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Encyclopedia > Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University

Motto: "My heart is in the work." Andrew Carnegie
Established: 1900
Type: Private university
Endowment: US $1.056 billion[1]
President: Jared Cohon
Faculty: 1,426
Undergraduates: 5,758
Postgraduates: 4,644
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, U.S.
Campus: Urban, 144 acres (58 ha)
Colors: Cardinal, Gray, and Tartan Plaid[2]
Nickname: Tartans
Mascot: Scotty the Scottie Dog[3]
Athletics: NCAA Division III UAA
17 varsity teams[4]
Website: www.cmu.edu

Coordinates: 40.443322° N 79.943583° W Carnegie Mellon University (also known as CMU) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It began as the Carnegie Technical Schools, founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1900. In 1912, the school became Carnegie Institute of Technology and began granting four-year degrees. In 1967, the Carnegie Institute of Technology merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research to form Carnegie Mellon University. The University’s 140-acre main campus is three miles from Downtown Pittsburgh and abuts the campus of the University of Pittsburgh in the city's Oakland neighborhood. Copyright Carnegie Mellon University. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Jared Leigh Cohon is the current President of Carnegie Mellon University. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Scottish Terrier (also known as the Aberdeen Terrier), popularly called the Scottie, is a breed of dog best known for its distinctive profile. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Andrew Carnegie (last name properly pronounced , but often )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which was later merged with Elbert H. Garys Federal Steel Company and several smaller companies to create... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, founded in 1913, merged with the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1968 to form Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, sometimes called the Golden Triangle, is located at the precise confluence of the Allegheny River and the Monongahela River. ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... The Cathedral of Learning dominates the Oakland skyline Oakland is the academic center of Pittsburgh and the third largest downtown area in the state of Pennsylvania, behind only Center City Philadelphia and the Central Business District (Downtown Pittsburgh). ...


The University has seven colleges and schools: the Carnegie Institute of Technology (engineering), the College of Fine Arts, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Mellon College of Science, the Tepper School of Business (formerly the Graduate School of Industrial Administration), the School of Computer Science, and the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management. The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University oversees the Schools of Architecture, Art, Design, Drama, and Music; along with its associated centers, studios, and galleries. ... The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) is the second largest academic unit by enrollment of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. The college admitted its first freshman class in 1969, following the announcement of the pending closure of the Margaret Morrison Carnegie College for Women. ... Mellon College of Science is the school at Carnegie Mellon University that houses the Chemistry Department, Mathematical Sciences Department, Physics Department, and the Biology Department. ... The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consistently ranks among the top business schools in the world[4][5]. It is also consistently among the leaders in a wide range of specializations, such as Finance, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management and Information Technology. ... The School of Computer Science (SCS) at Carnegie Mellon University gained its present status as a separate school in 1988; the department of computer science was established in 1965. ... The H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management (The Heinz School) at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA is one of the nations top-ranked public policy schools. ...


Since its inception, Carnegie Mellon has grown into a world-renowned institution, with numerous programs that are frequently ranked among the best in the world. In the most recent release of the Top 200 World Universities by Times Higher Education, Carnegie Mellon was ranked 20th overall and 7th in technology.[5] In the 2008 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked Carnegie Mellon's undergraduate program 22nd in the nation amongst national research universities, and in the 2009 edition its graduate programs in Computer Science 4th, Engineering 7th, Business 17th, Public Affairs 10th, Fine Arts 7th and Psychology 9th. The university attracts students from all 50 U.S. states and 93 countries and was named one of the "New Ivies" by Newsweek in 2006. Peer institutions of Carnegie Mellon include Caltech, Cornell, Duke, Georgia Tech, MIT, Northwestern, Princeton, Penn and Stanford.[6] In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Stanford redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Post-Civil War industrialists accumulated unprecedented wealth and were eager to found institutions in their names. Washington Duke at Duke University, Leland Stanford at Stanford University (for his late son), John D. Rockefeller at the University of Chicago, Cornelius Vanderbilt at Vanderbilt University, and Phoebe Hearst at the University of California, Berkeley were just a few. Carnegie Mellon University was one of such schools. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Washington Duke (December 18, 1820 – May 08, 1905) was an American tobacco industrialist and philanthropist. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... Amasa Leland Stanford (March 9, 1824 – June 21, 1893) was an American tycoon, politician and founder of Stanford University. ... Stanford redirects here. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... {{Infobox Person | name = Cornelius Vanderbilt | image = Vanderbilt. ... Vanderbilt redirects here. ... Phoebe Apperson Hearst (1842-1919) was born in Franklin County, Missouri, United States. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Carnegie Technical Schools was founded in 1900 in Pittsburgh by the Scottish American industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who wrote the time-honored words "My heart is in the work" when he donated the funds to create the institution. Carnegie's vision was to open a vocational training school for the sons and daughters of working-class Pittsburghers. The name was changed to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1912, and the school began offering four-year degrees. In 1967, it merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research to become Carnegie Mellon University. In addition, Carnegie founded Carnegie Mellon's coordinate women's college, Margaret Morrison Carnegie College in 1903 (the college closed in 1973).[7] Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... Andrew Carnegie (last name properly pronounced , but often )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which was later merged with Elbert H. Garys Federal Steel Company and several smaller companies to create... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, founded in 1913, merged with the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1968 to form Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Margaret Morrison Carnegie College (MMCC), a womens college, was founded in 1903 as one of the four colleges of the Carnegie Institute of Technology, now known as Carnegie Mellon University. ...


