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Encyclopedia > Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst, Freiherr von Weber (November 18, 1786 in Eutin, Holstein – June 5, 1826 in London, England) was a German composer, conductor, pianist and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romantic school. Image File history File links Carl Maria von Weber Project Gutenberg text 10957 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Carl Maria von Weber Project Gutenberg text 10957 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Freiherr (German for Free Lord) is a title of lower nobility in Germany, the Baltic states and Austria-Hungary, considered equal to the title Baron. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map of Germany showing Eutin Eutin is the district capital of Ostholstein located in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... The word critic comes from the Greek κριτικός, kritikós - one who discerns, which itself arises from the Ancient Greek word κριτής, krités, meaning a person who offers reasoned judgement or analysis, value judgement, interpretation, or observation. ... Romanticism is an artistic, romantic and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe. ...


Weber's works, especially his operas Der Freischütz, Euryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. He was also an innovative composer of instrumental music. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet and a duo concertante, are regularly performed, while his piano music - including four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor - influenced composers such as Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt and Felix Mendelssohn. The Konzertstück provided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt's, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Igor Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for piano and orchestra. Der Freischütz (English: The Freeshooter) is an opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a libretto by Friedrich Kind. ... Euryanthe is a German Romantic opera by Carl Maria von Weber, first performed at the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna on 25 October 1823. ... Oberon, or The Elf Kings Oath is a romantic opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a English libretto by James Robinson Planche, after a poem by Christoph Martin Wieland. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... A concertino (or Konzertstück) is a short concerto. ... The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin (commonly mistaken for a daguerreotype), believed to have been taken by Louis-Auguste Bisson in 1849 “Chopin” redirects here. ... Franz Liszt (Hungarian: Liszt Ferenc; the surname is pronounced as the English word list, that is ) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian virtuoso pianist and composer of the Romantic period. ... Felix Mendelssohn at the age of 30 Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and known generally as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) was a German composer and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ...


Weber's contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song-cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten.


Weber's orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers - Hector Berlioz referred to him several times in his Treatise on Orchestration while Claude Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument. Hector Louis Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem) of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... Achille-Claude Debussy (IPA ) (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918) was a French composer. ...


His operas influenced the work of later composers such as Heinrich Marschner, Giacomo Meyerbeer and Richard Wagner, and homage has been paid him by 20th century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky, Gustav Mahler (who completed Weber's unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Paul Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphoses of Themes of Weber). Heinrich Marschner (b. ... Giacomo Meyerbeer Giacomo Meyerbeer (September 5, 1791 – May 2, 1864) was a noted German-born opera composer, and the first great exponent of Grand Opera. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Die drei Pintos (The Three Pintos) is a comic opera by Carl Maria von Weber with a libretto by Theodore Hell. ... Paul Hindemith (16 November 1895 – 28 December 1963) was a German composer, violist, violinist, teacher, music theorist and conductor. ...


Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works. Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Lithography stone and mirror-image print of a map of Munich. ...

Contents

Early life

Weber was the eldest of the three children of Franz Anton von Weber (who seems to have had no real claim to a "von" denoting nobility), and his second wife, Genovefa Brenner, an actress. Franz Anton started his career as a military officer in the service of the Duchy of Holstein; later he held a number of musical directorships; and in 1787 he went on to Hamburg, where he founded a theatrical company. Weber's cousin Constanze was the wife of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... Hamburg from above Hamburgs motto: May the posterity endeavour with dignity to conserve the freedom, which the forefathers acquired. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ...


Weber's father gave him a comprehensive education, which was however interrupted by the family's constant moves.


In 1796, Weber continued his musical education in Hildburghausen, where he was instructed by the oboist Johann Peter Heuschkel. Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Hildburghausen is a town in Thuringia, capital of the district Hildburghausen. ... Johann Peter Heuschkel (January 4, 1773 - December 5, 1853), was a German composer. ...


On March 13, 1798, Weber's mother died of tuberculosis. That same year, Weber went to Salzburg, to study with Michael Haydn; and later to Munich, to study with the singer Johann Evangelist Wallishauser, (known as Valesi), and with the organist J.N. Kalcher. March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Salzburg is a city in western Austria and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg (population 150,000 in 2006). ... Michael Haydn Johann Michael Haydn (September 14, 1737 – August 10, 1806) was an Austrian composer, the younger brother of (Franz) Joseph Haydn. ... Munich (German: , pronounced  ) is the capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria (German: ). Munich is Germanys third largest city and one of Europes most prosperous. ...


