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Encyclopedia > Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Carnegie Hall
Location: Midtown Manhattan, New York City, NY
Built/Founded: 1890
Architect: William Tuthill
Architectural style(s): Italian renaissance
Designated as NHL: December 29, 1962 [1]
Added to NRHP: October 15, 1966 [2]
NRHP Reference#: 66000535
Governing body: Carnegie Hall Corporation

Carnegie Hall (generally pronounced /ˌkɑrnɨgi ˈhɔːl/)[3] is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1224x1632, 498 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... An American architect best known for his work on Carnegie Hall. ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... 7th Avenue, looking south from 50th Street Seventh Avenue/Adam Clayton Powell Jr. ... 57th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ...


Built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most famous venues in the United States for classical music and popular music, renowned for its beauty, history and acoustics. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 100 performances each season. It is also rented out to performing groups. The hall has not had a resident company since the New York Philharmonic moved to Lincoln Center's Philharmonic Hall in 1962. A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Andrew Carnegie (properly pronounced , but commonly or )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Mellon University, and Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company, which was later merged... Acoustics is the interdisciplinary sciences that always deals with the study of sound, ultrasound and infrasound (all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids). ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... , Avery Fisher Hall in Lincoln Center. ...


Other concert halls that bear Carnegie's name include: 420-seat Carnegie Hall in Lewisburg, West Virginia; 1928-seat Carnegie Music Hall in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on the site of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the main branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh; 1022-seat Carnegie Music Hall annexed to Pittsburgh suburb Homestead's Carnegie library; and 540-seat Carnegie Hall, in Andrew Carnegie's native Dunfermline, Scotland, Carnegie Hall, Inc. ... Lewisburg is a city located in Greenbrier County, West Virginia. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh are operated by the Carnegie Institute and are located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh is the public library system in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Homestead is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA, in the Mon Valley, seven miles (11 km) southeast of downtown Pittsburgh but directly across the river from the city limit line. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article is about the country. ...

Contents

Performing arts venues

Carnegie Hall contains three distinct, separate concert halls: the Main Hall, the Recital Hall and the Chamber Music Hall.


The Main Hall

Carnegie Hall's main auditorium seats 2,804 on five levels. It was named for the violinist Isaac Stern in 1997. Isaac Stern (July 21, 1920 – September 22, 2001) is widely considered one of the finest violin virtuosi of the twentieth century. ...


The Main Hall is enormously tall, and visitors to the top balcony must climb 105 steps. All but the top level can be reached by elevator.[4]


Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time the hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Judy Garland and Harry Belafonte, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.[5] Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman[1] , (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician and virtuoso clarinetist, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the ninth of twelve children of poor Jewish... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Harold George Belafonte, Jr. ...


Zankel Hall

Zankel Hall, which seats 599, is named for Judy and Arthur Zankel. Originally called simply Recital Hall, this was the first auditorium to open to the public in April 1891. Following renovations made in 1896, it was renamed Carnegie Lyceum. It was leased to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in 1898, converted to a cinema around 1959, and was reclaimed to be used as an auditorium in 1997. The newly reconstructed hall opened in September 2003.[6][7] Because of its location below street level, passing subways can be heard through the walls. The Colony Club location in New York City. ...


Weill Recital Hall

Weill Recital Hall, which seats 268, is named for Sanford I. Weill, the chairman of Carnegie Hall's board, and his wife Joan. This auditorium, in use since the hall opened in 1891, was originally called Chamber Music Hall (later Carnegie Chamber Music Hall); the name was changed to Carnegie Recital Hall in the late 1940s, and finally became Weill Recital Hall in 1986. Sanford I. Weill, commonly known as Sandy Weill (born March 16, 1933) is a banker, financier and philanthropist. ...