There was little change to the campus during the period of the two World Wars and the Great Depression. A 1938 master plan by Githens and Keally suggested acquisition of new land along Forbes Avenue, but the plan was not fully implemented. The period starting with the construction of GSIA (1952) and ending with Wean Hall (1971) saw the institutional change from Carnegie Institute of Technology to Carnegie Mellon University. New facilities were needed to respond to the University's growing national reputation in artificial intelligence, business, robotics, and the arts. In addition, an expanding student population resulted in a need for improved facilities for student life, athletics, and libraries. The campus finally expanded to Forbes Avenue from its original land along Schenley Park. A ravine long known as "the cut" was gradually filled in to campus level, joining "the Mall" as a major campus open space. There have been two World Wars, now more commonly known as World War I or First World War (from 1914 to 1918), and World War II or Second World War (from 1939 to 1945). ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... AI redirects here. ... Forbes Avenue is one of the longest streets in Pittsburgh. ... The Cathedral of Learning is visible from Panther Hollow Lake Schenley Park is a large municipal park located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania between the neighborhoods of Oakland, Greenfield, and Squirrel Hill. ...

Hamerschlag and Roberts Halls are two of the principal teaching facilities of the College of Engineering
Hamerschlag and Roberts Halls are two of the principal teaching facilities of the College of Engineering

The buildings of this era reflect current attitudes toward architectural style. The International Style, with its rejection of historical tradition and its emphases on functionalism and expression of structure, had been in vogue in urban settings since the 1930s. It came late to the Carnegie campus because of the hiatus in building activity and a general reluctance among all institutions of higher education to abandon historical styles. By the 1960s, it was seen as a way to accomplish the needed expansion and at the same time give the campus a new image. Each building was a unique architectural statement that may have acknowledged the existing campus in its placement, but not in its form or materials. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural style of the 1920s and 1930s. ...


During the 1970s and 1980s, the tenure of University President Richard M. Cyert (1972–1990) witnessed a period of unparalleled growth and development. The research budget soared from roughly $12 million annually in the early 1970s to more than $110 million in the late 1980s. The work of researchers in new fields like robotics and software engineering helped the university build on its reputation for innovation and practical problem solving. President Cyert stressed strategic planning and comparative advantage, pursuing opportunities in areas where Carnegie Mellon could outdistance its competitors. One example of this approach was the introduction of the university's "Andrew" computing network in the mid-1980s. This pioneering project, which linked all computers and workstations on campus, set the standard for educational computing and established Carnegie Mellon as a leader in the use of technology in education and research. The Shadow robot hand system holding a lightbulb. ... Software engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software. ... The tower of a personal computer. ...


Carnegie Mellon today

Wean Hall, home of Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science, as well as the world's first internet-enabled Coke machine.[8]

In the 1990s and into the 2000s, Carnegie Mellon solidified its status among elite American universities, consistently ranking in the top 25 in US News and World Report rankings. Carnegie Mellon is distinct in its interdisciplinary approach to research and education and through the establishment of programs and centers that are outside the limitations of departments or colleges has established leadership in fields such as computational finance, information systems management, arts management, product design, behavioral economics, human-computer interaction, entertainment technology, and decision science. Within the past two decades, the university has built a new University Center, theater and drama building (Purnell Center), business school building (Posner Hall), and several dormitories. Baker Hall was renovated in the early 2000s, and new chemistry labs were established in Doherty Hall soon after. Several computer-science buildings, such as Newell Simon Hall, also were established, renovated, or renamed in the early 2000s. The university is in the process of building the Gates Center for Computer Science and renovating historic academic and residence halls. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2277 KB) Summary Picture of Wean Hall at Carnegie Mellon University taken just after President Bush was re-elected for a second term. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2277 KB) Summary Picture of Wean Hall at Carnegie Mellon University taken just after President Bush was re-elected for a second term. ... The School of Computer Science (SCS) at Carnegie Mellon University gained its present status as a separate school in 1988; the department of computer science was established in 1965. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Computational finance (also known as financial engineering) is a cross-disciplinary field which relies on mathematical finance, numerical methods and computer simulations to make trading, hedging and investment decisions, as well as facilitating the risk management of those decisions. ... Management Information Systems (MIS), are information systems, typically computer based, that are used within an organization. ... Nobel Prize in Economics winner Daniel Kahneman, was an important figure in the development of behavioral finance and economics and continues to write extensively in the field. ... // Human–computer interaction (HCI), alternatively man–machine interaction (MMI) or computer–human interaction (CHI) is the study of interaction between people (users) and computers. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Decision theory is an interdisciplinary area of study, related to and of interest to practitioners in mathematics, statistics, economics, philosophy, management and psychology. ...


The Gates Center for Computer Science will sit on a 5.6-acre site on the university's West Campus, surrounded by Cyert Hall, the Purnell Center for the Arts, Doherty Hall, Newell-Simon Hall, Smith and Hamburg halls and the Collaborative Innovation Center. It will contain 318 offices as well as labs, computer clusters, lecture halls, classrooms and a 250-seat auditorium. The Gates Center for Computer Science was made possible by a $20 million lead gift from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The building is anticipated to be completed within 2 years. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF) is the largest transparently operated[2] charitable foundation in the world, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates in 2000 and doubled in size by Warren Buffett in 2006. ...


On April 15, 1997, Jared L. Cohon, former dean of Yale University's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, was elected president by Carnegie Mellon's Board of Trustees. During Cohon's presidency, Carnegie Mellon has continued its trajectory of innovation and growth. He leads a strategic plan that aims to leverage the University's strengths to benefit society in the areas of biotechnology and life sciences, information and security technology, environmental science and practices, the fine arts and humanities, and business and public policy. Jared Leigh Cohon is the current President of Carnegie Mellon University. ... Yale redirects here. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ...


