FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Carnegie Medal

The Carnegie Medal in Literature was established in the UK in 1936 in honour of Scottish philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. It is awarded to an outstanding book for children and young adult readers. Nominated books must be written in English and should first have been published in the UK during the previous year. The Carnegie judging panel consists of 13 children's librarians from the Youth Libraries Group of CILIP, and is thus similar to the American Newbery medal. Nominated books are also read by students from many schools who send feedback to the judging panel. CILIP also recognizes excellence in illustration, with the Kate Greenaway Medal, which is similar to the American Caldecott medal. 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, businessman, a major and widely respected philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) is a professional body representing librarians and other information professionals in the United Kingdom. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Illustration by Jessie Willcox Smith. ... The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in the UK in 1955 in honour of the childrens illustrator, Kate Greenaway. ... The Caldecott Medal was designed by Rene Paul Chambellan in 1937. ...


The award is announced in the July following the year of publication. The winner receives a golden medal and £500 worth of books to donate to a public or school library.


The original rules stated that an author could only win the Medal once. This rule was later changed to enable subsequent work by the same author to be included for consideration.


List of winners

(note that years refer to the publication date of the books - the medal was awarded the following year)

Mal Peet is an English author born in North Norfolk, who writes novels mainly for young adults. ... Tamar is a fictional war novel for children by Mal Peet, published on October 3, 2005 by Walker Books Ltd. ... Frank Cottrell Boyce is a British screenwriter, novelist and occasional actor, best known for his collaborations with film director Michael Winterbottom. ... Millions is a 2004 film and book written by Frank Cottrell Boyce. ... Jennifer Donnelly (born in Port Chester, New York) is a historical fiction author best-known for her novel A Northern Light (published in England as A Gathering Light). ... A Northern Light (2003) is a historical novel by Jennifer Donnelly. ... Sharon Creech (born July 29, 1945) is an American author, born in South Euclid, Ohio. ... Ruby Holler is a 2002 childrens novel by American writer Sharon Creech. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... one of his remaining lives for Dangerous Beans. Though Spider is defeated, there is still a problem remaining: the rat piper is due to arrive the next day. ... Beverley Naidoo is a popular childrens author who has written a number of award-winning books about life in South Africa, where she spent her childhood. ... Aidan Chambers is the author of Breaktime, Dance on My Grave, Now I Know, The Toll Bridge, Postcards from No Mans Land and This is All - The Pillow Book of Cordelia Kenn. ... David Almond is a British childrens writer who has penned several novels, each one to critical acclaim. ... Skellig is a childrens book by David Almond, for which Almond was given the Carnegie Medal in 1998 and also the Whitbread Childrens Book of the Year Award. ... Tim Bowler is an English writer for young adults. ... Melvin Burgess (born April 25, 1954) is a British author of childrens fiction. ... Junk may refer to: Junk (ship), sailing vessel of Chinese origin Junk (Transformers), fictional planet in the Transformers universe Junk (novel), by Melvin Burgess Junk (film), 2000 Japanese zombie film Waste, as in worthless material Hard drugs, junk being a slang term for that junk, slang for male genitals junk... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is an English writer. ... The trilogy (U.K versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... Theresa Breslin is a Scottish author, primarily of young adult fiction. ... Robert Swindells (nicknamed Bob) is the author of the Award Winning Book Stone Cold. ... Photograph of Anne Fine Anne Fine (born December 7, 1947) is a British author best known for her childrens books, of which she has written more than 50. ... Gillian Cross is a childrens author. ... Photograph of Anne Fine Anne Fine (born December 7, 1947) is a British author best known for her childrens books, of which she has written more than 50. ... Geraldine McCaughrean Geraldine McCaughrean (pronounced Mc-cork-ran)¹ is a British childrens novelist. ... Susan Price, born 1955 in Dudley in the West Midlands, is an award winning English writer of novels for young adults. ... Kevin Crossley-Holland (born 1941) is an English childrens author and poet Born in Mursley, North Buckinghamshire, Holland grew up in Whiteleaf, a small village in the Chilterns. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, Netherlands A storm is any disturbed state of an astronomical bodys atmosphere, especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather. ... Margaret Mahy ONZ (born in Whakatane, New Zealand on 21 March 1936) is a well-known New Zealand author of childrens and young adult books. ... Jan Mark is an author from the United Kingdom. ... Look up Handle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A handle may refer to any of several things: For a device attached to a movable object, that is gripped to move or use the object, see handle (grip). ... Margaret Mahy ONZ (born in Whakatane, New Zealand on 21 March 1936) is a well-known New Zealand author of childrens and young adult books. ... The Haunting is a 1963 horror film directed by Robert Wise and adapted by Nelson Gidding from the novel The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson. ... Robert Westall (October 7, 1929 – April 15, 1993) is the author of many books, mostly fiction for children, though also for adults, and