Other facilities

The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Studios above the Hall contain working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers, and painters. In 2007, the Carnegie Hall Corporation announced plans to evict the 33 remaining studio residents (some residing in the building since the 1950's) and use the space for educational facilities.[8]


Architecture

Carnegie Hall Exterior

Carnegie Hall is one of the last large buildings in New York built entirely of masonry, without a steel frame; however, when several flights of studio spaces were added to the building near the turn of the 20th century, a steel framework was erected around segments of the building. The exterior is rendered in narrow Roman bricks of a mellow ochre hue, with details in terracotta and brownstone. The foyer avoids contemporary Baroque theatrics with a high-minded exercise in the Florentine Renaissance manner of Filippo Brunelleschi's Pazzi Chapel: white plaster and gray stone form a harmonious system of round-headed arched openings and Corinthian pilasters that support an unbroken cornice, with round-headed lunettes above it, under a vaulted ceiling. The famous white and gold interior is similarly restrained. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1224x1632, 498 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1224x1632, 498 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... This tomb on Appian Way in Rome features extensive Roman brickwork. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... Sculpture of Brunelleschi looking at the dome in Florence Filippo Brunelleschi (1377 – April 15, 1446) was one of the foremost architects of the Italian Renaissance. ... The Pazzi family were Tuscan nobles who had become bankers in Florence in the 14th century. ... In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ... Example of cornice laden roof line In classical architecture the cornice is the set of projecting moldings that crown an entablature. ... In architecture, a lunette (diminutive of French lune, moon) is a half-moon shaped space, either masonry or void. ...


History

Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who paid for its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was on May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Originally known simply as "Music Hall" (the words "Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie" still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall's original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists' studios, and alterations to the auditorium on the building's lower level. Andrew Carnegie (properly pronounced , but commonly or )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Mellon University, and Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company, which was later merged... The Oratorio Society of New York is a not-for-profit membership organization which performs choral music in the Oratorio style. ... The New York Symphony Society was an orchestra founded in New York City by Leopold Damrosch in 1878. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Walter Johannes Damrosch (born in Breslau, Prussia, January 30, 1862; died in New York City, December 22, 1950) was an American symphony conductor. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ...


The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie's widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon Jr. took over. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall's concert dates each year. The orchestra declined, since they planned to move to Lincoln Center, then in the early stages of planning. At the time, it was widely believed that New York City could not support two major concert venues. Facing the loss of the hall's primary tenant, Simon was forced to offer the building for sale. A deal with a commercial developer fell through, and by 1960, with the New York Philharmonic on the move to Lincoln Center, the building was slated for demolition to make way for a commercial skyscraper. Under pressure from a group led by violinist Isaac Stern and many of the artist residents, special legislation was passed that allowed the city of New York to buy the site from Simon for $5 million, and in May of 1960 the nonprofit Carnegie Hall Corporation was created to run the venue. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962.[1],[9],[10] The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Isaac Stern (July 21, 1920 – September 22, 2001) is widely considered one of the finest violin virtuosi of the twentieth century. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...

Carnegie Hall - Elevation
Carnegie Hall - Elevation

Image File history File linksMetadata Carnegie_Hall_Wikipedia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Carnegie_Hall_Wikipedia. ...

Renovations and additions

The building was extensively renovated in 1983 and 2003, by James Polshek, who became better known through his post-modern planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. Polshek and his firm, Polshek Partnership, were involved since 1978 in four phases of the Hall's renovation and expansion including the creation of a Master Plan in 1980; the actual renovation of the main hall, the Stern Auditorium, and the creation of the Weill Recital Hall and Kaplan Rehearsal Space, all in 1987; the creation of the Rose Museum, East Room and Club Room (later renamed Rohatyn Room and Shorin Club Room, respectively), all in 1991; and, most recently, the creation of Zankel Hall in 2003.[6][7] James Polshek (born 1930) is an American architect currently residing in New York. ... For the song by Ai Otsuka, see Planetarium (song) // A planetarium is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation. ... Main Lobby in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial. ...


The renovation was not without controversy. Following completion of work on the main auditorium in 1986, there were complaints that the famous acoustics of the hall had been diminished.[11] Although officials involved in the renovation denied that there was any change, complaints persisted for the next nine years. In 1995, the cause of the problem was discovered to be a slab of concrete under the stage. The slab was subsequently removed.[12]


In 1987-1989, a 60-floor office tower, named Carnegie Hall Tower, was completed next to the hall on the same block. New backstage space and banquet spaces, contained within the tower, connect with the main Carnegie Hall building.


In June of 2003, tentative plans were made for the Philharmonic to return to Carnegie Hall beginning in 2006, and for the orchestra to merge its business operations with those of the venue. However, these plans were called off later in 2003.


