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Encyclopedia > Carleton University

Coordinates: 45.383083454523° N 75.697583487551° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

This article is about the university in Ottawa, Ontario. For Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, USA, see Carleton College.
Carleton University

Motto: Ours the Task Eternal
Established 1942
Type: Public
Endowment: 214.7 Million CA$ [3]
Chancellor: Dr Marc Garneau
President: Dr Samy Mahmoud (pro tempore)
Staff: 3 568
Undergraduates: 20 907 [1]
Postgraduates: 2 932 [2]
Location Ottawa, Ontario
Campus: Urban, 62 hectares
Colors: Red and Black            
Nickname: Ravens
Mascot: Rodney the Raven
Affiliations: ASAIHL, APSIA
Website: http://www.carleton.ca

Carleton University is an international, comprehensive university located in Canada's capital of Ottawa, Ontario. Founded as a small college in 1942, Carleton now offers over 65 programs in a diverse range of disciplines, inter alia, public affairs, journalism, film studies, engineering, high technology, and international studies. More than 2 000 faculty members instruct some 23 000 students drawn from over 147 countries, studying for a Bachelor’s, Master’s or Doctoral degree. Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... Image File history File links CarletonUniversity. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Captain (Navy) Joseph Jean-Pierre Marc Garneau CC, CD, Ph. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Samy A. Mahmoud is the acting president of Carleton University, appointed in November, 2006, after the sudden resignation of David W. Atkinson. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning or ASAIHL is a non-governmental organization founded in 1956 to assist higher learning institutions in strengthening themselves through a mutual self help and to achieve international distinction in teaching, research and public service. ... The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) is an organization that works to advance internationa understanding, prosperity, peace and security through professional education in international affairs. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ...

The University is named after Carleton County, Ontario, which included the city of Ottawa at the time Carleton was founded. Carleton County, in turn, was named in honour of Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, an early Governor-General of British North America. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2938x3119, 1409 KB) Guy Carleton, half-length portrait, facing left. ... Carleton County is the name of an historic county in Ontario, Canada. ... Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester. ... British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ...


Past chancellors include two Nobel laureates; pioneering scientist Gerhard Herzberg and Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson, as well as six Order of Canada recipients. Astronaut Marc Garneau, the first Canadian to travel in space, is the current Chancellor of the University. The acting (pro tempore) President and Vice-Chancellor is Samy Mahmoud, the previous Vice-President (academic).[4] The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... Gerhard Herzberg (December 25, 1904 – March 3, 1999) was a pioneering theoretical chemist. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson, PC, CC, OM, MA (April 23, 1897 – December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country (Hebrews 11. ... Captain (Navy) Joseph Jean-Pierre Marc Garneau CC, CD, Ph. ...

Contents

History

I learned very early the life lesson that it is people, not buildings, that make up an institution. And if we put our hearts to it we can do something worthwhile. -- Henry Marshall Tory

Henry Marshall Tory, first President of Carleton College
Henry Marshall Tory, first President of Carleton College

Carleton College was founded in 1942 at the height of the Second World War by the Ottawa Association for the Advancement of Learning. It was originally located in a rented building and only offered night courses in public administration and introductory university subjects. When the war ended in 1945, the College began expanding to meet the needs of veterans coming home. The Faculty of Arts and Science was established, which included courses in journalism and first-year engineering. In 1946 the college moved to The Glebe neighbourhood along First Avenue at the former Ottawa Ladies' College. Its first degrees were conferred in 1946 to graduates of its programs in Journalism and Public Administration. For nearly a decade the College operated on a shoestring budget, funds raised mainly through community initiatives and modest student fees. However, due to the war, student fees were kept low as Carleton gave special grants to veterans returning home who wished to continue their studies. The faculty was composed largely of part-time professors who worked full-time in the Public Service; some of whom were convinced to leave for full-time tenure positions. However, full-time teaching staff were still mostly young scholars at the beginning of their careers. This faculty composition set a dynamic culture for Carleton which continues to pervade the University to this day. The faculty was dedicated to making education accessible for all students, while maintaining high academic standards of achievement. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Glebe is a neighbourhood in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... A veteran refers to a person who is experienced in a particular area, particularly referring to people in the armed forces. ... Public services is a term usually used to mean services provided by government to its citizens, either directly (through the public sector) or by financing private provision of services. ...

Leslie Frost, Premier of Ontario, laying the cornerstone of the Tory Building in 1957
Leslie Frost, Premier of Ontario, laying the cornerstone of the Tory Building in 1957

In 1952 the Carleton College Act was passed by the Ontario Legislature, changing the official corporate name to Carleton College and officially conferring the power to grant degrees. Carleton thus became the province's first private, non-sectarian college [5]. In the same year, the 62 hectare property nestled between the Rideau Canal and the Rideau River on which the current campus is located was acquired. Some of the land was donated by a prominent Ottawa businessman Harry Stevenson Southam. Construction began on the new campus in 1953. In 1957 the Carleton University Act, 1952 was amended, officially granting Carleton status as a university and thus changing its name to Carleton University. Carleton's motto, "Ours the Task Eternal," is taken from Walt Whitman's poem, Pioneers! O Pioneers!. [6] In 1959 construction was completed on the new campus, and Carleton moved to its current location. The original buildings included three that still stand today, the Maxwell MacOdrum Library, Norman Paterson Hall and the Henry Marshall Tory Building. Following this, Carleton rapidly expanded to meet the need for tertiary education in Canada. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 557 pixelsFull resolution (867 × 604 pixel, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Leslie Frost, the Premier of Ontario, laying the cornerstone of the Tory Building at Carleton University in 1957. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 557 pixelsFull resolution (867 × 604 pixel, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Leslie Frost, the Premier of Ontario, laying the cornerstone of the Tory Building at Carleton University in 1957. ... Leslie Miscampbell Frost, P.C., C.C., Q.C., LL.D., D.C.L. (September 20, 1895 – May 4, 1973) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Legislature Building at Queens Park The Legislative Assembly of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Locks in Summer The Rideau Canal, also known as the Rideau Waterway, connects the city of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on the Ottawa River to the city of Kingston, Ontario on Lake Ontario. ... rapids on the Rideau River opposite Carleton University The Rideau River is a Canadian river which flows north from Upper Rideau Lake and empties into the Ottawa River at Rideau Falls in Ottawa, Ontario. ... Harry Stevenson Southam (1875-1954) was a Canadian publisher of The Ottawa Citizen and Chancellor of Carleton University from 1952 to 1954. ... Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. ... Walt Whitman, aged 37, steel engraving by Samuel Hollyer Pioneers! O Pioneers! is a poem by the American poet Walt Whitman. ...


