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Encyclopedia > Carleton College
Carleton College

Motto: Declaratio Sermonum Tuorum Illuminat (Latin)
(The revelation of your words illuminates)
Established: November 14, 1866
Type: Private liberal arts college
Endowment: US $650 million
President: Robert A. Oden, Ph.D.
Faculty: 198
Undergraduates: 1,958
Postgraduates: 0
Location: Northfield, Minnesota, USA
Campus: Rural, 1040 acres
Colors: Maize and Blue
Nickname: "Carls" or "Knights"
Mascot: Carleton Knight
Affiliations: MIAC
Website: www.carleton.edu

Coordinates: 44°27′43″N 93°9′13.6″W / 44.46194, -93.153778 Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. In 1871, its name changed to Carleton College in honor of benefactor William Carleton of Charlestown, Massachusetts, who donated US$50,000 to the fledgling institution. According to current U.S. News and World Report rankings, Carleton College is the #5 liberal arts college in the United States.[1] The College currently enrolls 1,958 undergraduate students, and employs 198 full-time faculty members. Robert A. Oden is the current President. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Robert A. Oden Jr. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Sectarianism refers (usually pejoratively) to a rigid adherence to a particular sect or party or religious denomination. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... William Carleton (1797 – 1876) was a prosperous manufacturer of brassware from Charlestown, Massachusetts. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Robert A. Oden Jr. ...

Contents

Defining features

Academically, Carleton is nationally recognized as a leading undergraduate institution. It is consistently ranked in the U.S. News and World Report's college rankings within the top ten U.S. liberal arts schools (tied for fifth place with Middlebury College in 2007-08). The most recent middle 50 percent of admitted students received 1330-1490 on the SAT Critical Reading and Math Sections, with over three quarters ranked in the top 10% of their high school graduating classes. Carleton consistently enrolls more students in the National Merit Scholarship Program than any other liberal arts college in the country [1] and its Class of 2011 includes seventy-nine National Merit Scholars (which includes both Carleton sponsored and external National Merit Scholars) of its 512 students. The College is a leading source of PhD recipients,[2] [3]and is also recognized for sending an unusually large number of female students to graduate programs in the sciences.[4] Alumni giving, a measure of alumni satisfaction with the College, was 64% in 2006, the highest among liberal arts colleges. Carleton leads all baccalaureate colleges in the number of its students awarded prestigious National Science Foundation Fellowships for graduate study from 1990-99. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The National Merit Scholarship Program is an academic scholarship competition for recognition and college scholarships administered by National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), a privately funded, not-for-profit organization. ...


Extracurriculars at Carleton are an integral part of student life. Although the Carleton student body consists of fewer than two thousand undergraduates, the school's nearly 150 active student organizations include three theatre boards (coordinating as many as ten productions every term), longform and shortform improv groups and a sketch comedy troupe, seven a cappella groups, four choirs, at least seven specialized instrumental ensembles, five dance interest groups, two auditioned dance companies, a successful Mock Trial team, a nationally-competitive debate program, seven recurring student publications and a student-run KRLX radio station employing more than 200 volunteers each term. This article is about the vocal technique. ... // The Station KRLX is an entirely student-run, format-free, non-commercial FM radio station broadcasting from Northfield, Minnesota. ...


Carleton also participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN). Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...


Carleton is committed to environmentally conscious initiatives, and in October 2007, the Sustainable Endowments Institute, a Cambridge, Massachusetts, organization involved in research on the sustainability of higher education endowments, recognized Carleton as a leader in overall college sustainability for its environmentally sound practices and endowment transparency. In the College Sustainability Report Card 2008, which evaluates the 200 colleges and universities with the largest endowments in the United States and Canada, Carleton received the highest evaluation grade of A-, putting the College in the category of College Sustainability Leader with Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Middlebury College, University of Vermont and University of Washington. The Report Card also cited Carleton as an Endowment Sustainability Leader, along with Dartmouth College and Williams College [5]. Carleton also receives approximately 40% of its energy from a wind turbine located near the college. This article is about the city in England. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... UVM redirects here. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Williams College is a highly selective [1] private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ...


Athletics

Carleton has numerous athletic opportunities for students, including 19 varsity teams, 23 club teams, and dozens of intramural teams (including 40 separate broomball teams,) forming every term. Carleton competes in NCAA Division III, meaning it offers no athletic scholarships. Its men's and women's cross country teams are generally strong, with numerous all-Americans and one national championship (men's, 1980). Additionally, the Women's Swimming and Diving program is a perennial Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) conference power. The football team won the conference championship in 1992 with a 9-1 record and received one of 16 bids to the Division III National Championship Tournament. In 2006, the men's basketball team tied the University of St. Thomas for the conference championship and received an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament. In 2007, the women's golf program sent its first individual qualifier to the Division III Women's Golf NCAA Tournament. In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ... A game of broomball begins with a face-off Broomball is a popular recreational ice sport originating in Canada and played around the world. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... An athletic scholarship is a form of scholarship to attend a college or university awarded to an individual based predominantly on their ability to play in a sport. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ...