Campus

Carnegie Mellon's 140-acre main campus is three miles (5 km) from downtown Pittsburgh, between Schenley Park and the Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, and Oakland neighborhoods. Carnegie Mellon is bordered to the west by the campus of the University of Pittsburgh. Carnegie Mellon owns 81 buildings in the Oakland and Squirrel Hill neighborhoods of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh redirects here. ... The Cathedral of Learning is visible from Panther Hollow Lake Schenley Park is a large municipal park located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania between the neighborhoods of Oakland, Greenfield, and Squirrel Hill. ... Murray Avenue in Squirrel Hill (2005) Squirrel Hill is a large residential neighborhood in the east end of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. As of the census of 2000, there were 26,425 people, 12,030 households, and 6,325 families residing in the 15217 ZIP code, which covers approximately the same... Street in Shadyside, 2001. ... The Cathedral of Learning dominates the Oakland skyline Oakland is the academic center of Pittsburgh and the third largest downtown area in the state of Pennsylvania, behind only Center City Philadelphia and the Central Business District (Downtown Pittsburgh). ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Oakland is the name of several places in the United States of America: Oakland, Alabama Oakland, California (The best-known city with this name) Oakland, Florida Oakland, Maine Oakland, Maryland Oakland, Michigan Oakland, Missouri Oakland, Nebraska Oakland, New Jersey Oakland, Oklahoma Oakland, Oregon Oakland, Pennsylvania Oakland, Rhode Island Oakland, Tennessee... Murray Avenue in Squirrel Hill (2005) Squirrel Hill is a large residential neighborhood in the east end of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. As of the census of 2000, there were 26,425 people, 12,030 households, and 6,325 families residing in the 15217 ZIP code, which covers approximately the same...


A large grassy area known as "the Cut" forms the backbone of the campus, with a separate grassy area known as "the Mall" running perpendicular. The Cut was formed by filling in a ravine (hence the name) with soil from a nearby hill that was leveled to build the College of Fine Arts building.


The northwestern part of the campus (home to Hamburg Hall, Newell-Simon Hall, Smith Hall, and the site of the future Gates Center for Computer Science) was acquired from the U.S. Bureau of Mines in the 1980s. For most of the 20th century, the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) was the primary United States Government agency conducting scientific research and disseminating information on the extraction, processing, use, and conservation of mineral resources. ...

A panoramic view of Carnegie Mellon University's Pittsburgh campus from the College of Fine Arts Lawn.From left to right: College of Fine Arts, Hunt Library, Baker and Porter Hall, Hamerschlag Hall, University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning (in the background), Wean Hall and Doherty Hall, Purnell Center, and the University Center. Also visible are "The Fence," and "Walking to the Sky" sculpture.
A panoramic view of Carnegie Mellon University's Pittsburgh campus from the College of Fine Arts Lawn.
From left to right: College of Fine Arts, Hunt Library, Baker and Porter Hall, Hamerschlag Hall, University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning (in the background), Wean Hall and Doherty Hall, Purnell Center, and the University Center. Also visible are "The Fence," and "Walking to the Sky" sculpture.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (17729x1926, 5691 KB) As a student attending Carnegie Mellon University, I took a series of photographs from the College of Fine Arts Lawn on Monday, December 11, 2006 (during the first round of finals), and later stitched them together to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (17729x1926, 5691 KB) As a student attending Carnegie Mellon University, I took a series of photographs from the College of Fine Arts Lawn on Monday, December 11, 2006 (during the first round of finals), and later stitched them together to create... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ...

Beyond Pittsburgh

In addition to its Pittsburgh campus, Carnegie Mellon has extension campuses in Mountain View, California in the heart of Silicon Valley (offering masters programs in Software Engineering and Software Management); Qatar; and a new campus in Adelaide, Australia. The Adelaide campus, opened in May 2006, delivers masters programs from both the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management and the Entertainment Technology Center. The Tepper School of Business maintains a satellite center in downtown Manhattan. Carnegie Mellon also maintains the Carnegie Mellon Los Angeles Center in North Hollywood, California. Students in the Master of Entertainment Industry Management program are required to relocate to Los Angeles in their second year and attend classes at this facility. Carnegie Mellon's Information Networking Institute offers graduate programs in Athens, Greece and Kobe, Japan, in collaboration with Athens Information Technology and the Hyogo Institute of Information Education Foundation, respectively. Starting in the fall of 2007, the cities of Aveiro and Lisbon, Portugal will be added to the Information Networking Institute's remote locations, and starting in 2008 the Entertainment Technology Center will offer a graduate program in Osaka, Japan and Singapore. Carnegie Mellon West Title Logo Carnegie Mellon West is a branch campus of Carnegie Mellon University located in the heart of Silicon Valley in Mountain View, CA. It was established in 2002[1] on NASAs Ames Research Center in Moffett Field. ... For the Nintendo 64 game, see Space Station Silicon Valley. ... Software engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software. ... Carnegie Mellon Qatar Campus is a branch campus of Carnegie Mellon University located in Education City near Doha, Qatar. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... The H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management is part of Carnegie Mellon University and is named for the late U.S. Senator H. John Heinz III. History Richard King Mellon and his wife had long been interested in urban and social issues. ... The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consistently ranks among the top business schools in the world[4][5]. It is also consistently among the leaders in a wide range of specializations, such as Finance, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management and Information Technology. ... North Hollywood is a district in the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Port Tower at night Kōbe (Japanese: 神戸市; -shi) is a city in Japan, located on the island of Honshu. ... Location    - Country  Portugal  - Region Centro  - Subregion Baixo Vouga  - District or A.R. Aveiro Mayor Élio Maia  - Party PSD-CDS Area 199. ... Lisbon (in Portuguese, Lisboa) is the capital and largest city of Portugal. ...