Academics

Carleton has become known for its unique range of programs that are often difficult to find in Canada. Notably, degrees in journalism, aerospace engineering, geomatics, interactive multimedia and design, European and Russian studies, network technology, international affairs, public policy and film studies. Carleton offers over 60 programs, highlights of which are included below.


Faculty of Public Affairs

Lester B. Pearson, Carleton's Nobel Peace Prize winning Chancellor from 1969 until his death in 1972
Lester B. Pearson, Carleton's Nobel Peace Prize winning Chancellor from 1969 until his death in 1972

The University's Faculty of Public Affairs offers a number of unique and highly regarded programs. Indeed, Carleton's first degrees were awarded in Journalism and Public Administration. Carleton's top-ranked Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA) offers Canada's only graduate programs in the field -- an MA, a combined MA and LLB (offered in conjunction with the University of Ottawa Law School), and a PhD in International Affairs. In a survey of 110 Canadian foreign affairs scholars published in Foreign Policy, Carleton's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs ranked 1st in Canada and 2nd in North America in schools offering Masters degrees in International Relations.[7] Carleton has a long standing tradition of conferring an honorary doctorate on each of the Secretaries General of the United Nations, beginning with Dag Hammarskjöld in 1954. The two shades of blue in Carleton's doctoral gown are in fact those of the UN and are meant to recognize the University's long-standing interest and expertise in international affairs. Carleton's unique Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs offers a Bachelor's degree in Public Affairs and Policy Management (Honours). The Institute of European and Russian Studies, which has been active in the field for over forty years, offers the most comprehensive range of courses in the country. It offers a BA (Honours) in European and Russian Studies and an MA in European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. In September 2006 Carleton was designated a European Union Centre of Excellence by the European Commission in Brussels. The Department of Law offers a BA (Honours) in Law; one of only three in Canada that takes an epistemic approach to legal studies. The Department of Political Science was ranked 1st in 2006 amongst Canadian comprehensive universities based on total publications and citations by Research Infosource Inc.[8] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 461 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 1041 pixel, file size: 320 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chancellor of Carleton University, former Prime Minister Lester Pearson. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 461 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 1041 pixel, file size: 320 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chancellor of Carleton University, former Prime Minister Lester Pearson. ... Mike Pearson redirects here. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The School is located in Dunton Tower. ... Fauteux Hall, the location of the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs is a school at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada) that offers an undergraduate degree in Public Affairs and Policy Management (B.PAPM). ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... 1. ...


Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences offers degrees in all the standard areas, including Film Studies, Philosophy, Art History, Psychology and Sociology. Some of the more specilized offerings include a Combined BA (Honours) interdisciplinary degree in Human Rights. This degree leads to a Major in Human Rights, as well as second Major in another field, such as Law, Philosophy, Political Science or Sociology and Anthropology. The four-year Bachelor of Humanities program is also unique in North America.[9] Carleton's Institute of Cognitive Science is currently offering the first dedicated, fully structured BA and PhD program in Cognitive Science in the country. For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Sprott School of Business

BIB year abroad in Shanghai
BIB year abroad in Shanghai

Carleton's Sprott School of Business was the first in Canada to offer a Bachelor of International Business (BIB). This program includes a mandatory language component and the third year is spent abroad. Possible year-abroad locations include Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Chile, China, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Peru or Spain. In addition to the standard Canadian-taught MBA are two international MBA programs designed for international students. This special program are offered to students in Tehran, Iran and Shanghai, China in collaboration with a local university. Most courses are taught by Carleton professors who travel to Tehran and Shanghai. There is a study abroad portion of this program, which is taught in Ottawa at the Sprott School of Business. Sprott's principle undergraduate offering, however, is the 4-year Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) degree. It is designed to be flexible, allowing a variety of Concentrations and opportunities for Co-operative education (Co-Op). The ability for a student to take either one or two concentrations in a range of subjects (e.g.: Accounting, Finance, Information Systems, International Business, Management, Marketing) makes the BCom degree very agile in meeting students educational and career goals. The Eric Sprott School of Business is a faculty of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 183 KB) Shanghai Pudong Photo by Hector Garcia, CC License. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 183 KB) Shanghai Pudong Photo by Hector Garcia, CC License. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tehran (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Cooperative education is a structured method of combining academic education with practical work experience. ...


Faculty of Engineering and Design

Mural in the foyer of the Tory Building, circa. 1958

The Faculty of Engineering and Design is another strong point of the University. Founded in 1973 by Carleton's factory , Carleton's Industrial Design program is the oldest in Canada, and is the only one leading to a university-level degree in the country. Carleton also offers one of only two fully dedicated Aerospace Engineering Bachelor's degree programs in Canada. The program avails itself of an extensive network of well-equipped laboratories encompassing the entire scope of mechanical and aerospace engineering sciences, including rapid prototyping facilities. In 2006, Carleton became one of only three Universities in Canada to offer both a Bachelor's (Honours) and a Master's degree in Biomedical Engineering. The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering features a state-of-the-art structures lab, a High Performance Computing Laboratory and is home to the Advanced Geotechnical Research Laboratory, which is one of the most comprehensively equipped geotechnical research facilities in Canada. The Department of Electronics features an Anechoic chamber, Photonics Research Laboratory, NeuroModeler Laboratory, Sun/Unix Network and an Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory housed in an ISO 5 cleanroom. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (966 × 724 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mural in Tory Building, Carleton University, as it was in 1958 just after compleation. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (966 × 724 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mural in Tory Building, Carleton University, as it was in 1958 just after compleation. ... Industrial design is an applied art whereby the aesthetics and usability of products may be improved for marketability and production. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft, and related topics. ... A rapid prototyping machine using Selective laser sintering. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... A picture of an anechoic chamber An anechoic chamber is a room that is isolated from external sound or electromagnetic radiation sources, sometimes using sound proofing, and prevents the reflection of wave phenomena (reverberation). ... NASAs Glenn Research Center cleanroom. ...


Faculty of Science

Carleton University campus as seen from the south.
Carleton University campus as seen from the south.