Club sports at Carleton are very active; turnout for teams like men's and women's rugby will often exceed 40 players per team. Of the club teams, the student-run Ultimate clubs have had the most competitive success; most notably, the Carleton (Men's) Ultimate Team (CUT) and women's team Syzygy have been national contenders every year. CUT qualified annually for nationals from 1990 to 2005 and won the National Championship in 2001. Syzygy qualified for nationals fifteen of sixteen years (1989-2002, 2004-2005), winning the National Championship in 2000 and taking second place in 1998, 1999 and 2004. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ...


Campus

Gould Library

The college campus was created in 1867 with the gift of two ten-acre parcels, one from Charles Goodsell and the other from Charles Augustus Wheaton. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 712 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 712 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Charles Augustus Wheaton (??-1882) was a major figure in the central New York state abolitionist movement and Underground Railroad. ...


The Cowling Arboretum, created from lands purchased in the 1920s during difficult financial times by then president Donald J. Cowling, was first called "Cowling's Folly" and, later, his legacy. It consists of approximately 880 acres (3.6 km²) of forest, field, and floodplain, and it includes many miles of trails. The conceptual framework of the arboretum was based on the works of Christopher Williams (artist), a notable Grinnell College alumnus. Cowling Arboretum 880 acres (3. ... Christopher Williams (born 1956) is an American conceptual artist and photographer. ... Grinnell students celebrate the end of the semester outside Gates Residence Hall in May 2006. ...


Carleton built a new 80,000 square-foot Recreation Center in 2000, with a full indoor fieldhouse located above a state-of-the-art fitness center complete with a climbing wall and bouldering wall. Climbing a rock-textured wall with belay, modular hand holds, incuts, and protrusions A climbing wall is an artificially constructed wall with grips for hands and feet, used for climbing. ...


Historic sites

Skinner Memorial Chapel.

Several of Carleton's properties have been recognized for their historic value. The National Register of Historic Places lists Willis Hall (1868), Goodsell Observatory (1887), Scoville Memorial Library (1896), and Skinner Memorial Chapel (1916). Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1431 KB)Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Northfield, Minnesota File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1431 KB)Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Northfield, Minnesota File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel is a chapel and historic building on the campus of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This article is about the historic building in Northfield, Minnesota. ... Goodsell Observatory is a building on the campus of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. ... This article is about the historic library in Northfield, Minnesota. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel is a chapel and historic building on the campus of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. ...


Traditions

Carleton's history has given rise to several notable traditions. Many of these are pranks, such as painting the college's water tower. Most notably, a remarkably accurate likeness of President Clinton was painted the night before his commencement speech in 2000, and painted over by college maintenance very early the following morning. Administrative attitudes toward this particular phenomenon have changed over time. For liability-related reasons, even climbing the water tower is now considered a grave infraction. Streaking also remains a ubiquitous phenomenon, even and most impressively in winter temperatures that average about 15°F (-9°C), and occasionally reach lows around -25º (-32°C). William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For other uses, see Streaking (microbiology) and Streak. ...

President Emeritus Laurence Gould is briefly reunited with the bust of Schiller in this undated archive photo from The Carletonian

More perplexingly, a bust of Friedrich Schiller, known simply as "Schiller", appears frequently, though briefly, at large campus events. The tradition dates back to 1957, when a student appropriated the bust from an unlocked storage area in the new Gould Library, only to have the bust stolen from him in turn, an exchange which soon escalated into a high-profile conflict that eventually took on by necessity a high degree of secrecy and strategy. These days, Schiller's appearance, accompanied by the shout "Schiller!", is a tacit challenge to other students to pursue in an attempt to capture the bust (which has, understandably, been replaced at least once; the currently circulating bust of Schiller was retrieved from Puebla, Mexico in the summer of 2003). In 2006, students created an online scavenger hunt, made up of a series of complex riddles about Carleton [2], ultimately leading participants to Schiller's hidden location. The bust was subsequently stolen from the winner of the scavenger hunt. At Commencement in 2006 the holders of the bust arranged for Schiller to "graduate." His name was called at the appropriate moment during the awarding of diplomas, the bust was pulled from the podium and prominently displayed. ImageMetadata File history File links Gould_schiller. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Gould_schiller. ... Friedrich Schiller “Schiller” redirects here. ... The Mexican state of Puebla is located in the center of the country, to the east of Mexico City. ...