Management

The Executive and Artistic Director of Carnegie Hall (from July 2005) is Sir Clive Gillinson, formerly managing director of the London Symphony Orchestra. Sir Clive Gillinson (born 7 March 1946, Bangalore, India) is a British musician and music manager. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ...


The Carnegie Hall Archives

Unexpectedly, for most concert-goers, it emerged in 1986 that Carnegie Hall had never consistently maintained an archive. Without a central repository, a significant portion of Carnegie Hall's documented history had been dispersed. In preparation for the celebration of Carnegie Hall's centennial (1991), the Carnegie Hall Archives was established.


World premieres at Carnegie Hall

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This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Concerto in F is a composition by George Gershwin for solo piano and orchestra which is closer in form to a traditional concerto than the earlier jazz-influenced Rhapsody in Blue. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Symphony Society was an orchestra founded in New York City by Leopold Damrosch in 1878. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Walter Johannes Damrosch (born in Breslau, Prussia, January 30, 1862; died in New York City, December 22, 1950) was an American symphony conductor. ... An American in Paris is a symphonic composition by American composer George Gershwin which debuted in 1928. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Walter Johannes Damrosch (born in Breslau, Prussia, January 30, 1862; died in New York City, December 22, 1950) was an American symphony conductor. ... Variations on a Theme of Corelli (Russian: , ), opus 42, is a group of 20 variations on Arcangelo Corellis Sonata for violin, violone, and harpsichord (Op. ... Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and remained there from 1918 until his death. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and remained there from 1918 until his death. ... Density 21. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bartok redirects here. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman[1] , (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician and virtuoso clarinetist, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the ninth of twelve children of poor Jewish... Joseph Szigeti (September 5, 1892 – February 19, 1973) was a Hungarian violinist. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (pronounced [ˈaːrnÉ”lt ˈʃøːnbÉ›rk]) (13 September 1874 – 13 July 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer, associated with the expressionist movement in German poetry and art, and leader of the Second Viennese School. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fritz Stiedry (born [October 11th 1883 in Vienna, died August 8, 1968 in Zurich) was an Austrian conductor. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... Composed by Paul Hindemith in 1943. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Artur RodziÅ„ski (January 1, 1892 - November 27, 1958) was a Polish conductor. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (pronounced [ˈaːrnÉ”lt ˈʃøːnbÉ›rk]) (13 September 1874 – 13 July 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer, associated with the expressionist movement in German poetry and art, and leader of the Second Viennese School. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Artur RodziÅ„ski (January 1, 1892 - November 27, 1958) was a Polish conductor. ... Stravinskys Symphony in Three Movements was written between 1942-5 and dedicated to the New York Philharmonic Symphony Society. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Woodrow Charles Herman (May 16, 1913 – October 29, 1987), better known as Woody Herman, was an American jazz clarinetist, alto and soprano saxophonist, singer, and big band leader. ... Walter Hendl (born 12 January 1917) is an American conductor. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lou Silver Harrison (May 14, 1917 - February 2, 2003) was an American composer. ... Olivier Messiaen It has been suggested that List of students of Olivier Messiaen be merged into this article or section. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni StanisÅ‚aw BolesÅ‚awowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... The Second Symphony was written by Charles Ives between 1897 and 1901. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... The Symphony No. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... In 1962, at the age of 80, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni StanisÅ‚aw BolesÅ‚awowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... American composer Charles Sprague Ruggles (March 11, 1876 - October 24, 1971), better known as Carl, wrote finely-crafted pieces using dissonant counterpoint, a term coined by Charles Seeger to describe Ruggles music. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... John Corigliano (b. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In 1962, at the age of 80, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. ... Milton Byron Babbitt (born May 10, 1916) is an American composer. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The American Composers Orchestra is an American orchestra based in New York City that primarily performs contemporary compositions by American composers. ... Charles Wuorinen (born June 9, 1938 in New York City) is an American composer. ... Plutonian Ode is a poem written by Allen Ginsberg in 1978 against the arms race and nuclear armament of the superpowers. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The American Composers Orchestra is an American orchestra based in New York City that primarily performs contemporary compositions by American composers. ... Dennis Russell Davies (born 16 April 1944, Toledo, Ohio, USA) is an American conductor External links Biography Biography (scroll down for English translation) Categories: | ... For the Alaska-based postminimalist composer, see John Luther Adams. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Garrick Ohlsson (born April 3, 1948 in New York) is an American classical pianist. ... Imant Karlis Raminsh (b. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Composers Orchestra is an American orchestra based in New York City that primarily performs contemporary compositions by American composers. ... Steven Sloane (born Los Angeles, United States of America, 1958) [1] is an American-born, British-based musical director. ... Mary Harron (born 1953) is a Canadian film director and screenwriter most well known for her films I Shot Andy Warhol, American Psycho and The Notorious Bettie Page. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Composers Orchestra is an American orchestra based in New York City that primarily performs contemporary compositions by American composers. ... Steven Sloane (born Los Angeles, United States of America, 1958) [1] is an American-born, British-based musical director. ... Dan Trueman is a composer, improviser, new instrument creator and software designer. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Composers Orchestra is an American orchestra based in New York City that primarily performs contemporary compositions by American composers. ... Laptop with touchpad. ... Steven Sloane (born Los Angeles, United States of America, 1958) [1] is an American-born, British-based musical director. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Composers Orchestra is an American orchestra based in New York City that primarily performs contemporary compositions by American composers. ... Steven Sloane (born Los Angeles, United States of America, 1958) [1] is an American-born, British-based musical director. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orpheus Chamber Orchestra is a small classical music orchestra which has made many recordings. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pierre-Laurent Aimard (born 9 September 1957) is a French pianist. ... Taku Sakakibara, better known as TaQ (pronounced Ta-KU, not tack), is a musician who works for Konami, producing songs for Bemani games. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... Playing a musical saw A musical saw, also called a singing saw, is the application of a hand saw as a musical instrument. ... Natalia Paruz is reviving the old-time art of playing the musical saw. ... For other uses, see Baritone (disambiguation). ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Youth Symphony is a youth orchestra based in New York City. ... Susquehanna University is a national liberal arts college in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 50 miles north of the state capital, Harrisburg. ... Westlake High School is a school located in West Lake Hills, Texas and part of the Eanes Independent School District. ... Westlake High School is a school located in West Lake Hills, Texas and part of the Eanes Independent School District. ... Gordon Goodwin is an American jazz pianist, saxophonist, composer, arranger and conductor. ... Westlake High School is a school located in West Lake Hills, Texas and part of the Eanes Independent School District. ... // The Florida Young Artists Orchestra, or FYAO, is a youth orchestra serving the Orlando, Florida region. ... // The Florida Young Artists Orchestra, or FYAO, is a youth orchestra serving the Orlando, Florida region. ... Several people are named Robert Kerr: Robert Kerr was an 18th-century writer from Scotland. ... // The Florida Young Artists Orchestra, or FYAO, is a youth orchestra serving the Orlando, Florida region. ...