Carleton's Faculty of Science is well-equipped to conduct scientific investigations in a sophisticated environment. The Department of Biology is equipped to allow students to carry out contemporary procedures in experimental biology including all aspects of molecular genetics such as gene splicing, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing; ultracentrifugation; various types of electrophoresis, tissue culture; phase contrast, polarizing, interference and fluorescent light microscopy among others. The Department of Earth Science maintains its own JEOL JSM-6400 digital scanning electron microscope, Camebax MBX electron microprobe, ThermoFinnigan Triton TI thermal ionization mass spectrometer and a Philips X-ray powder diffractometer. The Department of Physics is home to the KEG research computing system, which consists of a 100+ CPU Linux cluster complete with multiple storage arrays totalling more than 10 Terabytes. The Department of Physics was also ranked 1st in Canada in citations per paper (highest impact) from 2000-2004 by Science Watch newsletter, published by Thomson Scientific, which uses university science indicators to examine the research of 46 Canadian universities in 21 different scientific fields. The Herzberg Laboratories building is equipped with roof-top observatory housing a 14 inch reflecting Celestron telescope which is used in first-year Astronomy courses. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1232 pixel, file size: 506 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Carleton University from the south. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1232 pixel, file size: 506 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Carleton University from the south. ... Molecular genetics is the field of biology which studies the structure and function of genes at a molecular level. ... Genetic engineering, genetic modification (GM), and gene splicing (once in widespread use but now deprecated) are terms for the process of manipulating genes in an organism, usually outside of the organisms normal reproductive process. ... “PCR” redirects here. ... The term DNA sequencing encompasses biochemical methods for determining the order of the nucleotide bases, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, in a DNA oligonucleotide. ... Differential centrifugation is a procedure in which the homogenate is subjected to repeated centrifugations each time increasing the centrifugal force. ... For specific types of electrophoresis (for example, the process of administering medicine, iontophoresis), see electrophoresis (disambiguation). ... Tissue culture refers to the growth of tissues and/or cells separate from the organism. ... An electron microscope is a type of microscope that uses electrons as a way to illuminate and create an image of a specimen. ... A microprobe is an instrument that applies a stable and well-focused beam of charged particles (electrons or ions) to a sample. ... Mass spectrometry is a technique for separating ions by their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios. ... A single crystal diffractometer A Diffractometer (Main Entry: dif·frac·tom·e·ter Pronunciation: di-frak-tä-m&-t&r Function: noun) is a measuring instrument for analyzing the structure of a usually crystalline substance from the scattering pattern produced when a beam of radiation or particles (as X rays... A terabyte is a unit of measurement in computers. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ...


The mineral Carletonite is named after the university, one of the few universities with that honour.


Learning environment

A typical multimedia classroom at Carleton
A typical multimedia classroom at Carleton

The typical classroom at Carleton is a very modern affair. Facilities can be divided into three types depending on size: Lecture Halls, Classrooms and Seminar rooms. Lecture Halls and larger Classrooms are equipped with a high resolution LCD projector, a networked computer terminal with LCD screen and USB port (for uploading files), a DVD/CD player, stereo sound system, laptop video connection, and Wireless networking. Newer rooms have dedicated laptop power outlets located throughout to allow students to plug-in their computers. Two projection screens are installed, allowing for simultaneous use of the LCD video projector and traditional overhead projector or other media device. Overhead lighting is switched in zones and/or dimmable to facilitate multimedia presentations. Seminar rooms are similar to classrooms, though usually somewhat smaller and with tables arrange around the periphery of the room, and may not have permanent media facilities installed. Satellite video conference and television feeds are available in 90 locations throughout campus. A dedicated video conference facility seating 47 is located on the sixth level of Southam Hall. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1632 × 1232 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1632 × 1232 pixel, file size: 1. ...


Carleton's campus was the subject of art exhibit conceived by local artist Adrian Gröllner. The MODERN U. project sought to highlight the late modernist architecture exemplified by many of Carleton's early buildings. Modern architecture is a broad term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament, that first arose around 1900. ...

Carleton University is quintessentially modern. The symmetry, earth colours and deliberate non-monumentality of its early architecture betray the egalitarian sensibilities of its founders. Indeed, Carleton was to be a new sort of university, one not dogged by class and the trappings of old, but one built for the people, one built for the future. - Excerpt from the MODERN U. website.

Reputation

The mean admission grade for 2006 undergraduate entry was 81.7% or an A- in high school studies. Carleton has been included in a number of Canadian and international college and university rankings. Such studies must necessarily make subjective judgements as to criteria and methodology. As such they should be read with a certain level of statistical literacy: In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... Statistical literacy is a term used to describe an individuals ability to understand statistics. ...

  • The Gourman Report, compiled by Dr Jack Gourman of the Princeton Review, ranks Carleton University 7th out of 60 universities in Canada.
  • Carleton University's Department of Physics is ranked 1st in Canada in citations per paper (highest impact) from 2000-2004 by Science Watch newsletter, published by Thomson Scientific, which uses university science indicators to examine the research of 46 Canadian universities in 21 different scientific fields.
  • The Department of Political Science is ranked 1st amongst Canadian comprehensive universities based on total publications and citations by Research Infosource Inc.[11]
  • Carleton was not among 15 Canadian schools ranked in the top 200 Economics programs worldwide, according to research output, as reported in a study by Kalaitzidakis et al. [12]
The Rideau Canal in front of Carleton University, at dawn
The Rideau Canal in front of Carleton University, at dawn

Carleton was known for admitting a high portion of undergraduate applicants; however, since the early 1990s the admissions focus has changed considerably. William Edwin Beckel, President and Vice-Chancellor of Carleton from 1979 to 1989, had faith that many high school students with poor academic records, who often came from underprivileged backgrounds, would blossom at university. Beckel believed that "Every student should have the right to fail."[14] Today, the mean undergraduate admissions average is just under 82%, or an A- in High School studies.[15] // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... The School is located in Dunton Tower. ... Foreign affairs redirects here. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1232, 400 KB) By: Chris BARBARA. Of: The Canal I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1232, 400 KB) By: Chris BARBARA. Of: The Canal I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Locks in Summer The Rideau Canal, also known as the Rideau Waterway, connects the city of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on the Ottawa River to the city of Kingston, Ontario on Lake Ontario. ... William Edwin Beckel is a Canadian academic and former president of Carleton University in Ottawa and the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. ...


Many undergraduates find it difficult to retain their scholarship, adding to their financial burden. Only 18 percent of Carleton students retain their scholarship which has prompted Carleton's administration to consider lowering the CGPA necessary to maintain an award from year to year.[16] At Carleton, a CGPA of 10 out of 12 points (equivalent to an A-), is necessary to maintain a scholarship.