Finally, a softball game known as Rotblatt, in honor (or open mockery) of player Marvin Rotblatt, is held every spring. The day-long celebration features free t-shirts and a good deal of requisite drinking, and the number of innings played coincides with the College's current anniversary. In 1997, Sports Illustrated honored Rotblatt in its "Best of Everything" section with the award, "Longest Intramural Event." Marvin Rotblatt (born October 18, 1927 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed Rotty, is a former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox in the 1948, 1950 and 1951 seasons. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


Alma Mater

O, Carleton, our Alma Mater,
We hail the Maize and Blue;
Thy name is ever dearest
Thy children ever true.
O, Carleton, our Alma Mater,
To thee we sing our praise;
For thee we fight,
To thee we pledge
The strength of all our days!

This article is about the maize plant. ... This article is about the colour. ...

Trivia

  • The nation's oldest student-run pub, The Cave, was founded at Carleton in 1927 in the basement of Evans Hall, and continues to host live music shows and other events several times each week.
  • The College's format-free student-run radio station, KRLX, founded in 1947 as KARL, was recently ranked by the Princeton Review as one of the nation's ten best college radio stations. KRLX broadcasts continually when school is in session.
  • The popular early computer game The Oregon Trail was first created, and later developed, by students at Carleton in 1971.
  • The Chicago Reader, one of the first alternative weeklies, was founded in 1971 by a small group of recent Carleton graduates. They later started the Los Angeles Reader (no longer published) and the Washington City Paper. In July 2007, the founders sold the Reader to Creative Loafing.
  • The Reformed Druids of North America was founded at Carleton in 1963, initially as an effort to be excused from attending the then-required weekly chapel service, and later as legitimate spiritual exploration.
  • Peter Tork of The Monkees was a student of English at Carleton for three years until he dropped out to pursue music full-time.
  • Popular PBS and National Geographic TV zoology host Chris Kratt received his BA in biology from Carleton.
  • Carleton hosted the first and only NCAA-sponsored metric football game in 1977. The game was dubbed the "Liter Bowl" and was measured in meters instead of yards. Carleton lost the game to St. Olaf by a score of 42-0.
  • The world premiere production of Bertolt Brecht's play The Caucasian Chalk Circle was performed in 1948 at Carleton's Nourse Little Theater.
  • The popular indie band Tapes 'N Tapes formed at Carleton in the winter of 2003.
  • The school's all-male a cappella group, The Carleton Singing Knights, performed a version of Daft Punk's Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger. The video([3] on Youtube has received over a million views.
  • A scene from the movie D3: The Mighty Ducks was filmed in Carleton's Great Hall.
  • In 5 of the last 12 years, Carleton College students received the Best Delegation award at the World Model United Nations competition.

The Cave is the oldest student-run pub in the United States and is a favorite gathering place for students at Carleton College and is one of a limited number of music venues in Northfield, Minnesota. ... Evans Hall is a common name for buildings on College and University Campuses. ... // The Station KRLX is an entirely student-run, format-free, non-commercial FM radio station broadcasting from Northfield, Minnesota. ... The Oregon Trail is an educational computer game developed by Don Rawitsch, Bill Heinemann and Paul Dillenberger in 1971 and produced by MECC in 1974. ... The Chicago Reader is an alternative newsweekly in Chicago, Illinois. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... Los Angeles Reader was a weekly paper established in 1978 and distributed in Los Angeles, USA. It followed the format of the (still active) Chicago Reader. ... The Washington City Paper is a U.S. alternative weekly newspaper serving the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. ... A group of British druids, congregating to celebrate the summer solstice at stonehenge. ... Peter Halsten Thorkelson (born February 13, 1942), better known as Peter Tork, is an American musician and actor. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... One half of two incredibly good-looking and multi-talented brothers who love animals and want to spread knowledge of the animal kingdom to their viewers. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... St Olaf can refer to: St. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... The Caucasian Chalk Circle is one of Bertolt Brechts most important plays and one of the most regularly performed German plays. ... Tapes n Tapes is an indie rock band from Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger is a song by French duo Daft Punk released as a single on October 13, 2001. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ...