In media, entertainment & culture

The Carnegie Mellon University campus in Pittsburgh served as the locale for many of the on-campus scenes in the 2000 film Wonder Boys, starring Michael Douglas and Tobey Maguire. Other movies filmed at Carnegie Mellon include The Mothman Prophecies, "Lorenzo's Oil", and Flashdance. The university is also featured prominently in the film Smart People, starring Sarah Jessica Parker and Dennis Quaid. Wonder Boys is a 2000 film adaptation of the Michael Chabon novel of the same name. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ... Tobias Vincent Maguire (born June 27, 1975) is an American actor. ... The 2002 film The Mothman Prophecies is an adaptation of the 1976 book The Mothman Prophecies by parapsychologist and Fortean John Keel. ... Flashdance is a musical and romance film released in April 1983, and was one of the most successful films of the early 1980s. ... Dennis Quaid on the set of Smart People at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Smart People is an upcoming American comedy film starring Dennis Quaid and Sarah Jessica Parker. ... Sarah Jessica Parker (born March 25, 1965) is an American actress and producer, with a portfolio of television, movie, and theater performances. ... Dennis William Quaid (born April 9, 1954) is an American actor. ...


Schools and divisions

Margaret Morrison Hall, home of the Carnegie Mellon School of Design
Margaret Morrison Hall, home of the Carnegie Mellon School of Design
  • The College of Fine Arts was founded in 1905, and today is a federation of schools with professional training programs in the visual and performing arts (Architecture, Art, Design (ranked #1 MFA program in Multimedia and Visual Communication)[9], Drama and Music). The college shares research projects, interdisciplinary centers and educational programs with other units across the university.
  • The H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management offers masters degrees in Public Policy and Management, Health Care Policy and Management, Medical Management, Public Management, Arts Management, Entertainment Industry Management, and Information Security Policy and Management. The school is a partner in the Universitywide Master of Information Systems Management and Master of Science in Information Technology programs. It also offers a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Management as well as executive education programs.
The Hunt Library at Carnegie Mellon University is the largest library on the Pittsburgh Campus
The Hunt Library at Carnegie Mellon University is the largest library on the Pittsburgh Campus
  • The School of Computer Science: Carnegie Mellon University helped define, and continually redefines, the field of computer science. The School of Computer Science is recognized internationally as one of the top schools for computer science.[10]
  • The Tepper School of Business (Tepper) offers undergraduate programs in Business Administration and Economics. The Tepper School offers masters degrees in Business Administration (MBA) and joint degrees in Computational Finance (MSCF) with the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Mellon College of Science and the School of Computer Science. In addition, joint degrees are offered with Civil and Environmental Engineering. The Tepper School offers doctoral degrees in several areas and presents a number of executive education programs. Until 2004, the Tepper School was named the Graduate School of Industrial Administration (GSIA).

In addition to the research and academic institutions, the University hosts the Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Sciences, a state-funded summer program that aims to foster interest in science amongst gifted high school students. The Cyert Center for Early Education is a child care center for Carnegie Mellon faculty and staff, as well as an observational setting for students in child development courses. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... Chemical engineers design, construct and operate plants Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering that deals with the application of physical science (e. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Environmental engineering[1][2] is the application of science and engineering principles to improve the environment (air, water, and/or land resources), to provide healthy water, air, and land for human habitation and for other organisms, and to remediate polluted sites. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems. ... Computer engineering (or Computer Systems Engineering) encompasses broad areas of both electrical engineering and computer science[1]. Computer engineers are electrical engineers that have additional training in the areas of software design and hardware-software integration. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... The Materials Science Tetrahedron, which often also includes Characterization at the center Materials science or Materials Engineering is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering. ... The College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University oversees the Schools of Architecture, Art, Design, Drama, and Music; along with its associated centers, studios, and galleries. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... This article is about building architecture. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... The H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management is part of Carnegie Mellon University and is named for the late U.S. Senator H. John Heinz III. History Richard King Mellon and his wife had long been interested in urban and social issues. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... For other uses, see Management (disambiguation). ... Public administration includes many routine concerns that are only distinct from private management in the goals advanced, the types of infrastructure used, and the scale. ... The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) is the second largest academic unit by enrollment of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. The college admitted its first freshman class in 1969, following the announcement of the pending closure of the Margaret Morrison Carnegie College for Women. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Social and Decision Sciences, informally known as SDS, is an academic department in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... Information System (example) An Information System (IS) is the system of persons, data records and activities that process the data and information in a given organization, including manual processes or automated processes. ... Mellon College of Science is the school at Carnegie Mellon University that houses the Chemistry Department, Mathematical Sciences Department, Physics Department, and the Biology Department. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Mathematics Bogomolny, Alexander: Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Green chemistry is a chemical philosophy encouraging the design of products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. ... Map of the human X chromosome (from the NCBI website). ... Computational biology is an interdisciplinary field that applies the techniques of computer science and applied mathematics to problems inspired by biology. ... Nanotechnology refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale, generally 100 nanometers or smaller, and the fabrication of devices with critical dimensions that lie within that size range. ... Computational finance (also known as financial engineering) is a cross-disciplinary field which relies on mathematical finance, numerical methods and computer simulations to make trading, hedging and investment decisions, as well as facilitating the risk management of those decisions. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The School of Computer Science (SCS) at Carnegie Mellon University gained its present status as a separate school in 1988; the department of computer science was established in 1965. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consistently ranks among the top business schools in the world[4][5]. It is also consistently among the leaders in a wide range of specializations, such as Finance, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management and Information Technology. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... MBA redirects here. ... Computational finance (also known as financial engineering) is a cross-disciplinary field which relies on mathematical finance, numerical methods and computer simulations to make trading, hedging and investment decisions, as well as facilitating the risk management of those decisions. ... Executive Education is the term used for programs at graduate-level business schools in the United States that aim to give classes for Chief Executives and other top managers or entrepreneurs. ... The Pennsylvania Governors School for the Sciences (PGSS) is one of the Pennsylvania Governors Schools of Excellence, a group of five-week summer programs for gifted high school students in the state of Pennsylvania. ...


