FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Carmine Infantino
Carmine Infantino
Born May 24, 1925 (1925-05-24) (age 81)
Brooklyn, New York City
Nationality American
Area(s) Penciller, Editor
Notable works Flash (Barry Allen)
Awards National Cartoonists Society Award, various Alley Awards. Expanded list.
Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). Art by Carmine Infantino and Steve Leialoha.
Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). Art by Carmine Infantino and Steve Leialoha.

Carmine Infantino (born May 24, 1925) is an American comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. He was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2000. May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Brooklyn (named for the Dutch city Breukelen) is one of the five boroughs of New York City. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Link titleBold textI love Dana and she is my whole world!!!! ... Editing may also refer to audio or film editing. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... The Eisner Award logo‎ The Will Eisner Comic Industry Award is given for creative achievement in comic books. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Carmine Infantino was born in Brooklyn, New York City. Brooklyn (named for the Dutch city Breukelen) is one of the five boroughs of New York City. ... New York, NY redirects here. ...


He attended Public Schools 75 and 85 in Brooklyn before going on the High School of Industrial Arts (now the High School of Art and Design) in Manhattan. During his freshman year of high school, Infantino began working for the quirkily named Harry "A" Chesler, whose studio was one of a handful of comic-book "packagers" who created complete comics for publishers looking to enter the emerging field in the 1930s-1940s Golden Age of Comic Books. As Infantino recalled [1]: The High School of Art and Design is a Career and Technical Education high school located at 1075 Second Avenue, between 56th and 57th Streets in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Harry A. Chesler, Jr. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ...

I used to go around as a youngster into companies, go in and try to meet people -- nothing ever happened. One day I went to this place on 23rd Street, this old broken-down warehouse, and I met Harry Chesler. Now, I was told he was a mean guy and he used people and he took artists. But he was very sweet to me. He said, 'Look, kid. You come up here, I'll give you a dollar a day, just study art, learn, and grow.' That was damn nice of him, I thought. He did that for me for a whole summer.

Infantino, who also attended night classes at the Art Students League, became an art assistant at Quality Comics the following summer. Later, at Timely Comics, the Golden Age precursor of Marvel, Infantino got his first job drawing comics. With friend and high-school classmate Frank Giacoia penciling, Infanto inked the debut of the feature "Jack Frost" in USA Comics #1 (Aug. 1941). Infantino would eventually work for several publishers during the decade, drawing Airboy and the Heap for Hillman Periodicals; working for packager Jack Binder, who supplied Fawcett Comics; briefly at Holyoke; then landing at DC Comics, where he became a regular atist of the Golden Age Flash, Black Canary, Green Lantern and Justice Society of America. The Art Students League is the name of several American art schools or associations for promotion of art education For the New-York-based school (founded 1875), presumed model for the others, see Art Students League of New York For the Denver-based school and association, see Art Students League... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Marvel Comics (Stan Lee is behind many of the superheros) is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Frank Giacoia (1925-1989) is an American comic book artist who sometimes worked under the name Frank Ray and to a lesser extent Phil Zupa and the single moniker Espoia. ... In producing a comic book, the penciller (or penciler) draws the comic based on the script created by the writer. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... Airboy was a wartime comic book created by Charles Biro, that was first published by Hillman Periodicals in 1942. ... A character in the fictional comic book, Spawn who is a walking pile of trash and earth. ... Alex L. Hillmans line of magazines also included People Today (August 11, 1954) Hillman Periodicals was a publishing firm founded in 1938 by Alex L. Hillman, a onetime New York book publisher. ... Whiz Comics #2, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, the companys most popular character. ... Holyoke is a city located in Hampden County, Massachusetts, on the banks of the Connecticut River. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Black Canary is a DC Comics superheroine character. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ...