Carleton has also turned around its financial situation, resulting in many improvements on campus. These include, inter alia, the $30 million construction of new athletics facilities and the $22 million, 9 011 m² (97 000 ft²) Human Computer Interaction (HCI) Institute Facility and Centre for Advanced Studies in Visualization and Simulation (V-SIM). More well-known, perhaps, is the $17 million upgrade and expansion to the University Centre. In the fall of 2007, construction of a new residence building began.


Libraries

Carleton is home to a number of specialty libraries, in addition to the three-million volume MacOdrum Library. The MacOdrum Library, named in honour of Carleton University’s second president Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum, contains a collection of more than two million items — books, microfiche, tapes, CDs, government documents, maps, periodicals and archival materials — as well as study space, reading rooms and a miniature Starbucks café. // Reputation The library...


Maxwell MacOdrum Library

Carleton President and Vice-Chancellor Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum, left, with Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel Laureate
Carleton President and Vice-Chancellor Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum, left, with Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel Laureate

Named in honour of former Carleton President and Vice-Chancellor Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum, Carleton's premier collection includes more than three million books, journals, government documents, maps, newspapers, music scores, CDs, microforms, archives and rare materials. In addition, Carleton subscribes to numerous specialty electronic information sources, which are playing an ever increasing role in student scholarship at the University. Image File history File links Maxwell_MacOdrum. ... Image File history File links Maxwell_MacOdrum. ... Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum (b. ... Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum (b. ...


The Learning Commons provides students with access to all the research facilities and resource support of the main Library, along with contemporary technology. Services include Wireless networking (University intranet and high-speed internet), 160 networked computers, laser printers, photocopy machines and Laptop Loans; all set in a variety of custom designed ergonomic study spaces. Private desks with LCD monitor-equipped computers, group study rooms, and comfortable reading chairs are available to all students until 02h00 every day.


The Government Documents Collection contains official publications from all levels of government and international organizations in print, microform and digital formats.


The Map Collection consists of topographic and thematic sheet maps, air photos, digital orthophotographs and geospatial data files for use with GIS and drawing software.


The Data Centre collects microdata and public opinion surveys, including those from Statistics Canada, Gallup, POLLARA and the Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research.


The Special Collections & Archives is responsible for the Library’s Special Collections, the Carleton University Historical Collection and the Library’s own Archives.


Notable possessions include:

London: Printed for C. Hitch and L. Hawes...[et. al.], 1757
  • Paradise regain'd: a poem in four books: to which is added Samson agonistes; :and Poems upon several occasions.
London: Printed for J. and R. Tonson...[et. al.], 1753
London: Printed for J. and R. Tonson, 1758
Species plantarum, first edition
Species plantarum, first edition
There is also a rare 1609 edition of The Faerie Queen in the collection
  • 800 contemporary pamphlets of the French Revolution and Moniteur universal, le Journal officiel de la République français.
  • A collection of 52 titles, chiefly on natural science and botany, almost half being published from the 16th to the 18th centuries. inter alia, titles by Adanson, Aldrovandi, Dalechamps, Ray, Lindley, Gesner, Gray, and Traill. Many are first editions, some in original bindings, illustrated with woodcuts and engravings. A highlight is a first edition of Linnaeus’Species plantarum”.
  • The Batchinsky collection, an extensive collection of over half a million items dealing with 19th and 20th century Ukrainian history and politics up to World War II.
  • The Novosti Collection, a collection of 70 000 photographs, briefing notes, speech drafts, press releases, newspaper clippings and some pamphlets which was acquired from the former Soviet press agency Novosti in Ottawa. The collection covers the Soviet Union and Soviet society from 1917 to 1991 and USSR - Canada relations since World War II.

For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... Paradise Regaind is a poem by the 17th century English poet John Milton, published in 1671. ... Una and the Lion by Briton Rivière The Faerie Queene is a poem by Edmund Spenser, first published in 1590 (the first half) with the more or less complete version being published in 1596. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x816, 58 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Carleton University Species Plantarum ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x816, 58 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Carleton University Species Plantarum ... Writing the Species Plantarum was one of Carolus Linnaeus two great contributions to the Scientific community. ... Michel Adanson. ... Ulisse Aldrovandi Ulisse Aldrovandi (11 September 1522 - 10 November 1605) was an Italian naturalist, the moving force behind Bolognas botanical garden, one of the first in Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Lindley (February 8, 1799 - November 1, 1865) was an English botanist. ... Conrad Gessner (Konrad Gessner, Conrad von Gesner, Conradus Gesnerus) (26 March 1516-13 December 1565) was a Swiss naturalist. ... Dr. Thomas Stewart Traill (October 29, 1781- July 30, 1862) was a Scottish professor of medical jurisprudence at the University of Edinburgh. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Writing the Species Plantarum was one of Carolus Linnaeus two great contributions to the Scientific community. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Audio Visual Resource Centre

Located on the fourth level of St. Patrick's Building, this Centre serves the School for Studies in Art and Culture. This includes Art History, Film Studies, Music and Sonic Design.


The Centre houses a large collection of films (16mm, DVD, Laserdisc and VHS); a Slide and CD Collection Room; an Audiovisual Study Room and Computer Lab; course reserves, and staff that can provide students with specialized research assistance. There are also two photocopy machines available to students, along with some basic office supplies.


European and Russian Studies Resource Centre

The EURUS Centre houses a large collection of European, Russian and Eurasian-centred material that support the work of the Department. It is located on the 13th level of Dunton Tower. Collections include:

  • Course reserves
  • International newspapers
  • Theses and master's research projects
  • Honours research projects and essays
  • About 325 periodicals, both general interest and specialist
    • inter alia: Business Central Europe, Canada-Ukraine Monitor, Canadian Slavonic papers, CIS Environmental Watch, Croatian International Relations Review, Economics of Transition, Environmental Policy Review, Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, Human Rights Quarterly, Interflo, International Affairs, Kommersant, New Hungarian Quarterly, RFE (several series), The Economist, Ukrainian Quarterly, NATO Weekly Press Review
  • Several hundred ‘pamphlets’ (working papers, occasional papers, government documents, NGO publications, et cætera.)
    • inter alia: Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board Documentation Centre, CSIS, CSCE, Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly, EBRD, Hungarian Academy of Science, Institute of Finance Warsaw, IMF, Catholic University of Leuven, International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, OECD, Osteuropa-Institutet, Hoover Institute Stanford University, UNCTAD, UN Institute for Disarmament Research, US National Defence College, Vienna Institute for Comparative Economic Studies, and WIDER

Student life

Culture

Rideau River as seen from Carleton University
Rideau River as seen from Carleton University

The atmosphere at Carleton is generally quite relaxed and easy-going. In a sense typically Canadian, both students and instructors go about their business with a notable lack of pretension. Interaction between students and instructors is usually informal, though when addressing an instructor, academic titles are still commonly used. Rideau River This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder. ... Rideau River This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder. ... rapids on the Rideau River opposite Carleton University The Rideau River is a Canadian river which flows north from Upper Rideau Lake and empties into the Ottawa River at Rideau Falls in Ottawa, Ontario. ...