Undergraduate profile

Posner Hall, home of the Tepper School of Business
Posner Hall, home of the Tepper School of Business

For the undergraduate class of 2011, the admission rate was 28.0%. In 2007, the University received a record 22,356 undergraduate applicants, an increase of 18.5% from 2006, and admitted 6,259. The 2006 class had an average SAT verbal score of 657 and math score of 728. Also, 71% of the admitted students for the class of 2010 were in the top 10% of their graduating high school classes. In 2006, the most selective undergraduate college was the Tepper School of Business, which admitted only 13.9% of total applicants. The largest college, in terms of enrollment, is the Carnegie Institute of Technology with 423 students in the class of 2011, followed by the College of Fine Arts (with 265 students) and the College of Humanities & Social Sciences (with 260). The smallest college in terms of total undergraduate students is the Tepper School of Business, with 93 undergraduate students enrolled for the class of 2011. Carnegie Mellon enrolls students from all 50 states, and 13% of the students are citizens of countries other than the United States. About 94% of first-year students return for their second year, and 69.3% graduate within four years (86.2% within six). Undergraduate tuition is $36,950 for the class of 2011 and room and board is $9,660.[11] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consistently ranks among the top business schools in the world[4][5]. It is also consistently among the leaders in a wide range of specializations, such as Finance, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management and Information Technology. ...


For the class of 2010, Carnegie Mellon had the highest overlap in applications with Cornell University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Pennsylvania. The class of 2010 had the highest overlap in acceptances with Case Western Reserve, the University of Michigan, and Johns Hopkins University.[11] Cornell redirects here. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ...


Research

The LORAX rover Nomad being tested on New Hampshire's Mascoma Lake with its wind turbine deployed
The LORAX rover Nomad being tested on New Hampshire's Mascoma Lake with its wind turbine deployed

For the 2006 fiscal year, the University spent $315 million on research. The primary recipients of this funding were the School of Computer Science ($100.3 million), the Software Engineering Institute ($71.7 million), the Carnegie Institute of Technology ($48.5 million), and the Mellon College of Science ($47.7 million). The research money comes largely from federal sources, with federal investment of $277.6 million. The federal agencies that invest the most money are the National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense, which contribute 26% and 23.4% of the total university research budget respectively.[11] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Lorax is a childrens story written by Dr. Seuss and first published in 1971. ... Mascoma Lake is a 1,165-acre[1] lake in western New Hampshire, United States. ... The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense and operated by Carnegie Mellon University. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ...


The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) is a joint effort between Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh, and Westinghouse Electric Company. PSC was founded in 1986 by its two scientific directors, Dr. Ralph Roskies of the University of Pittsburgh and Dr. Michael Levine of Carnegie Mellon University. PSC is a leading partner in the TeraGrid, the National Science Foundation’s cyberinfrastructure program.[12] The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) is a joint effort between Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh, and Westinghouse Electric Company. ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Westinghouse Electric Company is a nuclear reactor technology business company, providing nuclear services, power plants, nuclear fuel, and fuel handling equipment to utilities and governments in the United States, Europe, and Asia. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


The Robotics Institute (RI) is a division of the School of Computer Science and considered to be one of the leading centers of robotics research in the world. The Field Robotics Center (FRC) has developed a number of significant robots, including Sandstorm and H1ghlander, which finished second and third in the DARPA Grand Challenge, and Boss, which won the DARPA Urban Challenge. The RI is primarily sited at Carnegie Mellon's main campus in Newell-Simon hall, which was once a Bureau of Mines Building.[13] The Robotics Institute (RI) at Carnegie Mellon University was established in 1979. ... Look up sandstorm in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... H1ghlander during the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge. ... Darpa Grand Challenge The DARPA Grand Challenge is a prize competition for driverless cars, sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the central research organization of the United States Department of Defense. ... 2007 Urban Challenge The DARPA Grand Challenge is a prize competition for driverless cars, sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the central research organization of the United States Department of Defense. ...


The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense and operated by Carnegie Mellon University, with offices in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Redstone Arsenal, Alabama; Arlington, Virginia, and Frankfurt, Germany. The SEI publishes books on software engineering for industry, government and military applications and practices. The organization is known for its Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), which identify essential elements of effective system and software engineering processes and can be used to rate the level of an organization's capability for producing quality systems. The SEI is also the home of CERT/CC, the federally-funded computer security organization. The CERT Program's primary goals are to ensure that appropriate technology and systems management practices are used to resist attacks on networked systems and to limit damage and ensure continuity of critical services subsequent to attacks, accidents, or failures.[14] The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense and operated by Carnegie Mellon University. ... Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs) conduct research for the United States Government. ... Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Software engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software. ... The Capability Maturity Model (CMM) is a process capability maturity model which aids in the definition and understanding of an organizations processes. ... Capability Maturity Model® Integration (CMMI) is a process improvement approach that provides organizations with the essential elements of effective processes. ... The CERT Coordination Center was created by DARPA in November 1988 after the Morris worm struck. ...


The Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) is a division of the School of Computer Science and is considered one of the leading centers of human-computer interaction research, integrating computer science, design, social science, and learning science.[15] Such interdisciplinary collaboration is the hallmark of research done throughout the university. The Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) is a division of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... // Human–computer interaction (HCI), alternatively man–machine interaction (MMI) or computer–human interaction (CHI) is the study of interaction between people (users) and computers. ...


Carnegie Mellon is also home to the Carnegie School of management and economics. This intellectual school grew out of the Tepper School of Business in the 1950s and 1960s and focused on the intesection of behavioralism and management. Several management theories, most notably bounded rationality and the behavioral theory of the firm, were established by Carnegie School management scientists and economists. The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consistently ranks among the top business schools in the world[4][5]. It is also consistently among the leaders in a wide range of specializations, such as Finance, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management and Information Technology. ... Many models of human behavior in the social sciences assume that humans can be reasonably approximated or described as rational entities, especially as conceived by rational choice theory. ... The theory of the firm consists of a number of economic theories which describe the nature of the firm (company or corporation), including its behaviour and its relationship with the market. ...


