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Encyclopedia > Carlisle, Pennsylvania
Carlisle, Pennsylvania

Seal
Coordinates: 40°12′9″N 77°11′42″W / 40.2025, -77.195
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Cumberland
Founded 1751
Government
 - Mayor Kirk R. Wilson
Area
 - Borough  5.4 sq mi (14.1 km²)
Elevation  480 ft (146 m)
Population (2000)
 - Borough 17,970
 - Density 3,308.9/sq mi (1,277.8/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Incorporated in 1782
Website:www.carlislepa.org

Carlisle is a borough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, 18 miles (29 km) west by southwest of Harrisburg, the State capital. Carlisle is located within the Cumberland Valley, a highly productive agricultural region. As of the 2000 census, the borough population was 17,970. It is the county seatGR6 of Cumberland County. Image File history File links Carlisle_coat_of_arms. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... List of Pennsylvania counties: Pennsylvania counties Adams County, formed in 1800 from parts of York County. ... Cumberland County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania and is one of four counties comprising the greater Harrisburg metropolitan area. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... In Pennsylvania boroughs are one form of subdivisions of the counties. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... In Pennsylvania boroughs are one form of subdivisions of the counties. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Cumberland County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania and is one of four counties comprising the greater Harrisburg metropolitan area. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Location in Dauphin County and state of Pennsylvania Coordinates: , Country Commonwealth County Dauphin Incorporated 1791 Charter 1860 Government  - Mayor Stephen R. Reed (D) Area  - City  11. ... Counties comprising The Cumberland Valley Region The Cumberland Valley is a geographic region that lies between South Mountain and the Ridge and Valley Province of central Pennsylvania and western Maryland, United States. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Carlisle was laid out and settled by Scots-Irish immigrants in 1751 and became the center of their settlement in the Cumberland Valley. Carlisle was initially part of Lancaster County. Carlisle was incorporated as a borough on April 13, 1782. As authorized by a general borough law of 1851 (amended in 1852), the government is administered by a burgess and a borough council. Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1787 Carlisle was the scene of a riot instigated by Anti-Federalists in response to a planned march in favor of the US constitution. In 1794 during the Whiskey Rebellion, the troops of Pennsylvania and New Jersey assembled in Carlisle under the leadership of George Washington. The borough was shelled by the Confederates on July 1, 1863, during the Battle of Carlisle, part of the Gettysburg Campaign of the American Civil War. Carlisle was well-known at one time for the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, which trained Native Americans from all over the United States; one of its notable graduates was athletic hero Jim Thorpe. Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Anti-Federalist Party, though not a true political party, but a faction, left a major legacy on the country by initiating the Bill of Rights. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Whiskey Rebellion, less occasionally known as the Whiskey Insurrection, was a popular uprising that had its beginnings in 1791 and culminated in an insurrection in 1794 in the locality of Washington, Pennsylvania, in the Monongahela Valley. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William F. Smith Jeb Stuart Strength Federal militia (app. ... Meade and Lee of Gettysburg Gettysburg Campaign (through July 3); cavalry movements shown with dashed lines. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Carlisle Indian Industrial School, (1879 - 1918), in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the first federally supported school for Native Americans to be established off a reservation, was founded in 1879 by Richard Henry Pratt. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other persons named Jim Thorpe, see Jim Thorpe (disambiguation). ...


Carlisle is also home to Dickinson College, established in 1773 and later chartered in 1783, making it the first college founded in the newly recognized United States. The Dickinson School of Law, founded in 1834 and affiliated with Dickinson College until 1914, is the fifth oldest law school in the United States and the oldest law school in Pennsylvania. It remained independent for over 80 years, until it merged with The Pennsylvania State University in 1997, becoming the Penn State Dickinson School of Law. A mermaid sits atop Dickinson Colleges Old West. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and is the law school of The Pennsylvania State University. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... The Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and is the law school of Pennsylvania State University. ...


The U.S. Army War College, located at the Carlisle Barracks, caters to high-level military personnel and civilians and prepares them for strategic leadership responsibilities. The Carlisle Barracks is the oldest installation in the United States Army and Army's most senior military educational institution. Carlisle is home of the U.S. Army Military Heritage Museum. The United States Army War College is a United States Army school located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on the 500 acre (2 km²) campus of the historic Carlisle Barracks, a military post dating back to the 1770s. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


General Information

  • ZIP codes: 17013, 17015 (17015 was added July 1, 2006 due to "population expansion")
  • Area code: 717
  • Local phone code: 218, 226, 240, 241, 243, 245, 249, 254, 258, 374, 385, 386, 422, 440, 448, 486, 609, 701, 713, 960

Geography

Carlisle is located at 40°12′9″N, 77°11′42″W (40.202553, -77.195016).GR1


According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 14.1 km² (5.4 mi²), all land. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Demographics

Borough of Carlisle
Population by year [1]
1900 9,626
1910 10,303
1920 10,916
1940 13,984
1980 18,314
1990 18,419
2000 17,970

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 17,970 people, 7,426 households, and 4,010 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,277.8/km² (3,308.9/mi²). There were 8,032 housing units at an average density of 571.1/km² (1,479.0/mi²). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.93% White, 6.92% African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.60% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.71% from other races, and 1.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.96% of the population. Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 7,426 households out of which 23.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.3% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.0% were non-families. 39.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.81. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the borough the population was spread out with 18.6% under the age of 18, 17.2% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 84.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.8 males.