The school mascot is the Raven and the student newspaper is The Charlatan, which celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2005. The school also publishes a newspaper for residence students, The Resin. During the school year the School of Journalism publishes a community newspaper, Centretown News, which reports on the Centretown neighbourhood of Ottawa, and an online newspaper, Capital News Online, as well as producing Midweek, a 90-minute current affairs radio show which is broadcast to the city. There is also the student-run writers' zine, In/Words, which is sponsored by the Department of English Language and Literature, as well as The Iron Times, published by the Carleton Student Engineering Society. Carleton is home to a community radio station, CKCU-FM. Broadcasting for the first time on 14 November 1975, CKCU-FM was the first licensed community-based campus radio station in Canada. While Carleton does not have a theatre department, its Sock 'n' Buskin Theatre Company[17] was founded two years after the founding of the university, in 1943. For other uses, see Raven (disambiguation). ... // Summary The Charlatan is the name of the student campus newspaper (ISSN 0315-1859) published at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario by a non-profit corporation, Charlatan Publications Inc. ... Centretown News is a newspaper in Ottawa published by Carleton Universitys school of journalism, distributed to the neighbourhood north of the school, called Centretown. ... Centretown is a neighbourhood in Ottawa, Canada. ... Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting material that is popular to a local audience but is overlooked by more powerful broadcast groups. ... CKCU is a Canadian campus radio station, broadcasting at 93. ... Sock ‘N’ Buskin (abbreviated to S ‘n’ B) is a student-run, community-based theatre company, located at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Student accommodations

Carleton has nine Houses of Residences are available. The Houses -- all named for counties in Eastern Ontario -- are Dundas, Glengarry, Grenville, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Renfrew, Russell, and Stormont. They are inter-connected and linked to the rest of the University by Carleton's tunnel system. Carleton has a sizable residence community, the majority of whom are first year students. They are represented by Rideau River Residence Association (RRRA, usually pronounced 'raw'). Eastern Ontario is the region of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies in a wedge-shaped area between the Ottawa and St. ...

Carleton University as seen from the Rideau River
Carleton University as seen from the Rideau River

The bulk of upper-year students, however, live off-campus. A popular off-campus housing estate is the four-building high-rise Prince of Wales Complex on nearby Prince of Wales Drive. The footpath running along the Rideau Canal can usually be seen crowded with students walking the 2km to Carleton. Carelton University, Ottawa, ON, August 2004, seen over the Rideau River, from Bronson Ave. ... Carelton University, Ottawa, ON, August 2004, seen over the Rideau River, from Bronson Ave. ... rapids on the Rideau River opposite Carleton University The Rideau River is a Canadian river which flows north from Upper Rideau Lake and empties into the Ottawa River at Rideau Falls in Ottawa, Ontario. ... Prince of Wales Drive (Ottawa Road #73) is a road serving Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Locks in Summer The Rideau Canal, also known as the Rideau Waterway, connects the city of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on the Ottawa River to the city of Kingston, Ontario on Lake Ontario. ...


Going east of the school gives students the option of renting a (usually) vintage house in The Glebe, one of the city's trendier neighbourhoods. From there it is usually only a short walk to campus. Though further afield, students also often rent in Centretown and downtown neighbourhoods. The Glebe is a neighbourhood in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... Centretown is a neighbourhood in Ottawa, Canada. ...


Carleton is connected to the rest of the city by multiple transport links. In addition to regular bus service, there is a dedicated light rail station connecting the University to Ottawa's O-Train network. A permanent BlueLine taxi-cab stand is also available outside of the University Commons building. The O-Train at Carleton University. ...


Athletics

The Carleton University Physical Recreation Centre (PRC) - the largest facility of its kind in Canada - is a multi-use complex that offers a wide variety of training programs and services to accommodate every athlete - from beginner to professional. Image File history File links Carletonravens. ...


Carleton is home to Keith Harris Stadium where the Ottawa Fury Soccer team plays. Keith Harris Stadium at Carleton University is a grass field stadium located in Ottawa, Ontario, on the North-Eastern edge of the Carleton University campus, where Bronson Ave. ... The Ottawa Fury is a soccer (football) club operating in Ottawa, Canada. ...


The University is represented in Canadian Interuniversity Sport by the Carleton Ravens. The men's basketball team has won the CIS championships for five consecutive years (2002-2007). Carleton is second only to the University of Victoria for the most wins. The Vikes have seven consecutive wins in the 1980's. CIS Logo. ... The Carleton Ravens are the athletic teams that represent Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... The University of Victoria (usually known as UVic, though originally as U of V) is located in Greater Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (northeast of Victoria). ... The Victoria Vikes are the athletic teams that represent the University of Victoria of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada in Canadian Interuniversity Sport. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Rivalry with the University of Ottawa

Since Carleton's inception the student body has encouraged a crosstown rivalry with the University of Ottawa. The rivalry has gained ground recently as the Carleton Ravens basketball team was defeated for only the second time in three years during league play by the University of Ottawa Gee-Gees on 17 January 2006. It is not uncommon to hear a profane and explicit song sung about Carleton's good natured dislike for the urban campus of the University of Ottawa and their ambiguous mascot, the Gee-Gee. This song is an integral part of student culture and passed down to every matriculating class during frosh week. For the university in Ottawa, Kansas, see Ottawa University. ... The matriculation ceremony at Oxford Matriculation refers to the formal process of entering a university, or of becoming eligible to enter by acquiring the required prior qualifications. ...