Alumni and faculty

There are more than 70,000 Carnegie Mellon alumni worldwide. Famous alumni include former General Motors CEO and Secretary of Defense, Charles Erwin Wilson; billionaire hedge fund investor David Tepper; James Gosling, creator of the Java programming language; Andy Bechtolsheim, co-founder of Sun Microsystems; Vinod Khosla, billionaire venture capitalist and co-founder of Sun Microsystems; pop artist Andy Warhol; and astronaut Judith Resnik, who perished in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (727x1000, 273 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): John Forbes Nash ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (727x1000, 273 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): John Forbes Nash ... John Forbes Nash, Jr. ... A Beautiful Mind is a book and Academy Award-winning film (starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer, and Paul Bettany) about the Nobel Prize (Economics) winning mathematician John Nash and his experiences of schizophrenia. ... This is a list of encyclopedic people associated with Carnegie Mellon University in the United States of America. ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is a multinational corporation headquartered in the United States and has been the worlds largest and most dominant automaker since 1931 till the second half of 2007, surpassed by Toyota; as well as the global industry sales leader for 77 years. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Charles Erwin Wilson (July 18, 1890 - September 26, 1961), American businessman and politician, was United States Secretary of Defense from 1953 to 1957 under President Eisenhower. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... Image:Dtepper. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Java language redirects here. ... Andy (Andreas) von Bechtolsheim (born in Germany in 1955) co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 with Vinod Khosla, Bill Joy, and Scott McNealy. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Vinod Khosla (born January 28, 1955 in Pune, India[1]) is an Indian-American venture capitalist. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... Dr. Judith Arlene Resnik (April 5, 1949 – January 28, 1986) was an American astronaut who died at the age of 36 in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster during the launch of the mission STS-51-L. Resnik was born in Akron, Ohio and attended Hebrew school. ... Space Shuttle Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-099) was NASAs second Space Shuttle orbiter to be put into service, Columbia being the first. ...


Carnegie Mellon alumni have won Nobel prizes, Turing awards, Academy awards, Emmy awards, and Tony awards. John Forbes Nash, a 1948 graduate and winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize in Economics, was the subject of the book and subsequent film A Beautiful Mind. Alan Perlis, a 1943 graduate was a pioneer in programming languages and recipient of the first ever Turing award. Overall, Carnegie Mellon is affiliated with 15 Nobel laureates, ten Turing Award winners, seven Emmy Award recipients, three Academy Award recipients, and four Tony Award recipients (including Andrew Omondi). John Forbes Nash, Jr. ... The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, commonly called the Nobel Prize in Economics, is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... A Beautiful Mind is a book and Academy Award-winning film (starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer, and Paul Bettany) about the Nobel Prize (Economics) winning mathematician John Nash and his experiences of schizophrenia. ... Alan Jay Perlis (April 1, 1922 - February 7, 1990) was a prominent U.S. computer scientist. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... Winners of the Nobel prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... An Emmy Award. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ...


Carnegie Mellon also has produced several alumni who have had success in Hollywood, Broadway and the music industry. They include Best Actress Academy award winner Holly Hunter, actor James Cromwell, Get Smart actress Barbara Feldon, actor Ted Danson, director George Romero, and actor Blair Underwood, among many others. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Holly Hunter (born March 20, 1958) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... James Oliver Cromwell (born January 27, 1940), sometimes credited as Jamie Cromwell, is an Academy Award-nominated American television and film actor. ... For the updated film based on the TV series, see Get Smart (film). ... Barbara Feldon (Barbara Hall) (born March 12, 1932) is an American actress, game show panelist of the 1960s and model, known for her character-type roles. ... Ted Danson (born Edward Bridge Danson III on December 29, 1947) is an American actor most notable for his television work, and specifically, for his role as central character Sam Malone in the sitcom Cheers, and his role as Dr. John Becker on the series Becker. ... George A. Romero (born 4 February 1940) is an American director, writer, editor, actor and composer. ... Blair Underwood (born August 25, 1964) is an American television and film actor. ...


Rankings and reputation

Carnegie Mellon's offerings in computer science, engineering, business, public policy, psychology, and the arts are considered among the best in their fields. Carnegie Mellon is ranked 22nd amongst national research universities in the most recent US News and World Report rankings. In the Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) ranking of world universities, Carnegie Mellon ranks 12th overall in the United States (20th in the world),[16] fifth in the United States (7th in the world) in the Technology category and 15th in the United States (28th in the world) in the social sciences category.[17] In 2007, Webometrics ranks Carnegie Mellon 12th/13th in the World.[18] The university is one of 60 elected members of the Association of American Universities and its academic reputation has led it to be included in Newsweek’s list of “New Ivies”.[19] The School of Computer Science (SCS) at Carnegie Mellon University gained its present status as a separate school in 1988; the department of computer science was established in 1965. ... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consistently ranks among the top business schools in the world[4][5]. It is also consistently among the leaders in a wide range of specializations, such as Finance, Entrepreneurship, Operations Management and Information Technology. ... The H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management (The Heinz School) at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA is one of the nations top-ranked public policy schools. ... The College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University oversees the Schools of Architecture, Art, Design, Drama, and Music; along with its associated centers, studios, and galleries. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ...