non-fiction. ... Peter Dickinson is a British author who has written a wide variety of books over a long and distinguished career. ... City of Gold, and similar titles or concepts may refer to: Lost city Lost city (disambiguation) // Quivira and Cíbola - Two of the mythical Seven Cities of Gold. ... Peter Dickinson is a British author who has written a wide variety of books over a long and distinguished career. ... In Tibetan Buddhism, a tulku is the reincarnation of a lama or other spiritually significant figure. ... Gene Kemp (December 27, 1926) is a British author best known for her childrens books. ... The Turbulent Term of Tyke Tiler is a childrens novel by Gene Kemp, first published in 1977. ... Jan Mark is an author from the United Kingdom. ... Robert Westall (October 7, 1929 – April 15, 1993) is the author of many books, mostly fiction for children, though also for adults, and non-fiction. ... The Machine Gunners is a book by Robert Westall (1929-1993) that was adapted by the BBC into a British television serial in 1983. ... Mollie Hunter (born 1922) is a Scottish writer. ... Penelope Lively (born March 17, 1933) is a prolific, popular and critically acclaimed author of fiction for both children and adults. ... The Ghost of Thomas Kempe is a novel for children by Penelope Lively published in 1973. ... Richard George Adams (born May 9, 1920 in Newbury, Berkshire, England) is a British novelist who is best known for two novels with animal characters, Watership Down and The Plague Dogs. ... For other uses, see Watership Down (disambiguation). ... Ivan Southall (born June 8, 1921) is a celebrated Australian writer of childrens books. ... Look up Josh, josh in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Leon Garfield (14 July 1921, Brighton, Sussex, England – 2 June 1996) was a British writer of fiction. ... Edward Blishen (1920-1996) was an English author. ... Charles William James Keeping (22 September 1924 - 16 May 1988) was a British illustrator, childrens book author and lithographer. ... The God Beneath the Sea is a childrens novel by Leon Garfield and Edward Blishen, with illustrations by Charles Keeping. ... K. M. Peyton is the pseudonym of husband and wife team Kathleen Wendy Herald Peyton (born August 2, 1929 in Birmingham) and Michael P. Peyton. ... The Edge Of The Cloud (1969) is the second novel in the Flambards sequence by K. M. Peyton. ... Rosemary Jeanne Harris (born 1923, London) is a British writer of fiction for children. ... Alan Garner (born Congleton October 17, 1934) is an English writer whose work is firmly rooted in his local Cheshire. ... The Owl Service (ISBN 0152017984) is a teenage fantasy novel by Alan Garner first published in 1967. ... Philip William Turner (born December 3, 1925) is an English author best known for his childrens books about the fictional town of Darnley Mills and (as Stephen Chance) about the Reverend Septimus Treloar. ... Lucy M. Boston (1892-1990) was a British author noted for her longevity; she did not have her first book published until she was over 60. ... Green Knowe is the name of a series of books written by Lucy M. Boston. ... Rosemary Sutcliff (December 14, 1920 - July 23, 1992) was a British novelist, best known as a writer of highly acclaimed historical fiction. ... The Lantern Bearers is a historical adventure novel for children written by Rosemary Sutcliff and published in 1959, with illustrations by Charles Keeping. ... Ann Philippa Pearce (b. ... Toms Midnight Garden is a childrens novel by Philippa Pearce. ... William Mayne (1928-) is a British writer of childrens fiction. ... Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... The Last Battle is the seventh and final novel in The Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis. ... Eleanor Farjeon (February 13, 1881 – June 5, 1965) was an English author of stories and poems. ... Ronald Welch (Pseudonym of Ronald Oliver Felton) (1909 - 1982) His pseudonym comes from his wartime regiment, The Welch. ... Mary Norton can refer to: Mary Teresa Norton, one of the first United States Congresswomen. ... The Borrowers (book cover) The Borrowers is a novel by Mary Norton about tiny people who borrow things from normal humans and keep their existence unknown. ... Cynthia Harnett (June 22, 1893 - October 25, 1981) was a highly acclaimed English writer of childrens historical fiction. ... The Woolpack The Woolpack is a fictional public house on the popular ITV1 soap opera Emmerdale. ... Elfrida Vipont was the pen name of Elfrida Vipont Foulds (née Brown) (1902-1992), a British childrens author. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that The Listeners be merged into this article or section. ... Elizabeth Goudge (April 24, 1900 - April 1, 1984) was an English author of novels, short stories and childrens books. ... The Little White Horse is a 1946 childrens book by Elizabeth Goudge It is being adapted into a movie, with a script written by Lucy Shuttleworth and Graham Alborough, and to be directed by Oliver Parker. ... Eric Robert Russell Linklater (1899-1974) was a Scottish writer, known for more than 20 novels, also short stories, travel writing and autobiography, and military history. ... Denys James Watkins-Pitchford (b. ... Eleanor Doorly (died 1950) was an award-winning British writer of childrens books. ... Noel Streatfeild (December 24, 1897 - September 11, 1986) was an author of childrens books, most famous for her book Ballet Shoes (1936) and later books about children with careers in the arts. ... Eve Garnett was a British author and illustrator, born circa January 9, 1900. ... The Family From One End Street is a British childrens book set in the Fens of England, written by Eve Garnett. ... Cover of Arthur Ransomes autobiography Arthur Mitchell Ransome (January 18, 1884 – June 3, 1967), was a British author and journalist, best known for writing the Swallows and Amazons series of childrens books, which tell of school-holiday adventures of children, mostly in the Lake District and the Norfolk... Pigeons with messages attached. ...