Dunton Tower, the tallest structure on campus

When Carleton University had a football team, the annual Ravens-Gee Gees match was held in Frank Clair Stadium at Lansdowne Park. This was known as the "Panda Game." Notably, Canadian comic and former Ottawa resident Norm MacDonald attended the Panda Game and discussed his experience on the Late Show with David Letterman. Audio recordings of this are perennially circulated and played to incoming freshman at both the University of Ottawa and Carleton. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1478x2476, 128 KB) Summary Dunton Tower at Carleton University from southeast Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Carleton University ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1478x2476, 128 KB) Summary Dunton Tower at Carleton University from southeast Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Carleton University ... Categories: Buildings and structures stubs | Stadiums | Ottawa buildings | Canadian football venues ... Norman Gene Macdonald (born October 17, 1963) is a Canadian actor and comedian. ... Late Show redirects here. ...


University traditions

  • Climbing to the top of Dunton Tower

One of the campus traditions is to climb all 22 flights of stairs to the top of the tallest building on campus. The Tower is also known as "Isengard" due to its size and the fact that many TAs have their offices situated in it. Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ...

  • The Alumni Park fountain

Students often jump into the Alumni Park fountain in front of the administrative building, Robertson Hall, during convocation despite generally being warned that the water is dyed blue. The fountain is turned on during the summer months.


Carleton Underground

The tunnel system

The entire University is connected by an elaborate five kilometre network of heated underground tunnels adorned with murals created by student groups. Students are encouraged, within reason, to create their own works of art. Each floor of the nine residence halls paint a tunnel mural near the end of each school year. It is not uncommon to see students wearing pajamas in class, having come directly from bed in residence. Sky-lit or windowed student lounges and snack-shops can be found at various points along the tunnel system. Students often hold competitions to determine who can remain "submerged" in tunnel-life (that is, moving about using only the tunnel system), especially during the frigid winter months.


Oliver's

Oliver's, or "Ollie's" (named after former President Michael Oliver) is the more well known of the campus pubs. With a generally more party atmosphere than Mike's Place, Oliver's is the venue for many high profile entertainment events throughout the year, and hosts regular weekday and weekend night events. All Ages events are no longer common after Oliver's rebuilding operations in 2006, and nearly all events are 19+, making some first-year students feel frustrated that they cannot take part in the social life of their university. Oliver's has a menu of principally North American foods, including University mainstays like burgers, fries, chicken fingers, as well as other light meals.


Oliver's begins serving alcohol at 11:00 am, and it is common to see students studying alone or in small groups while having a pint or a meal between classes. During the day Oliver's is generally pretty quiet and relaxed, with only background music, and it is a favoured place of study for those capable of tuning out distractions.


Oliver's underwent an extensive renovation in the Summer of 2006 and was reopened with a new industrial look the first week of October. The bar now features two plasma screen televisions, one big screen rear-projection television and other mid-sized sets throughout the venue. The bar also has a brand new patio.


Oliver's was the centre of student protests over the reduction of student space on campus. On 21 April 2005 protesters occupied Oliver's patio to prevent it from being torn apart to make way for a new university bookstore. The Carleton University Students' Association (CUSA) came to an agreement with the University and the protest ended. The agreement is colloquially known as "Oliver's clause".[18] The Carleton University Students Association (or CUSA) is a non-profit corporation that represents the undergraduate students at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. ...


In late October 2007, Oliver's had its liquor license revoked for 40 days as the result of overserving. A Liquor license is a permit to sell alcoholic beverages. ...


Mike's Place

Long considered the exclusive domain of graduate students, Mike's Place (named after former Liberal Prime Minister and former Carleton Chancellor Lester "Mike" Pearson) has quickly evolved into the on-campus home of aspiring hip-hop and electronic music DJs in the Ottawa area. The pub continues to host spoken-word poetry events and encourages open political discussion and debate. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Spoken word is a form of literary art or artistic performance in which lyrics, poetry, or stories are spoken rather than sung. ...


Rooster's Coffeehouse

Rooster's is a student-run café located on the fourth level of the University Centre. It claims to have the lowest food prices on campus, however this title is also claimed by Leonardo's Lounge. In addition to a variety of coffees and tea, it serves homemade baked goods and other light snacks. There is a comfortable seating area and a large, wide-screen television.


Leonardo's Lounge

Leonardo's Lounge (named after Leonardo Da Vinci and known to most simply as "Leo's") is the social and cultural hub of the Carleton Engineering community. Located in room 3342 of the Mackenzie Engineering building, Leo's is operated as a service of the Carleton Student Engineering Society. Leo's is operated exclusively by volunteers and is the cheapest place to get a coffee or snack on campus. Common sights at Leo's include heated games of euchre, Axis and Allies and Settlers of Catan, as well as napping students. “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Euchre (IPA: ) is a trick-taking card game most commonly played with four people in two partnerships with a deck of 24 standard playing cards. ... Axis and Allies redirects here. ... Settlers of Catan is a multiplayer board game designed by Klaus Teuber. ...


The Garden Spot

The Garden Spot is a not-for-profit pay-what-you-can volunteer vegan soup kitchen designed to serve affordable meals to the Carleton University community. Hens kept in cramped conditions — the avoidance of animal suffering is the primary motivation of people who become vegans A vegan is a person who avoids the ingestion or use of animal products. ...


The Garden Spot was based on an organization hailing from Concordia University with the name of the Peoples Potato. It has inspired one other student run organization at The University of Ottawa using the name of the People's Republic of Delicious or PRD. This article is about Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. ... For the university in Ottawa, Kansas, see Ottawa University. ...


Canadian Forces

Each summer, Canadian Forces use Carleton residence facilities — notably Russell and Grenville Houses and the Residence Commons cafeteria — to house and feed the Ceremonial Guard. The Guard performs daily parades on Parliament Hill, and mounts sentries at Rideau Hall. This agreement is beneficial both to the university and the military, allowing the military to use cost-effective facilities, while Carleton profits during the otherwise slower summer season. Image File history File links Ceremonial_Guard. ... The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The Ceremonial Guard is an ad hoc military unit in the Canadian Forces with elements drawn from two Primary Reserve (militia) regiments of Foot Guards: The Governor Generals Foot Guards from Ottawa and the Canadian Grenadier Guards from Montreal. ... For the hill in London, see Parliament Hill, London. ... Rideau Hall is the official residence of the Governor General of Canada, and is the place of residence of the Monarch of Canada when visiting Ottawa. ...


The Guard marches and drills at Carleton between June and August, and it is possible to watch formations carrying rifles in full ceremonial uniform marching to parking lots 6 and 7 to prepare for their daily parade.