1798 also saw Weber's first published work, six fughettas for piano, published in Leipzig. Other compositions of that period, amongst them a mass, and his first opera, Die Macht der Liebe und des Weins (The Power of Love and Wine), are lost; but a set of Variations for the Pianoforte was later lithographed by Weber himself, under the guidance of Alois Senefelder, the inventor of the process. For the use of the word in psychology see fugue state In music, a fugue is a type of piece written in counterpoint for several independent musical voices. ... [] (Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the Federal State (Bundesland) of Saxony in Germany. ... The Mass, a form of sacred musical composition, is a choral composition that sets the fixed portions of the Eucharistic liturgy (principally that of the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Church, generally known in the US as the Episcopal Church, and also the Lutheran Church) to music. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Alois Senefelder (November 6, 1771 _ February 26, 1834) was a German inventor. ...

Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber

In 1800, the family moved to Freiberg, in Saxony, where Weber, then 14 years old, wrote an opera called Das stumme Waldmädchen (The silent forest maiden), which was produced at the Freiberg theatre. It was later performed in Vienna, Prague, and St. Petersburg. Carl Maria von Weber This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Freiberg is the name of two cities in Germany (note there is also a Freiburg) Freiberg, Saxony Freiberg (Neckar) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ... Vienna (German: , see also other names) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Nickname: City of a Hundred Spires Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area    - City 496 km²  (191. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and...


Weber also began to write articles as a critic, e.g. in the Leipziger Neue Zeitung (1801). The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


In 1801, the family returned to Salzburg, where Weber resumed his studies with Michael Haydn. He later continued studying in Vienna with Abbé Vogler (Georg Joseph Vogler), founder of three important music schools (in Mannheim, Stockholm, and Darmstadt; another famous pupil of Vogler was Giacomo Meyerbeer, who became a close friend of Weber. Michael Haydn Johann Michael Haydn (September 14, 1737 – August 10, 1806) was an Austrian composer, the younger brother of (Franz) Joseph Haydn. ... Georg Joseph Vogler, also known as Abbé Vogler (June 15, 1749 – May 6, 1814), German composer, organist, teacher and theorist, was born at Pleichach in Würzburg. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ...   (IPA: ; UN/LOCODE: SE STO) is the capital of Sweden, and consequently the site of its Government and Parliament as well as the residence of the Swedish head of state, King Carl XVI Gustaf. ... Darmstadt is a city in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hessen in Germany. ... Giacomo Meyerbeer Giacomo Meyerbeer (September 5, 1791 – May 2, 1864) was a noted German-born opera composer, and the first great exponent of Grand Opera. ...


In 1803, Weber's opera, Peter Schmoll und seine Nachbarn (Peter Schmoll and his Neighbors) was produced in Augsburg, and gave Weber his first success as a popular composer. Augsburg is a city in south-central Germany. ...


Success

Vogler, impressed by his pupil's obvious talent, recommended him to the post of Director at the Opera in Breslau (1806), and from 1807 to 1810, Weber held a post at the court of the Duke of Württemberg, in Stuttgart. Wrocław. ... King Frederick I of Württemberg Crown of the Kingdom of Württemberg Frederick I (German: ) (November 6, 1754 — October 30, 1816) was the first King of Württemberg. ... City Center seen from Weinsteige Road Stuttgart Palace Square - New Palace Solitude Palace The 1956 TV Tower U.S. Army Kelley Barracks Stuttgart [], located in southern Germany, is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg with a population of 591,528 (as of April 2006) in the city...


His personal life during this time remained irregular: he left his post in Breslau in a fit of frustration, he was on one occasion arrested for debt and fraud and expelled from Württemberg, and was involved in various scandals. However he remained successful as a composer, and also wrote a quantity of religious music, mainly for the Catholic mass. This however earned him the hostility of reformers working for the re-establishment of traditional chant in liturgy. Wrocław. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ... A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop. ...


In 1810, Weber visited several cities throughout Germany; from 1813 to 1816 he was director of the Opera in Prague; from 1816 to 1817 he worked in Berlin, and from 1817 onwards he was director of the prestigious Opera in Dresden, working hard to establish a German Opera, in reaction to the Italian Opera which had dominated the European music scene since the 18th century. 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: City of a Hundred Spires Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area    - City 496 km²  (191. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... Semper Oper in Dresden The Semper Oper (German: Semperoper) or Saxon State Opera Dresden (Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden) is an opera house in Dresden, Germany, and is one of the most famous in the world. ... For other uses, see Dresden (disambiguation). ... Italian opera can be divided into three periods, the Baroque, the Romantic and the modern. ...


The successful premiere of the opera Der Freischütz (18 June 1821, Berlin) led to performances all over Europe; it remains the only one of his operas still in the regular repertoire. Der Freischütz (English: The Freeshooter) is an opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a libretto by Friedrich Kind. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ...


Weber's colourful harmonies and orchestration, the use of popular themes from central European folk music, and the gloomy (gothic) libretto, complete with an appearance of the Devil himself in a nocturnal forest, have all helped to ensure its popularity. Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ...