Carnegie Mellon is ranked 4th for graduate studies in computer science in 2008, in rankings released by the US News and World Report.[20] Carnegie Mellon is also ranked #15 in the social sciences and #7 in Engineering/Technology and Computer Sciences among Shanghai Jiao Tong University's world's top 100 universities.[21] Detailed information on the rankings of undergraduate and graduate programs at Carnegie Mellon is available on the University website.[22] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Student life

Traditions

A Mobot competing in the annual Mobot challenge
A Mobot competing in the annual Mobot challenge
  • The Fence - In the early days of Carnegie Tech, there was a single bridge, which connected Margaret Morrison Women's College with the Carnegie Institute of Technology. The bridge was a meeting place for students. In 1916, the bridge was taken down and the university filled in the area. The senior class of 1923 put up a wooden fence to be the new meeting place. The administration tried to tear it down, but some fraternity brothers painted it as a prank to advertise a fraternity party. Ever since, painting the Fence has been a Carnegie Mellon tradition.[23] The Fence at Carnegie Mellon lies at the center of campus, in the area known as “the cut." Students “guard” the fence 24 hours a day, and, as long as this vigil is maintained, no other students may “take” the fence. Once the fence is taken, however, the painting traditionally happens between midnight and 6am.
  • Mobot - "Mobot,' a general term resulting from shortening "mobile robot," is an annual competition at Carnegie Mellon that made its debut in 1994. In this event, robots try (autonomously) to pass through gates, in order, and reach the finish line. There is a white line on the pavement connecting the gates, and the line is normally used to find the gates, though it is not mandated by the rules that the robots follow the line.
  • Spring Carnival - Usually held in April, Spring Carnival is the biggest event of the school year. In addition to classic carnival attractions, the Spring Carnival features the “Buggy Sweepstakes” and "Booth" (a competition between various organizations to build small, elaborate booths based around a theme chosen each year).
  • Buggy Races - Buggy, officially called Sweepstakes, is a race around Schenley Park. It can be thought of as a relay race with five runners, using the buggy vehicle as the baton. Entrants submit a small, usually torpedo-shaped, vehicle that is pushed uphill and then allowed to roll downhill. The vehicles are unpowered, including the prohibition of such energy-storing devices as flywheels. They are, however, steered by a driver who is usually a petite female student lying prone, arms stretched forward to steer via a turning mechanism. Space is so tight inside the buggies that the drivers usually cannot change position beyond turning their heads.
  • Bagpipers - As the only College offering a degree in bagpipe music,[24] Carnegie Mellon's Pipe Band features the sounds of Scottish bagpipes and performs at University events. Head of the Pipe Band is world champion piper Alasdair Gillies, formerly a highly decorated pipe major in the British Army.
Two pushers exchange the buggy for Kappa Delta Rho on the first hill of Sweepstakes.
  • Autographing the Green Room - Seniors in the College of Fine Arts sign the Green Room's walls and ceilings before leaving the university. Supposedly, Oscar-winning actress Holly Hunter broke university tradition by signing the Green Room during her freshman year.
  • The Kiltie Band- Carnegie Mellon's Kiltie Band, dressed in full Scottish regalia including kilts and knee socks, performs during every home football game.

// The first great tradition at Carnegie Mellon is the fence, which is the most painted object on campus, and lies in the middle of the Cut. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Cathedral of Learning is visible from Panther Hollow Lake Schenley Park is a large municipal park located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania between the neighborhoods of Oakland, Greenfield, and Squirrel Hill. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 680 KB) Summary This is a picture taken by a friend and subsequently given to me to use for any purpose. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 680 KB) Summary This is a picture taken by a friend and subsequently given to me to use for any purpose. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University oversees the Schools of Architecture, Art, Design, Drama, and Music; along with its associated centers, studios, and galleries. ...

Fraternities / sororities

The Greek tradition at Carnegie Mellon University began nearly 100 years ago with the founding of the first fraternity on campus, Theta Xi, in 1912. The Panhellenic sorority community was founded in 1945, by Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Kappa Alpha Theta, and Kappa Kappa Gamma. During the spring semester of 2006, the Greek community consisted of 26 active fraternities and sororities: 5 Panhellenic sororities; 12 Interfraternity Council fraternities; 4 Asian American groups, 2 fraternities and 2 sororities; and 4 National Pan-Hellenic (historically African American) chapters represented on campus (3 fraternities and 1 sorority). Of Carnegie Mellon’s undergraduates, 965 were members of social Greek-letter organizations. This number reflected 18.4 % of the campus population. Theta Xi (ΘΞ) is a fraternity founded at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York on 29 April 1864. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ...

Current Panhellenic sororities: Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Phi Kappa Theta (ΦΚΘ) is a national social fraternity with over 50 chapters and colonies at universities across the United States. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity or Sig Tau is a U.S. all-male college social fraternity founded on June 28, 1920 at University of Central Missouri (then known as Central Missouri State Teachers College). ... Theta Xi (ΘΞ) is a fraternity founded at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York on 29 April 1864. ... ZBT redirects here. ...

Current Pan-Hellenic Chapters (Historically Black): Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ...

Current Asian-American fraternities and sororities: Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ...

alpha Kappa Delta Phi (αΚΔΦ) (also known as aKDPhi) is the largest, nationwide Asian-American interest sorority. ... Flower: Orchid Gem: Diamond Mascot: Phoenix Motto: Sisterhood, Service & Cultural Diversity Homepage: http://www. ... ΛΦΕ (Lambda Phi Epsilon, also known as Lambdas, LPhiE, LFE) is a nationally-recognized Asian-interest fraternity based in the United States. ... Pi Delta Psi. ...

Athletics

Carnegie Mellon's Gesling stadium
Carnegie Mellon's Gesling stadium

The Carnegie Mellon Tartans were a founding member of the University Athletic Association of the NCAA Division III. Prior to World War II Carnegie Mellon (as Carnegie Tech) played with NCAA Division I teams and in 1939 the Tartan football team earned a trip to the Sugar Bowl. That same year, Robert Doherty, university president at the time, banned the football team from competing in postseason bowl games. Currently, varsity teams are fielded in basketball, track, cross country, football, golf, soccer, swimming, volleyball, tennis, and cheerleading. In addition, club teams exist in Ultimate Frisbee,[25] rowing,[26] rugby, lacrosse, hockey,[27], baseball,[28] softball, and cycling.[29] Carnegie Mellon Athletics runs a comprehensive and popular intramural system, maintains facilities (primarily Skibo Gymnasium, University Center, and Gesling Stadium), and offers courses to students in fitness and sports. Carnegie Mellon's primary athletic rivals are fellow UAA schools Case Western Reserve University and Washington University in St. Louis. The Tartans have an especially intense rivalry with the Washington University in St. Louis Football team. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... Washington University redirects here. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


Football

In 1926, Carnegie Tech's football team beat Knute Rockne's Notre Dame Fighting Irish.[30] The game was ranked the fourth greatest upset in college football history by ESPN.[31] Knute (pronounced kah-noot) (noot is the anglicized nickname) Kenneth Rockne (March 4, 1888 – March 31, 1931) was an American football player and is regarded as one of the greatest coaches in college football history. ... Head coach Charlie Weis 3rd year, 22–15–0 through 11/24/07 Home stadium Notre Dame Stadium Capacity 80,795 - Grass Conference Independent First year 1887 Athletic director Dr. Kevin White Website UND.com Team records All-time record 824–278–42 (.739) Postseason bowl record 13–15 Awards... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ...