The median income for a household in the borough was $33,969, and the median income for a family was $46,588. Males had a median income of $34,519 versus $25,646 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,394. About 8.6% of families and 14.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.7% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Notable residents

Charles Albright (December 13, 1830–September 28, 1880) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... James Armstrong (August 29, 1748– May 6, 1828) was an American physician and politician from Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... American inventor, aviator, manufacturer of aircraft, boats, garden machinery and small automobiles (Cheston L. Eshelman Company, Eshelman Motors Corporation) (January 23, 1917 - November 7, 2004) (See Eshelman. ... Eshelman was a marque of small American automobiles (1953–1961) and other vehicles and implements including motor scooters, garden tractors, pleasure boats, aircraft, golf carts, snowplows, trailers, mail-delivery vehicles and more. ... Jeff Lebo (born October 5, 1966 in Enola, Pennsylvania) is the current head mens basketball coach at Auburn University. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 23,000 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... Marianne Moore photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Marianne Moore (December 11, 1887 - February 5, 1972) was a Modernist American poet and writer. ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Billy Eugene Owens (born May 1, 1969 in Carlisle, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball player. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Evolution of the rules of basketball 1895 The free throw line was officially placed 15. ... Molly Pitcher depicted in 1859 engraving Molly Pitcher was a nickname given to a woman who may have fought in the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants United States of America Great Britain Commanders George Washington Sir Henry Clinton Strength 11,000 10,000 Casualties 69 killed, 37 died of heat-stroke 160 wounded 95 missing Total: 361 65 killed 59 died of heat-stroke 170 wounded 50 captured 14 missing Total: 358 The Battle of... This article is about military actions only. ... Samuel Smith Samuel Smith (July 27, 1752 - April 22, 1839) was a United States Senator and Representative from Maryland, as well as a former mayor of Baltimore, Maryland, and a general in the Maryland Militia. ... Maryland ratified the Constitution on April 28, 1788. ... Map The Fifth Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... Map The Fourth Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... For other persons named Jim Thorpe, see Jim Thorpe (disambiguation). ... Frederick Watts (May 9, 1801- August 17, 1889), is called the “Father of Penn State University” [1] and was a prominent agricultural reformer, lawyer and businessman who headed the U.S. Department of Agriculture as Commissioner of Agriculture from 1881-1876 under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... James Wilson (September 14, 1742 – August 21, 1798), was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, twice elected to the Continental Congress, a major force in the drafting of the nations Constitution, a leading legal theoretician and one of the six original justices appointed by George Washington to the... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ...

Colleges and universities

A mermaid sits atop Dickinson Colleges Old West. ... The Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and is the law school of Pennsylvania State University. ... The United States Army War College is a U. S. Army school located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, specifically in the historic Carlisle Barracks. ...

Other

Carlisle is famous to many people for its car shows, put on regularly by Carlisle Events throughout the spring, summer, and fall at the Carlisle Fairgrounds. In addition to normal shows there are speciality shows, among which are GM, Ford, Chrysler, Import/Kit Car and truck shows. Carlisle is also the home of Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet (CPYB)


Carlisle also is home of the headquarters of the Giant Food supermarkets in Pennsylvania A GIANT of Carlisle Supermarket in Shillington, Pennsylvania. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c (1963) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (757 words)
Carlisle is a borough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, 18 miles (29 km) west by southwest of Harrisburg, the State capital.
Carlisle was laid out and settled by Scots-Irish immigrants in 1751 and became the center of their settlement in the Cumberland Valley.
Carlisle was incorporated as a borough on April 13, 1782.
Carlisle Indian Industrial School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (688 words)
Carlisle Indian Industrial School, (1879 - 1918), in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the first federally supported school for Native Americans to be established off a reservation, was founded in 1879 by Richard Henry Pratt.
Of the 15,000+ Indian children who attended the Carlisle school over its 39 year life span, almost all returned to the reservation; at the time, Indians were not generally permitted to live off of their reservation.
In 1892, when the Carlisle Indian School fielded its first football team, no one could have predicted that, in less than ten years, the Indians would become one of the dominant college football powers in the nation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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