During the 1950s, Infantino freelanced for Joe Simon and Jack Kirby's company, Prize Comics, drawing the series Charlie Chan, which in particular shows the influence both of Kirby's and Milton Caniff's art styles. Back at DC, during a lull in the popularity of superheroes, Infantino drew Westerns, mysteries, science fiction comics. As his style evolved, he began to shed both the Kirbyisms and the gritty shading of Caniff, and develop a clean, linear style. Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books. ... Crestwood Publications, also known as Prize Comics and Feature Publications, was a comic book publisher from the 1940s through the 1960s, though most of their titles were published in the 1950s. ... 1938 titlecard Number One Sons with the seat of his pants on fire (in the film) Charlie Chan is a fictional Chinese-Hawaiian detective created by Earl Derr Biggers, reportedly in part under inspiration from the career of Chang Apana. ... Milton Arthur Paul Caniff (February 28, 1907-May 3, 1988) was an American cartoonist most famous for Terry and the Pirates. ... For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode, see Super Hero (Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode). ... i like western films The Western is an American genre in literature and film. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


The Silver Age

In 1956, DC editor Julius Schwartz assigned writer Robert Kanigher and artist Infantino to the company's first attempt at reviving superheroes: an updated version of the Flash that would appear in issue #4 (Oct. 1956) of the try-out series Showcase. Infantino designed the now-classic red uniform with yellow detail, striving to keep the costume as streamlined as possible, and he drew on his design abilities to create a new visual language to depict the Flash's speed, making the figure a red and yellow blur. The eventual success of the new, science-fictiony Flash heralded the wholesale return of superheroes, and the beginning of what fans and historians call the Silver Age of comics. Julius Schwartz, editor for DC Comics Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 - February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... A showcase is a performance or exhibit highlighting the work of a performer or group of performers, a particular culture or ethnic group, or of a nationality. ... Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man, one of the most significant new superheroes of the Silver Age The Silver Age of Comic Books is an informal name for a period of artistic advancement and commercial success in mainstream American comic books, predominantly of the superhero genre...

Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956): The Silver Age starts. Art by Carmine Infantino and Joe Kubert.
Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956): The Silver Age starts. Art by Carmine Infantino and Joe Kubert.

Infantino continued to work for Schwartz in his other features and titles, most notably "Adam Strange" in Mystery In Space, replacing Mike Sekowsky who did the penciling in Showcase 17-19. In 1964, Schwartz was made responsible for reviving the faded Batman titles. Writer John Broome and artist Infantino jettisoned the sillier aspects that had crept into the series (such as (Ace the Bathound, and Bat-Mite) and gave the "New Look" Batman and Robin a more detective-oriented direction and sleeker draftsmanship that proved a hit combination. Other features and characters Infantino drew at DC include "The Space Museum", and Elongated Man Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Aces first appearance in Batman #92, June 1955 The comic book character Ace the Bat-Hound was the canine crime-fighting partner of Batman and Robin in DC Comics of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ...


For his work in this period, he tied for the 1958 National Cartoonists Society award for the Comic Book Division. The National Cartoonists Society is an organization of professional cartoonists created in 1946. ...


After Wilson McCoy, the artist of The Phantom comic strip, died, Infantino finished one of his last stories. Infantino was a candidate for taking over the Phantom Sunday strip after McCoy's death, but the job was instead given to Sy Barry. Wilson McCoy is the second artist on the (still running) The Phantom comic strip. ... The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. ... Sy Barry at the drawing table. ...


DC Comics editorial director

In 1967, Infantino was tasked with designing covers for the entire DC line. When DC was sold to Kinney National Company, Infantino was promoted to editorial director. He started by hiring new talent, and promoting artists to editorial positions. He hired Dick Giordano away from Charlton Comics, and made artists Joe Orlando, Joe Kubert and Mike Sekowsky editors. New talents such as Neal Adams and Denny O'Neil were injected into the company. Kinney National Company was formed in 1966 when the Kinney Parking Company and the National Cleaning Company merged. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Joe Orlando was an illustrator, writer, editor and cartoonist who was born April 4, 1927, in Bari, Italy, and died December 23, 1998, in Manhattan. ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... Dennis ONeil (A.K.A. Denny ONeil) is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s. ...


Infantino was made publisher in 1971, during a time of declining circulation for DC's comics. Infantino attempted a number of changes, including the launch of starting several new titles. Older characters including Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Superman, Wonder Woman and, again, Batman were revamped to mixed results. A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Superman is a comic book superhero, originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ...


The same year he was made publisher, Infantino scored a major coup in signing on Marvel Comics' star artist, Jack Kirby. Beginning with Jimmy Olsen, Kirby created his Fourth World saga that wove through that existing title and three new series he created. With sales of his comics landing below expectations, however, the titles were eventually canceled and a few years later Kirby went back to working at Marvel Comics. Jimmy Olsen (full name James Bartholomew Olsen) is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Fourth World may mean: Fourth World, a term most commonly used to collectively describe notably marginalised or oppressed groups, in particular indigenous peoples, living in Third or First World countries. ...