Notable alumni

See also Category:Carleton College alumni

Thorstein Bunde Veblen (born Tosten Bunde Veblen July 30, 1857 – August 3, 1929) was a Norwegian-American sociologist and economist and a founder, along with John R. Commons, of the Institutional economics movement. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The Theory of the Leisure Class is a book, first published in 1899, by the American economist Thorstein Veblen while he was a professor at the University of Chicago. ... Pierce Butler (March 17, 1866 – November 16, 1939) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1923 until his death in 1939. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Ernest Lundeen (August 4, 1878–August 31, 1940) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Karl Earl Mundt (June 3, 1900 - August 16, 1974) was an American educator and a Republican member of the United States Congress, representing South Dakota in the United States House of Representatives from 1938 to 1948 and in the United States Senate from 1948 to 1973. ... Robert K. Greenleaf (1904-1990) was the founder of the modern Servant leadership movement. ... Waren Perley Knowles (August 19, 1908–May 1, 1993) was an American lawyer from New Richmond, Wisconsin. ... Sheldon Baird Vance (January 18, 1917 – November 12, 1995), born in Crookston, Minnesota, was the U.S. ambassador to Zaire from May 27, 1969 through March 26, 1974. ... Melvin Laird Melvin Robert (Bam) Laird was born September 1, 1922 and nicknamed Bambino (shortened to Bam and pronounced like the word bomb) by his mother. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Anthony Downs is a noted scholar in public policy, and since 1977 is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington D.C.. Downs has served as a consultant to many of the nations largest corporations, including the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the White House. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Michael H. Armacost is a fellow at Stanford Universitys Institute for International Studies. ... The Brookings Institution is a United States nonprofit public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.. Described in 1977, by TIME magazine as as the nations pre-eminent liberal think tank,[1] the institution is devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly... Michael Gartner (born October 25, 1938, in Des Moines, Iowa) is an American journalist and businessman. ... Jack Barnes (born in 1940) is an American Communist and the National Secretary of the Socialist Workers Party. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ... Garrick Utley (November 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) is an American TV journalist. ... Parker J. Palmer (born 1939) is an author, educator, and activist. ... Walter Alvarez (born 1940), son of Nobel Prize winning physicist Luis Alvarez, is a professor in the Earth and Planetary Science department at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Donella Dana Meadows (March 13, 1941 Elgin, Illinois, USA - February 20, 2001, New Hampshire) was a pioneering environmental scientist, a teacher and writer. ... Limits to Growth was a 1972 book modeling the consequences of a rapidly growing world population and finite resource supplies, commissioned by the Club of Rome. ... Thomas Mengler, an expert in procedure and complex litigation, is dean of the law school at the University of St. ... The University of Saint Thomas (also known as UST or simply St. ... The University of Illinois College of Law, or UIUC College of Law is a law school school located in Champaign, Illinois. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your History Textbook Got Wrong, by James W. Loewen, is a critical review of the gulf between the best evidence available to historians and the evidence presented to American high school students in the 12 most popular history textbooks. ... Barrie M. Osborne is a movie producer, executive producer, production manager and director. ... This article is about the Peter Jackson film trilogy. ... Mary-Claire King (1946- ) is an American human geneticist. ... Rush Dew Holt, Jr. ... Kai Bird is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning author and columnist, best known for his biographies of political figures. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Kirbyjon H. Caldwell is the pastor of the Windsor Village United Methodist Church, a 14,000-member megachurch in Houston, Texas. ... Pamela Dean (Pamela Dean Dyer-Bennet) is a fantasy author whose most notable book is Tam Lin, based on the Child Ballad of the same name, in which the Scottish fairy story is set on a midwestern college campus loosely based on Carleton College in Minnesota. ... Jane Hamilton (born 13 July 1957) is an American novelist. ... John F. Harris is a writer for the Washington Post and the author of a book on Bill Clinton called The Survivor (ISBN 0375508473). ... The Politico is a Washington, D.C.-based political journalism organization that distributes its content via television, the internet, newspaper, and radio. ... Paul J. Morrison is a United States politican and lawyer and is the Attorney General of Kansas. ... Clara Jeffery (born August 25, 1967, in Baltimore, Maryland) is the co-editor of Mother Jones magazine [1]. (Monika Bauerlein is the other co-Editor. ... Mother Jones Magazine is a leftist magazine named after labor organizer Mary Harris Jones (May 1, 1830 - November 30, 1930), better known as Mother Jones. ... One half of two incredibly good-looking and multi-talented brothers who love animals and want to spread knowledge of the animal kingdom to their viewers. ... Masanori Mark Christianson (born Masanori Shirota, January 18, 1976 in ÅŒmori, Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese American musician, art director, copywriter, visual artist and model. ...