The bust of Weber in Eutin
The bust of Weber in Eutin

In 1823 Weber composed the opera Euryanthe to a mediocre libretto, but containing much rich music. In 1824 Weber received an invitation from Covent Garden, London, to compose and produce Oberon, based on Christoph Martin Wieland's poem of the same name. Weber accepted the invitation, and in 1826 he travelled to England, to finish the work and be present at the performance on the 12 April. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (612x719, 139 KB) Description: Büste von Carl Maria von Weber im Weberhain seiner Geburtsstadt Eutin Source: own image/selbst fotografiert Author: Markus Würfel File links The following pages link to this file: Carl Maria von Weber ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (612x719, 139 KB) Description: Büste von Carl Maria von Weber im Weberhain seiner Geburtsstadt Eutin Source: own image/selbst fotografiert Author: Markus Würfel File links The following pages link to this file: Carl Maria von Weber ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Oberon, or The Elf Kings Oath is a romantic opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a English libretto by James Robinson Planche, after a poem by Christoph Martin Wieland. ... Christoph Martin Wieland (September 5, 1733 _ January 20, 1813), was a German poet and writer. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ...


Other famous works by Weber include: Invitation to the Dance (later orchestrated by Berlioz); Polacca Brillante; two symphonies, a concertino and two concertos for clarinet, a quintet for clarinet and strings, and a concertino for horn (during which the performer is asked to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing - a technique known in brass playing as "polyphonics"). A symphony is an extended piece of music for orchestra, especially one in the form of a sonata. ... Origin Etymology Concerto (from the Latin concertus, from certare, to strive, also confused with concentus), in its most general sense, is a name for a piece of classical music in which there are two distinct groups of instruments, one larger than the other. ... A quintet is a formation containing five members. ... The concertino for horn by Karl Maria von Weber is a famous, and famously taxing, work for the French horn. ...


Weber was already suffering from tuberculosis when he visited London; he died there during the night of 4 to 5 June 1826. He was buried in London, but 18 years later, his remains were transferred on an initiative of Richard Wagner and re-buried in Dresden. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Dresden (disambiguation). ...


His unfinished opera Die Drei Pintos ('The Three Pintos') was originally given by Weber's widow to Meyerbeer for completion; it was eventually completed by Gustav Mahler who conducted the first performance in this form in Leipzig on 20 January 1888. This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

 Weber's grave in Dresden
Weber's grave in Dresden

Image File history File links Webergrave. ... Image File history File links Webergrave. ...

Assessment

Weber was a great pianist and conductor. He had a greater knowledge of the orchestra than Schubert or Beethoven, even if, overall, he was a lesser composer than either. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ...


His music was more performance-oriented than that of Beethoven and especially that of Schubert, albeit intellectually not on the same level as either. However, in the 19th century works such as the Polacca Brillante, Invitation to the Dance, and the Konzertstück in F minor were regularly performed.


Weber's piano music all but disappeared from the repertoire, but there has been a revival of interest in these works in recent times. There are several recordings of the major works for the solo piano (including complete recordings of the piano sonatas and the shorter piano pieces, by Garrick Ohlsson, Alexander Paley and others), and there are excellent recordings of the individual sonatas by Claudio Arrau (1st Sonata), Alfred Brendel (2nd Sonata), Sviatoslav Richter (3rd Sonata) and Leon Fleischer (4th Sonata). The Invitation to the Dance, although better known in Berlioz's orchestration (as part of the ballet music for a Paris production of Der Freischutz), has long been played and recorded by pianists. Garrick Ohlsson (born, April 3, 1948) in New York is an American classical pianist. ... Claudio Arrau Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991) was a Chilean pianist of world fame for his deep interpretations of a huge, vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers. ... Alfred Brendel Alfred Brendel (born January 5, 1931) is an Austrian pianist, born in Czechoslovakia. ... Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter ( Russian: ; March 20 [O.S. March 7] 1915 – August 1, 1997) was a Ukrainian pianist of the Soviet era. ... Leon Fleisher Leon Fleisher (born July 23, 1928) is an American pianist and conductor. ...


His orchestral music and his opera Der Freischutz, his most famous composition by far, are still performed.


Works

Operas

  • Die Macht der Liebe und des Weins, J. Anh. 6, 1798-9, lost;
  • Das Waldmädchen, (Das stumme Waldmädchen), J. Anh. 1, 1800, frags; libretto by C. von Steinsberg; rev. as Silvana (1810)
  • Peter Schmoll und seine Nachbarn, J. 8, 1802; libretto by Josef Türk
  • Rübezahl, J. 44-6, 1804-5; libretto by J.G. Rhode; 3 nos. survive; ov. rev. 1811 as Der Beherrscher der Geister
  • Silvana, J. 87, 1810; libretto by Franz Karl Hiemer
  • Abu Hassan, 1811; libretto by Franz Karl Hiemer
  • Der Freischütz op.77 J.277, 1821; libretto by Johann Friedrich Kind
  • Euryanthe op.81 J.291, 1823; libretto by Helmina von Chézy
  • Oberon or The Elf Kings Oath J.306, 1826; libretto by James Robinson Planché
  • Die drei Pintos J. Anh. 5, 1821, inc; libretto by Theodore Hell; new libretto by Carl von Weber (the composer's grandson) and Gustav Mahler; score completed by Mahler based on surviving sketches and new music based on little-known pieces by Weber.