In 2006, the varsity football team was offered a bid to the NCAA Division III playoffs, and became one of the first teams in school history (the first team to win a Division III playoff game was in 1977, when Carnegie Mellon beat Dayton) and University Athletic Association (UAA) conference history to win an NCAA Playoff game with a 21-0 shutout of Millsaps College of the SCAC conference[32]. In addition to winning a playoff game, several team members were elected to the All American and All Region Squads. The 2006 team won more games in a single season than any other team in school history. The current coach is Rich Lackner who is also a graduate of Carnegie Mellon and has been the head coach since 1986. The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... Millsaps College is a private liberal arts college in Jackson, Mississippi, supported by the United Methodist Church. ...


Crew (Rowing)

Carnegie Mellon Rowers on the Allegeny River for morning practice.

The Carnegie Mellon University Rowing Club is a club-sponsored team sport organized by students of the university. They participate in several regattas across the northeast, including the Dad Vail Regatta in Philadelphia. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Track/Cross Country

In recent years, the varsity track and cross country programs have seen outstanding success on the Division III National level. The Men's Cross Country team has finished in the top 15 in the nation each of the last three years, and has boasted several individual All-Americans. The Men's Track team has also boasted several individual All-Americans spanning sprinting, distance, and field disciplines.


Photo gallery

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 1187 KB) Summary The Kraus Campo, a garden and art installation at Carnegie Mellon University, located on the roof of the Posner Center, between the College of Fine Arts building and Posner Hall, home of the Tepper School of Business. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Carnegie Mellon Qatar Campus is a branch campus of Carnegie Mellon University located in Education City near Doha, Qatar. ... // The first great tradition at Carnegie Mellon is the fence, which is the most painted object on campus, and lies in the middle of the Cut. ... Carnegie Mellon West Title Logo Carnegie Mellon West is a branch campus of Carnegie Mellon University located in the heart of Silicon Valley in Mountain View, CA. It was established in 2002[1] on NASAs Ames Research Center in Moffett Field. ... cmuTV is the student-run television station at Carnegie Mellon University. ... This is a list of encyclopedic people associated with Carnegie Mellon University in the United States of America. ... ScotchnSoda is a student run theatre organization that resides on the campus of Carnegie Mellon University. ... The Carnegie Pulse is an online-only news magazine at Carnegie Mellon University. ... The Cut is the name of several different things: The Cut is a street in London The Cut is a river in Berkshire, England The Cut is the name of a UK band The Cut is the name of two American reality television series: The Cut, a MTV talent quest... Issue of The Tartan from the 1980s The Tartan, formerly known as The Carnegie Tartan, is the original student newspaper of Carnegie Mellon University. ... WRCT is a non-commercial freeform radio station based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...

References

  1. ^ "Carnegie Mellon by the Numbers (1997–2007)". cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  2. ^ Official Carnegie Mellon colors. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  3. ^ Carnegie Mellon Family Will Get a Dog. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  4. ^ Carnegie Mellon Athletics official website. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  5. ^ The Top 200 World Universities. timeshighereducation.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  6. ^ Peer institutions of Carnegie Mellon University. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  7. ^ History of MMCC. carnegiemellontoday.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
  8. ^ "The 'Only' Coke Machine on the Internet". cs.cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  9. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2009", U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-04-27. 
  10. ^ "America's Best Graduate Schools 2009", U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2008-03-28. 
  11. ^ a b c Admission Statistics. my.cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-16.
  12. ^ PITTSBURGH SUPERCOMPUTING CENTER. Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  13. ^ Robotics Institute. Robotics Institute. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  14. ^ Software Engineering Institute. sei.cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-16.
  15. ^ Welcome to the Human-Computer Interaction Institute. Human-Computer Interaction Institute. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  16. ^ THES - QS World University Rankings 2007 - Top 100 Universities. topuniversities.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
  17. ^ Carnegie Mellon University. topuniversities.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
  18. ^ Top 4000 Universities. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  19. ^ 25 New Ivies. Newsweek. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  20. ^ America's Best Graduate Schools 2009. usnews.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  21. ^ 2008 Academic Ranking of World Universities by Broad Subject Fields. ed.sjtu.edu.cn. Retrieved on 2008-03-06.
  22. ^ Rankings of various Carnegie Mellon programs. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  23. ^ Walking Tour. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  24. ^ Traditions. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  25. ^ Carnegie Mellon Ultimate Club. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  26. ^ Tartan Crew. tartancrew.org. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  27. ^ Tartan Ice Hockey. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  28. ^ Join the Baseball Club. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  29. ^ Carnegie Mellon Cycling Club. cmu.edu. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  30. ^ Tech's Greatest Victory. carnegiemellontoday.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  31. ^ Upset special: With Rockne gone, Irish took a Michigan-like tumble. sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  32. ^ Carnegie Mellon football tramples Majors. thetartan.org. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) is a joint effort between Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh, and Westinghouse Electric Company. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Robotics Institute (RI) at Carnegie Mellon University was established in 1979. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) is a division of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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