Location and folklore

  • Carnegie Hall is located at the southeast corner of Seventh Avenue and 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
  • The famous American actor Clifton Webb first appeared on stage here (in the Carnegie Lyceum, today's Zankel Hall, on the building's lower level) at the age of seven, in 1900, as Cholly in The Brownies and subsequently as Oliver in Oliver Twist, in Rags and Royalty, as Prince Arthur in Shakespeare's tragedy King John, and Sid Sawyer in Huckleberry Finn [13].
  • A venerable legend has become part of the folklore of the hall: A New Yorker (or in some versions Arthur Rubinstein) is approached in the street near Carnegie Hall, and asked, "Pardon me sir, but how do I get to Carnegie Hall?" He replies, "Practice, practice, practice." The Directions page of the Carnegie Hall Web site gently alludes to the joke.
  • Carnegie Hall is not to be confused with Pittsburgh's Carnegie Music Hall, also founded by Andrew Carnegie, and part of the Carnegie Museum and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Main (Oakland) Branch. There are distinct differences in the pronunciation of Carnegie's name; the Pittsburgh way, emphasizing the second syllable - ne - is how Andrew himself actually pronounced it.
  • In 1991, Carnegie Hall received The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York."

7th Avenue, looking south from 50th Street Seventh Avenue/Adam Clayton Powell Jr. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Clifton Webb (November 19, 1889 – October 13, 1966) was an American actor, dancer and singer. ... Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... The Life and Death of King John is one of the Shakespearean histories, plays written by William Shakespeare and based on the history of England. ... Huckleberry Finn is the protagonist of Mark Twains famous book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. ... For the 19th century Russian pianist and composer, see Anton Rubinstein Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Arthur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 – December 20, 1982) was a Polish pianist who is widely considered as one of the greatest piano virtuosos of the 20th Century. ... The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh are operated by the Carnegie Institute and are located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ... The logo of The Hundred Year Association of New York The Hundred Year Association of New York was founded in 1927 to recognize and reward dedication and service to the City of New York by businesses and organizations that have been in operation in the City for a century or...

See also

New York City is home to hundreds of cultural institutions and historic sites, many of which are internationally known. ... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... -1... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman[1] , (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician and virtuoso clarinetist, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the ninth of twelve children of poor Jewish... Chicago at Carnegie Hall Volumes I, II, III and IV is the first live album by American band Chicago and was initially released in 1971 as a four LP vinyl box set on Columbia Records. ... A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ... A box set (sometimes referred to as a boxed set) is one or more musical recordings, films, television programs, or other collection of related things that are contained in a box. ... This article is about the American pop-rock-jazz band. ... 1889 poster showing Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ a b Carnegie Hall. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service (2007-09-09).
  2. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  3. ^ Although Andrew Carnegie pronounced his name with the stress on the second syllable, the building is generally pronounced with the stress on the first syllable.
  4. ^ Bronx General Interest: General Interest in Bronx, New York
  5. ^ Bronx General Interest: General Interest in Bronx, New York
  6. ^ a b Dunlap, David W. (2000-01-30), “Carnegie Hall Grows the Only Way It Can; Burrowing Into Bedrock, Crews Carve Out a New Auditorium”, New York Times, <http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9903E0D91E3CF933A05752C0A9669C8B63> 
  7. ^ a b Muschamp, Herbert T. (2003-09-12), “ARCHITECTURE REVIEW; Zankel Hall, Carnegie's Buried Treasure”, New York Times, <http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D00EED9133BF931A2575AC0A9659C8B63> 
  8. ^ Great Rooms - The Remaining Tenants of the Carnegie Hall Studio Towers - New York Magazine
  9. ^ ["Carnegie Hall", by Richard Greenwood.PDF (296 KiB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory]. National Park Service (1975-05-30).
  10. ^ ["Carnegie Hall--Accompanying Photos".PDF (686 KiB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory]. National Park Service (1975-05-30).
  11. ^ Michael Walsh, "Sounds in the night". Time, 16 February 1987.
  12. ^ Kozinn, Alan. "A Phantom Exposed: Concrete at Carnegie", The New York Times, 1995-09-14. Retrieved on 2008-03-16. 
  13. ^ Parker, John (ed), Who's Who in the Theatre, 10th revised edition, London, 1947: 1429
  • Richard Schickel, The World of Carnegie Hall, 1960, recounts all the lore.

Coordinates: 40°45′53.8″N, 73°58′48.5″W A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The History of the National Register of Historic Places began in 1966 when the United States government passed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which created the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). ... Clockwise from bottom left: a site, a building, a structure and an object. ... Helvenston House, part of the Ocala Historic District, in Ocala, Florida. ... Broadly defined, a contributing property is any property, structure or object which adds to the historical intergrity or architectural qualities that make a historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. ... Image File history File links US-NationalParkService-ShadedLogo. ... This is a list of entries on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Carnegie Hall Privacy Policy (1159 words)
Carnegie Hall knows that you care how personal information you provide to us is used and shared.
Carnegie Hall receives and stores any information you choose to enter on the Carnegie Hall web site, or provide us in any other way, such as by telephone or by electronic mail.
Carnegie Hall is committed to protecting your privacy; however, this privacy notice applies only to the information collected via the Carnegie Hall web site.
Carnegie Hall Accessibility Information (362 words)
Carnegie Hall has received one of the first-ever "Access New York" awards to institutions that have made important contributions toward making New York more accessible to people with disabilities.
Carnegie Hall is accessible from the west entrance to the main lobby on 57th Street.
For all three halls, assistive listening devices are available free of charge with the deposit of a valid form of ID. For events in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage and Weill Recital Hall, visit the coat-check room on the west side of the Carnegie Hall lobby.
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