Peter Schmoll und seine Nachbarn (Peter Schmoll and his Neighbours) is the third opera by Carl Maria von Weber and the first for which the music has survived. ... Rübezahl, Moritz von Schwind, 1859 Rübezahl (Czech: Krakonoš, Polish: Liczyrzepa) is the mountain spirit (woodwose) of the Karkonosze Mountains (also known as the Giant Mountains or the Riesengebirge) along the modern border between Poland and the Czech Republic. ... Silvana is an opera by Carl Maria von Weber, first performed in Frankfurt am Main on 16 September 1810. ... Abu Hassan is an opera in one act by Carl Maria von Weber to a German libretto by Franz Hiemer, based on a story in A Thousand and One Nights. ... Der Freischütz (English: The Freeshooter) is an opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a libretto by Friedrich Kind. ... Euryanthe is a German Romantic opera by Carl Maria von Weber, first performed at the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna on 25 October 1823. ... Oberon, or The Elf Kings Oath is a romantic opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a English libretto by James Robinson Planche, after a poem by Christoph Martin Wieland. ... James Robinson Planché in 1835 James Robinson Planché (February 27, 1796 – May 30, 1880), was a dramatist, officer of arms and miscellaneous writer. ... Die drei Pintos (The Three Pintos) is a comic opera by Carl Maria von Weber with a libretto by Theodore Hell. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ...

Church music

  • Missa sancta No. 1 in Eb J.224 (1818)
  • Missa sancta No. 2 in G op.76 J.251 (1818-19)

Vocal works with orchestra

  • Cantata Der erste Ton for chorus and orchestra op.14 J.58 (1808 / revised 1810)
  • Recitative and rondo Il momento s'avvicina for soprano and orchestra op.16 J.93 (1810)
  • Hymn In seiner Ordnung schafft der Herr for soloists, chorus and orchestra op.36 J.154 (1812)
  • Cantata Kampf und Sieg for soloists, chorus and orchestra op.44 J.190 (1815)
  • Scene and Aria of Atalia Misera me! for soprano and orchestra op.50 J.121 (1811)
  • Jubel-Cantata for the 50th royal jubillee of King Friedrich August I of Saxony for soloist, chorus and orchestra op.58 J.244 (1818)

Concertos

  • Piano concerto No. 1 in C major op. 11 J.98 (1810)
  • Piano concerto No. 2 in E flat major op. 32 J.155 (1812)
  • Bassoon concerto in F major for op. 75 J.127 (1811 / revised 1822)
  • Clarinet concerto No. 1 in F minor op. 73 J.114 (1811)
  • Clarinet concerto No. 2 in E flat major, Opus 74 J.118 (1811)
  • Grand pot-pourri for cello and orchestra in D major op. 20 J.64 (1808)
  • Concertino for clarinet and orchestra in C minor/E flat major, op. 26 J.109 (1811)
  • Konzertstück for horn and orchestra in E minor op. 45 J.188 (1815)
  • Konzertstück for piano and orchestra in F minor op. 79 J.282 (1821)
  • Romanza siciliana for flute and orchestra J.47 (1805)
  • Six variations on the theme A Schüsserl und a Reind'rl for viola and orchestra J.49 (1800 / revised 1806)
  • Andante and rondo Hungarian for die viola and orchestra J.79 (1809)
  • Variations for cello and orchestra in D minor J.94 (1810)
  • Adagio and rondo for harmonichord and orchestra in F major J.115 (1811)
  • Andante and rondo Hungarian for bassoon and orchestra in C minor op. 35 J.158 (1813) revised as J.79

External links

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Carl Maria von Weber (500 words)
With help from Franz Danzi, intellectual stimulation from his friends Gänsbacher, Meyerbeer, Gottfried Weber and Alexander von Dusch and the encouragement of concert and operatic successes in Munich (especially Abu Hassan), Prague and Berlin, he settled down as opera director in Prague (1813-16).
Weber won his widest audience with Freischütz, outwardly a Singspiel celebrating German folklore and country life, using an idiom touched by German folksong.
In Oberon Weber reverted to separate numbers to suit English taste, yet the work retains his characteristically subtle motivic handling and depiction of both natural and supernatural elements.
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