Lineage and establishment

Kofi Annan, Secratry General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, receiving a Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, from Carleton University

. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to January 1, 2007, serving two five-year terms. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ...

Chancellors

Lester Pearson, Chancellor, Prime Minister, Nobel Laureate

Harry Stevenson Southam (1875-1954) was a Canadian publisher of The Ottawa Citizen and Chancellor of Carleton University from 1952 to 1954. ... Chalmers Jack Mackenzie (July 10, 1888 – February 26, 1984) was a Canadian civil engineer, chancellor of Carleton University, president of the National Research Council, first president of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and instrumental in the development of science and engineering education in Canada. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson, PC, CC, OM, MA (April 23, 1897 – December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ... Gerhard Herzberg (December 25, 1904 – March 3, 1999) was a pioneering theoretical chemist. ... The Honourable Robert Gordon Robertson, PC , CC , MA , DU , FRSC (born May 19, 1917) was Commissioner of the Northwest Territories from November 15, 1953 to July 12, 1963. ... Pauline Jewett, PC , OC , Ph. ... Arthur Kroeger (born 1932) is a retired Canadian civil servant and is referred to as the dean of deputy ministers. He received a B.A. in 1955 from the University of Alberta and was a Rhodes Scholar. ... Ramon John Ray Hnatyshyn PC,CC (March 16, 1934 - December 18, 2002) was Canadas twenty-fourth governor general, serving from 1990 to 1995. ... Captain (Navy) Joseph Jean-Pierre Marc Garneau CC, CD, Ph. ... Image File history File linksMetadata PearsonPDphotoportrait. ... Image File history File linksMetadata PearsonPDphotoportrait. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson (April 23, 1897 - December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ...

Presidents

Henry Marshall Tory (January 11, 1864 – February 6, 1947) was the first president of the University of Alberta (1908-1929), the first president of the National Research Council (1928-1935) and the first president of Carleton College (1942-1947). ... Murdoch Maxwell MacOdrum (b. ... James Alexander Gibson (b. ... Claude Thomas Bissell (February 10, 1916-2000) was a Canadian author and educator. ... Arnold Davidson Dunton (July 4, 1912 - February 7, 1987) was a Canadian educator and public administrator. ... Michael Kelway Oliver (b. ... James Downey (born April 20, 1939) is a Canadian academic. ... William Edwin Beckel is a Canadian academic and former president of Carleton University in Ottawa and the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. ... Richard Van Loon is a former Canadian civil servant and ex-president of Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario. ... David Atkinson is a Canadian academic and former president of two Ontario universities, Brock University in St. ... Samy A. Mahmoud is the acting president of Carleton University, appointed in November, 2006, after the sudden resignation of David W. Atkinson. ...

Notable alumni and faculty

. ... Nahlah Ayed is a foreign correspondent with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning Canadian/American comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... The Azrieli Towers in Tel Aviv, one of his premier projects in Israel. ... Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour, PC, OC, KCSG (born 25 August 1944, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a former financier, newspaper magnate, and biographer. ... Patrick Boyer (born March 4, 1945 in Bracebridge, Ontario) is a university professor and a former Progressive Conservative Member of Parliament (1984-1993). ... k-os (born Kevin Brereton on February 20, 1972 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian rapper, singer, songwriter and record producer of Trinidadian descent. ... Gord Brown (born August 31, 1960 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... The Honourable Madam Justice Louise Charron, B.A., LL.B., LL.D. The Honourable Justice Louise Charron, BA , LL.B , LL.D (born March 2, 1951 in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario) is a Canadian jurist. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... Rita Celli is a Canadian journalist and radio presenter. ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ... Michael (Mike) Colle (born February 1, 1945 in Foggia, Italy) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Alex Cullen is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Hans W. Daigeler (born February 21, 1945 in Bad Toelz, West Germany, died November 9, 1995) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Barry Devolin (born March 10, 1963) is a Canadian politician who is a member of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Paul W. Dewar (born January 25, 1963 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian NDP Member of Parliament, teacher and former elected representative of the Ottawa Carleton Elementary School Teachers Federation. ... Michelle Douglas (born December 30, 1963 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian human rights activist, who was involved in a landmark case around lesbian and gay equality rights in the Canadian military. ... Bruck Easton is a Windsor, Ontario lawyer and a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... On August 5, 2004 Prime Minister Paul Martin announced the appointment of Ward P.D. Elcock as Deputy Minister of National Defence. ... “CSIS” redirects here. ... Ivan Peter Fellegi, O.C., B.Sc. ... Matthew William Fraser (born July 3, 1958), Canadian journalist, academic, and author. ... The National Post is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ... Evelyn Adelaide Gigantes (born in 1942 in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Edward Greenspon is the editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail newspaper, based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Globe and Mail is a Canadian English-language nationally distributed newspaper, based in Toronto and printed in six cities across the country. ... Dr Peter Grünberg is a German physicist and one of the discoverers of the Giant magnetoresistive effect which brought about a breakthrough in gigabyte hard disks. ... Gregory Henriquez is an architect best known for the design of several community-based mixed-use and social housing projects in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Peter Charles Archibald Ewart Jennings, CM (July 29, 1938 – August 7, 2005) was a Canadian-American journalist and news anchor. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting. ... Pauline Jewett, PC , OC , Ph. ... W. Leo Jordan (born in Almonte, Ontario) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Jim Judd is the current Director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. ... “CSIS” redirects here. ... Wilbert Joseph Keon The Honourable Wilbert Joseph Keon, BSc, MD (born May 17, 1935) is a heart surgeon, researcher and Canadian Senator. ... Warren Kinsella in his basement Warren Kinsella should not be confused with Canadian author W. P. Kinsella. ... Chalmers Jack Mackenzie (July 10, 1888 – February 26, 1984) was a Canadian civil engineer, chancellor of Carleton University, president of the National Research Council, first president of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and instrumental in the development of science and engineering education in Canada. ... Atomic Energy of Canada Limited or AECL is a Canadian federal Crown corporation with the responsibility of managing Canadas national nuclear energy research and development program, including the advancement and support of CANDU reactor technology which was developed at AECL starting in the 1950s. ... Robert Breckenridge Ware MacNeil, sometimes called by his nickname Robin, (born January 19, 1931) is a television news anchor and journalist who paired with Jim Lehrer to create The MacNeil/Lehrer Report in 1975. ... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country (Hebrews 11. ... Former Canadian MP John Manley John Paul Manley, PC, BA, LL.B is a Canadian lawyer, businessperson and politician, was born on January 5, 1950 in Ottawa. ... The Deputy Prime Minister of Canada (French: Vice-premier ministre du Canada) is an honorary position in the Canadian government, conferred at the discretion of the Prime Minister on a member of the cabinet. ... The Minister of Finance is one of the most important positions in the Cabinet of Canada. ... Propaganda and the Ethics of Persuasion Randal Marlin is a philosophy professor at Carleton University who specializes in the study of propaganda. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is one of three major political parties in Ontario, Canada running in the 2007 Ontario provincial election. ... Thomas Nevakshonoff (born December 22, 1958 in Winnipeg) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Paul Okalik Hon. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... Gordon Kendrew Pape (born 1936) is an American-Canadian author and newsletter publisher. ... Ernie Parsons (born June 5, 1946 in Belleville, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson, PC, CC, OM, MA (April 23, 1897 – December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Michael Prue standing on the lawn of the Ontario Legislature Michael Prue (born July 14, 1948 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian politician, who represents the riding of Beaches—East York in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. ... Karim Rashid (born 1960) is a contemporary thinker and industrial designer. ... Scott Reid may refer to: Scott Jeffrey Reid (born 1964), Conservative Party of Canada MP Scott Reid (political advisor), advisor to former Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin Scott Reid (athlete), a professional hockey goalie from the Central Hockey League Scott Reid (baseball) (born 1947), baseball player Category: ... Norman W. Sterling (born February 19, 1942 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Barbara Sullivan (born January 24, 1943 in Calgary, Alberta) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Judy Wasylycia-Leis (born August 10, 1951) is a Canadian politician. ... Jim Watson is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Keenan Wellar (born July 24, 1968, in Evanston, Illinois) is the originator and co-founder of the LiveWorkPlay self-advocacy organization (established in 1995) for people with intellectual disabilities based in Ottawa, Canada. ... LiveWorkPlay (LWP) is a Canadian charitable organization for people with intellectual disabilities. ... Heartwood House is a charitable organization in Ottawa, Canada. ... Susan Joan Wood (August 22, 1948[1]-November 12, 1980[2] was a Canadian author, critic, and science fiction fan, born in Ottawa, Ontario. ... Peter Worthington (born February 16, 1927) is a Canadian journalist. ... The Toronto Sun is an English language daily newspaper published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...