See also

The Blue Peter Book Awards are a series of literary prizes for childrens literature awarded annually by the BBC television programme Blue Peter, and inaugurated in 2000. ... Childrens Laureate is an award made in the UK once every two years to a distinguished writer or illustrator of childrens books. ... The Guardian Childrens Fiction Prize or Guardian Award is a prominent award for works of childrens literature by British or Commonwealth authors, published in the UK during the preceding year. ... The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in the UK in 1955 in honour of the childrens illustrator, Kate Greenaway. ... The Nestlé Smarties Book Prize is an annual award given to childrens books written in the previous year by a UK citizen or resident. ...

External links

  • Carnegie Award homepage

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Carnegie Medal (174 words)
The Carnegie Medal is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children.
Carnegie was a self-made industrialist who made his fortune in steel in the USA.
The medal is now awarded by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, which is a new organisation formed by the Unification of the Institute of Information Scientists and The Library Association on 1 April 2002.
Carnegie Medal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (479 words)
The Carnegie Medal in Literature was established in the UK in 1936 in honour of Andrew Carnegie.
The Carnegie judging panel consists of 13 children's librarians from the Youth Libraries Group of CILIP, and is thus similar to the American Newbery medal.
CILIP also recognizes excellence in illustration, with the Kate Greenaway Medal, which is similar to the American Caldecott medal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m