. ... Genera Accipiter Micronisus Melierax Urotriorchis Erythrotriorchis The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the bird sub-family Accipitrinae in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... Genera Several, see text. ... For other uses, see Falcon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Owl (disambiguation). ... Orders Falconiformes (Fam. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Thalassorninae Anserinae Stictonettinae Plectropterinae Tadorninae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Oxyurinae and see text Anatidae is the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as geese and swan. ... “Seagull” redirects here. ... Modern genera Aptenodytes Eudyptes Eudyptula Megadyptes Pygoscelis Spheniscus For prehistoric genera, see Systematics Some penguins are curious. ... For other uses, see Pelican (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Stork (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heron (disambiguation). ... Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia The Anura is the order of animals in the class Amphibia that includes frogs and toads. ... Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... Families At least 9, see article. ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Cope, 1869 The gila monster (pronounced HEE-la, IPA pronunciation: ) (Heloderma suspectum) is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. ... Species Many, see text. ... Suborders Eusuchia Protosuchia † Mesosuchia † Sebecosuchia † Thalattosuchia † Crocodilia is an order of large reptiles that scientists believe branched off from class Reptilia about 220 million years ago. ... Binomial name Ouwens, 1912 Komodo dragon distribution The Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo Monitor[1], Komodo Island Monitor[1], Ora (to the natives of Komodo[2]), or simply Komodo, is the largest living species of lizard, growing to an average length of 2-3 metres (approximately... For other uses, see Turtle (disambiguation). ... Genera See below. ... Genera Family Cheloniidae (Oppel, 1811) Caretta Chelonia Eretmochelys Lepidochelys Natator Family Dermochelyidae Dermochelys Family Protostegidae (extinct) Family Toxochelyidae (extinct) Family Thalassemyidae (extinct) Sea turtles (Superfamily Chelonioidea) are turtles found in all the worlds oceans except the Arctic Ocean . ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tuna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Marlin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Bass (IPA /bæs/) is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. ... For other uses, see Octopus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... Genera Asprella Chelyconus Conus Floraconus Leptoconus The cone snails or cone shells (family Conidae) are marine snails found in coral reefs. ... For other uses, see Spider (disambiguation). ... Superfamilies Pseudochactoidea Buthoidea Chaeriloidea Chactoidea Iuroidea Scorpionoidea See classification for families. ... For other uses, see Arachnid (disambiguation). ... Mantis is Greek for prophet. ... Giant water bugs are members of the family Belostomatidae within the order Hemiptera, colloquially known as toe-biters. ... Classes Anthozoa - Corals and sea anemones Cubozoa - Sea wasps or box jellyfish Hydrozoa - Hydroids, hydra-like animals Scyphozoa - Jellyfish Cnidaria is a phylum containing some 10,000 species of relatively simple animals found exclusively in aquatic environments (most species are marine). ... Orders Forcipulatida Paxillosida Notomyotida Spinulosida Valvatida Velatida Brisingida Starfish redirects here. ...

See also

Nepenthes mirabilis in flower, growing on a road cut in Palau Carnivorous plants (sometimes called insectivorous plants) are plants that derive some or most of their nutrients (but not energy) from trapping and consuming animals or protozoans, most focusing on insects and other arthropods. ... Carnivorous fungi are fungi that derive some or most of their nutrients from trapping and digesting animals. ... Any organism with a diet that consists chiefly of insects and similar small creatures is an insectivore. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Three Mormon crickets eating a fourth Mormon cricket In zoology, cannibalism is a common ecological interaction in the animal kingdom and has been recorded for more than 1500 species (this estimate is from 1981, and likely a gross underestimation). ...

Compare and contrast

Look up man-eater in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ... Pigs are omnivores. ... The suffix vore comes from the Latin word vorare, meaning to devour, and is used to form nouns indicating what kind of a diet an animal has. ... A variety of vegetarian food ingredients Vegetarianism is the practice of a diet that excludes all animal flesh, including poultry, game, fish, shellfish or crustacea, and slaughter by-products. ...

References

  1. ^ Holliday, Jill A; Steppan, Scott J. Evolution of hypercarnivory: the effect of specialization on morphological and taxonomic diversity. Paleobiology, Winter 2004. Retrieved on July 24, 2007. 
  2. ^ "Definition: Obligate Carnivore" Cats.About.com
  3. ^ Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition, Lisa A. Pierson, DVM at catinfo.org]
is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Biological interactions result from the fact that organisms in an ecosystem interact with each other, in the natural world, no organism is an autonomous entity isolated from its surroundings. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... Amensalism is an interaction between two species where one impedes or restricts the success of the other while not being affected, positively or negatively, by the presence of the other. ... Commensalism is a term employed in ecology to describe a relationship between two living organisms where one benefits and the other is not significantly harmed or helped. ... In biology, mutualism is an interaction between two or more species, where both species derive benefit. ... Biological interactions result from the fact that organisms in an ecosystem interact with each other, in the natural world, no organism is an autonomous entity isolated from its surroundings. ... Biological interactions result from the fact that organisms in an ecosystem interact with each other, in the natural world, no organism is an autonomous entity isolated from its surroundings. ... Predator and Prey redirect here. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage Herbivory is a form of predation in which an organism known as an herbivore, consumes principally autotrophs[1] such as plants, algae and photosynthesizing bacteria. ... This article is about a relationship between organisms. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cheating, also known as exploitation, between organisms is a form of parasitism or specialized predation in which an organism engages in what appears to be a mutualistic relationship with another organism, but does not in fact provide any benefit to the other organism. ... For other uses, see Symbiosis (disambiguation). ... Trees in this Bangladesh forest are in competition for light. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
BIGpedia - Carnivore - Encyclopedia and Dictionary Online (292 words)
Carnivores are animals that eat a diet consisting mostly of meat.
True carnivores lack the physiology required for the digestion of vegetable matter.
Domesticated carnivores are often recommended to have vegetable supplements (or such containing processed pet foods) as meats designed for human consumption may be lacking in vital nutrients.
Carnivore (FBI) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (711 words)
Carnivore is a name given to a system implemented by the Federal Bureau of Investigation that is analogous to wiretapping except in this case, email and other communications are being tapped instead of telephone conversations.
Carnivore was essentially a customizable packet sniffer that could monitor all of a target user's Internet traffic.
The Carnivore device works much like commercial "sniffers" and other network diagnostic tools used by ISPs every day, except that it provides the FBI with a unique ability to distinguish between communications which may be lawfully intercepted and those which may not.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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