Notable faculty

  • Ian Barbour, professor emeritus, 1989–91 Gifford lecturer on religion and science, and winner of the 1999 Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.
  • David Bryn-Jones, biographer of U.S. Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg, taught history, economics, and international relations at Carleton from 1920 to 1951.
  • John Bates Clark, a famous American economist, was a professor at Carleton, and taught Thorstein Veblen.
  • Frank Daniel, Czech Born writer, producer, director, and teacher; developer of the sequence paradigm of screenwriting.
  • Burton Levin, Former United States Consul General to Hong Kong and US Ambassador to Burma from May 1987 to September 1990, is currently the SIT Investment Visiting Professor of Asian Policy.
  • Laurence McKinley Gould, who was second-in-command to Richard E. Byrd on his first landmark expedition to Antarctica, served as a professor of geology at Carleton and later as College President from 1945-1962.
  • Roy Grow, Kellogg Professor of International Relations and the director of the International Relations, is a former military interpreter and analyst in Asia. He is often heard on programs such as Minnesota Public Radio's Midday.
  • Paul Wellstone, a U.S. Senator from Minnesota from 1991 until his death in 2002, was a professor of political science at Carleton from 1969 to 1990.
  • Reed Whittemore, acclaimed American poet who taught English at Carleton.

Ian Graeme Barbour He was born in Beijing, 1923. ... The Gifford Lectures were established by the will of Adam Lord Gifford (d. ... The Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities was until 2001 awarded for Progress in Religion. ... David Bryn-Jones (1883-) was an historian, educator, Baptist minister, and biographer of U.S. Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg, who won the Nobel Peace Prize as one of the authors of the Kellogg-Briand Pact. ... John Bates Clark John Bates Clark (26 January 1847 – 21 March 1938) was an American neo-classical economist. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Thorstein Bunde Veblen (born Tosten Bunde Veblen July 30, 1857 – August 3, 1929) was a Norwegian-American sociologist and economist and a founder, along with John R. Commons, of the Institutional economics movement. ... Frank (Frantisek) Daniel was born on 14 April 1926 in Kolin, Czech Republic. ... In film parlance, a sequence is a series of scenes which comprise a distinct narrative unit, usually connected either by unity of location or unity of time. ... Burton Levin is the SIT Investment Visiting Professor of Asian Policy at Carleton College. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... Laurence McKinley Gould (August 22, 1896 - June 21, 1995) was a American polar explorer. ... Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was a pioneering American polar explorer and famous aviator. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Edward Reed Whittemore II (September 11, 1919–) is an American poet and college professor. ...

Points of interest

Cowling Arboretum 880 acres (3. ... Goodsell Observatory is a building on the campus of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. ... // The Station KRLX is an entirely student-run, format-free, non-commercial FM radio station broadcasting from Northfield, Minnesota. ... The Cave is the oldest student-run pub in the United States and is a favorite gathering place for students at Carleton College and is one of a limited number of music venues in Northfield, Minnesota. ...

References

  1. ^ Liberal Arts Colleges: Top Schools, US News & World Reports, Accessed June 10, 2008.
  2. ^ Gravois, John (January 7, 2005). "Number of Doctorates Edges Up Slightly". The Chronicle of Higher Education 51 (18): A24. 
  3. ^ Baccalaureate Origins Peer Analysis, Centre College, accessed February 23, 2008
  4. ^ Wilson, Robin (May 5, 2006). "A Hothouse for Female Scientists". The Chronicle of Higher Education 52 (35): A13. 
  5. ^ College Sustainability Report Card 2008, Sustainable Endowments Institute, accessed February 23, 2008

is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Carleton College - Arts Colleges - Top US Colleges (504 words)
Carleton College is an independent liberal arts college; ranked fifth upon the top liberal arts colleges in the United States by the US news and world report.
The Carleton College campus stretches over 1040 acres, which includes an 880-acre arboretum, which is a variety of plants and shrubs grown for their ecological study.
In addition the college boasts with a science complex that comprises a Center for Mathematics and Computing, which was completed in 1993, a biology building; completed in 1995, and buildings for physics and psychology; which were refurbished in 1996 and chemistry and geology buildings, remodeled in 1997.
Carleton College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1466 words)
Carleton's Goodsell Observatory, built in 1887, is on the national registry of historic places.
The Carleton College Cowling Arboretum, created from lands purchased in the 1920s during difficult financial times by then president Donald J. Cowling, was first called "Cowling's Folly" and, later, his legacy.
The mother grove of the RDNA or Reformed Druids of North America was founded at Carleton in 1963, initially as an effort to be excused from attending the then-required daily chapel service, and later as legitimate spiritual exploration.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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