Notable honorary degree recipients

  • Dag Hammarskjöld, United Nations Secretary-General (1953-1961), Nobel Peace Prize laureate, awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1954
  • U Thant, United Nations Secretary-General (1961-1971), awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1962
  • Kurt Waldheim, United Nations Secretary-General (1972-1981), awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1972
  • Tommy Douglas, 7th Premier of Saskatchewan, led the first socialist government in North America and introduced universal public health care to Canada, awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1980
  • Javier Pérez de Cuéllar, United Nations Secretary-General (1982-1992), awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1985
  • Mikhail Gorbachev, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1993
  • Boutros Boutros-Ghali, United Nations Secretary-General (1992-1997), awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 1995
  • Romano Prodi, 79th Prime Minister of Italy, awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 2001
  • Kofi Annan, United Nations Secretary-General (1997-2007), Nobel Peace Prize laureate, awarded a Legum Doctor, honoris causa in 2004

Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... U Thant (Burmese: ; 22 January 1909 – 25 November 1974) was a Burmese diplomat and the third Secretary-General of the United Nations, from 1961 to 1971. ... Kurt Josef Waldheim (21 December 1918 – 14 June 2007) was an Austrian diplomat and politician. ... Thomas Clement Douglas, PC, CC, SOM, MA, LL.D (hc) (October 20, 1904 – February 24, 1986) was a Scottish-born Baptist minister who became a prominent Canadian social democratic politician. ... Javier Pérez de Cuéllar de la Guerra (born January 19, 1920 in Lima) is a Peruvian diplomat who served as the fifth Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1991. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... Joseph Stalin, first General Secretary The General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (First Secretary in 1953-1966) was the title synonymous with leader of the Soviet Union after Vladimir Lenins death in 1924. ... Boutros Boutros-Ghali (Arabic: بطرس بطرس غالي Coptic: BOYTPOC BOYTPOC ΓΑΛΗ) (born November 14, 1922) is an Egyptian diplomat who was the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1992 to December 1996. ... Prodi redirects here. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to January 1, 2007, serving two five-year terms. ...

Notes

  1. ^ [1] Carleton University Fact Sheet [Accessed 24 May 2007]
  2. ^ ibid
  3. ^ [2] (P. 12) Carleton University Financial Statement [Accessed 24 May 2007]
  4. ^ http://www.carleton.ca/duc/newsroom/newsreleases/Nov_20_B.htm
  5. ^ http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/document/reports/futuree.html#appendixB
  6. ^ http://www.now.carleton.ca/2005-11b/994.htm
  7. ^ http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=9c678c0a-c3c4-4367-986d-a400f84d667e
  8. ^ http://www.carleton.ca/duc/newsroom/newsreleases/Sept_15b.html
  9. ^ http://www.admissions.carleton.ca/programs/ugprogram.htm?dd=12
  10. ^ http://ed.sjtu.edu.cn/rank/2006/ARWU2006_301-400.htm
  11. ^ http://www.carleton.ca/duc/newsroom/newsreleases/Sept_15b.html
  12. ^ http://www.uoguelph.ca/~tstengos/eearank93.pdf
  13. ^ http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=9c678c0a-c3c4-4367-986d-a400f84d667e
  14. ^ [3] History of Carleton 1979-1990: Coming to terms with a different world
  15. ^ http://oirp.carleton.ca/pi-2006/tables/hs-grades-update_hpr.htm>
  16. ^ Symons, Courney. "Admin to rethink scholarship policy", The Charlatan, 5 Oct 2006. 
  17. ^ http://www.carleton.ca/socknbuskin/
  18. ^ Parkes, Sara. "BACKGROUND: Unicentre renovation dispute", The Charlatan, 25 Aug 2005. 

See also

The Carleton Ravens are the athletic teams that represent Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... The Carleton University Students Association (or CUSA) is a non-profit corporation that represents the undergraduate students at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. ... // Summary The Charlatan is the name of the student campus newspaper (ISSN 0315-1859) published at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario by a non-profit corporation, Charlatan Publications Inc. ... . ... CKCU is a Canadian campus radio station, broadcasting at 93. ... The view looking south from Carleton. ...

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