In an effort to raise revenue, Infantino raised the cover price of DC's comics from 15 to 25 cents, simultaneously raising the page count by adding reprints and new backup features. Marvel met the price increase, then dropped back to 20 cents; Infantino stayed at 25 cents, a decision that ultimately proved bad for over-all sales.


After working with writer Mario Puzo on the Superman movie, Infantino collaborated with Marvel on the historic company-crossover publication Superman vs. Spider-Man. Yet before sales on that hit book had been recorded, Warner Communications replaced Infantino with Jenette Kahn, a person new to the comics field. Mr. Infantino returned to drawing freelance. Mario Gianluigi Puzo (October 15, 1920 – July 2, 1999) was an American author known for his novels about the Mafia, especially The Godfather (1969). ... Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel, Superman Superman, also known as Superman: The Movie, is a 1978 Warner Bros. ... Warner Communications, formerly Kinney National Company, was the parent company for Warner Bros. ... Jenette Kahn is an American comic book editor and executive. ...


Later career

Infantino later drew for a number of titles for Warren Publishing and Marvel, including the latter's Star Wars, Spider-Woman, and Nova. In the 1980s, he again drew the Flash for DC. As of 2005, Infantino is retired, although he is often a guest at comic book conventions. Vanguard Productions published his autobiography The Amazing World of Carmine Infantino (ISBN 1-887591-12-5). Warren Publishing is a magazine firm founded by James Warren, who published his first magazines in 1957 and continued in the business for decades. ... Opening logo to the Star Wars films Star Wars is an epic science fiction-fantasy saga and fictional universe created by writer/producer/director George Lucas during the late 1970s. ... The Teotihuacan Spider Woman was a goddess of the Pre-Columbian Teotihuacan civilization, in what is now Mexico. ... Nova, real name Richard Rider, is a fictional superhero from Marvel Comics. ...


Awards

Infantino's awards include:

The National Cartoonists Society is an organization of professional cartoonists created in 1946. ... The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... The Flash. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for writing comic books and co-creating numerous comics characters, especially for DC Comics. ... The Flash. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for writing comic books and co-creating numerous comics characters, especially for DC Comics. ... Mystery in Space was a science fiction comic book published by DC Comics from 1951 to 1966, and later in 1980/81 (issues #111-117). ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for writing comic books and co-creating numerous comics characters, especially for DC Comics. ... The Flash. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Murphy Anderson (born 1926) is an American comic book penciller and inker who has worked for companies such as DC Comics for over 50 years, starting in the 1930s-40s Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Strange Adventures was an American comic book published by DC Comics. ... Arnold Drake was an American writer of comic books notable for his work on Deadman, for which he was given the Bill Finger Award, and on Doom Patrol. ... Deadman is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in DC Comics. ... Strange Adventures was an American comic book published by DC Comics. ... Arnold Drake was an American writer of comic books notable for his work on Deadman, for which he was given the Bill Finger Award, and on Doom Patrol. ...

Trivia

Carmine Infantino is the uncle of Massachusetts musician Jim Infantino, of Jim's Big Ego. He contributed the cover art to their album They're Everywhere, which features a song about Barry Allen. Jim Infantino is an American singer/songwriter and leader of the band Jims Big Ego, as well as being a graphic designer, poet and stalwart of the Boston folk scene. ... Jims Big Ego is a Boston, Massachusetts-based band formed in 1995 under the leadership of singer/songwriter Jim Infantino. ... Example of book cover art. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ...


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Carmine Infantino - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1246 words)
Carmine Infantino (born May 24, 1925) is an American comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books.
Carmine Infantino was born in Brooklyn, New York City.
Infantino would eventually work for several publishers during the decade, drawing Airboy and the Heap for Hillman Periodicals; working for packager Jack Binder, who supplied Fawcett Comics; briefly at Holyoke; then landing at DC Comics, where he became a regular atist of the Golden Age Flash, Black Canary, Green Lantern and Justice Society of America.
Comic creator: Carmine Infantino (225 words)
Carmine Infantino attended both the School of Industrial Arts and the Art Students League in New York.
In 1950s Infantino changed his drawing style from angular and rough to a design strongly influenced by the fine-line illustrations of pulp artists Edd Cartier and Lou Fine.
Infantino's best work is the revived version of 'The Flash', which he drew for eleven years, from 1956 to 1967.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m