FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Caribbean Sea
Map of Central America and the Caribbean

The Caribbean Sea (pronounced /kəˈɹɪbiən/ or /ˌkæɹɪˈbiːən/) is a tropical sea in the Western Hemisphere, part of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Gulf of Mexico. A mediterranean sea, it covers most of the Caribbean Plate and is bounded on the south by South America, on the west and south by Mexico and Central America, and on the north and east by the Antilles: the Greater Antilles islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico lie to the north, and a plethora of Lesser Antilles bound the sea on the east. The entire area of the Caribbean Sea, the numerous islands of the West Indies, and adjacent coasts, are collectively known as the Caribbean. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 783 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1392 × 1066 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 783 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1392 × 1066 pixel, file size: 1. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... A noontime scene from the Philippines on a day when the Sun is almost directly overhead. ... This article is about the body of water. ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... A mediterranean sea, in oceanography, is a mostly enclosed sea that has limited exchange of deep water with outer oceans and where the water circulation is dominated by salinity and temperature differences rather than winds. ... Detail of tectonic plates from: Tectonic plates of the world. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... The Antilles (the same in French; Antillas in Spanish; Antillen in Dutch) refers to the islands forming the greater part of the West Indies in the Caribbean. ... The Greater Antilles, an island group in the Caribbean Sea, are part of the Antilles. ... Early map of Hispaniola The island of Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... Location of the Lesser Antilles (green) in relation to the rest of the Caribbean Islands of the Lesser Antilles The Lesser Antilles, also known as the Caribbees,[1] are part of the Antilles, which together with the Bahamas and Greater Antilles form the West Indies. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ...


The Caribbean Sea is one of the largest salt water seas and has an area of about 2,754,000 km² (1,063,000 square miles)[1]. The sea's deepest point is the Cayman Trough, between Cuba and Jamaica, at 7,686 m (25,220 ft) below sea level. The Caribbean coastline has many gulfs and bays: the Gulf of Venezuela, Gulf of Darien, Golfo de los Mosquitos and Gulf of Honduras. Satellite image of the Cayman Trough. ... Satellite image of the Gulf of Venezuela The Gulf of Venezuela is a gulf of the Carribean Sea bounded by the Venezuelan states of Zulia and Falcón. ... The Gulf of Darién is the southernmost region of the Caribbean Sea, located north and east of the border between Panama and Colombia. ... A gulf along the north coast of Panama, extending from the Valiente Peninsula in Bocas del Toro, past the north coast of Veraguas to the province of Colon, Panama. ... Missing image Map of Belize, showing the Gulf of Honduras The Gulf or Bay of Honduras is a large inlet of the Caribbean Sea, indenting the coasts of Belize, Honduras and Guatemala. ...

Contents

History

The name "Caribbean" is derived from the Caribs one of the dominant American Indian groups in the region at the time of European contact during the late 15th century. After the discovery of the West Indies by Christopher Columbus in 1492, the Spanish term Antillas was commonly assigned to the lands; stemming from this, "Sea of the Antilles" is a common alternate name for the Caribbean Sea in various European languages. During the first century of development, the Spanish dominance was undisputed. The Caribbean The History of the Caribbean reveals the significant role the region played in the colonial struggles of the European powers between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ... The Antilles (the same in French; Antillas in Spanish; Antillen in Dutch) refers to the islands forming the greater part of the West Indies in the Caribbean. ...


The Caribbean Sea was an unknown body of water to the populations of Eurasia until 1492 when Christopher Columbus first sailed into Caribbean waters while trying to find a route to India. At that time the Western Hemisphere in general was unknown to Europeans. Following the discovery of the islands by Columbus, the area was quickly colonized by several Western Civilizations. Following the colonization of the Caribbean islands, the Sea became a busy area for European-based marine trading and transport, and this commerce eventually attracted piracy. For other uses, see Eurasia (disambiguation). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... This article is about maritime piracy. ...


Today the area is home to 22 island territories and borders 12 continental countries. Because of an abundance of sunshine, year-round tropical temperatures moderated by the almost constant trade winds, and the great variety of scenic destinations to visit, during the second half of the 20th century on into the 21st, the Caribbean Sea became a popular place for tourism, and this trend has favored the in creasing development of the cruise industry in the area (see Cruising and Cruise ship). The trade winds are a pattern of wind found in bands around Earths equatorial region. ... A cruising sailboat anchored in the San Blas Islands, in Panama. ... Pacific Sky sails under Sydney Harbour Bridge A cruise ship or a cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ships amenities are considered an essential part of the experience. ...


Geology

The Caribbean Sea is a mediterranean sea largely situated on the Caribbean Plate. Estimates of the sea's age range from 20,000 years to 570 million years. The Caribbean sea floor is divided into five basins separated from each other by underwater ridges and mountain ranges. Atlantic Ocean enters the Caribbean through the Anegada Passage lying between the Lesser Antilles and Virgin Islands and the Windward Passage located between Cuba and Haiti. The deepest points of the sea lie in Cayman Trough with depths reaching approximately 7,686 m (25,220 ft). Despite this, the Caribbean Sea is considered a relatively shallow sea in comparison to other bodies of water. Detail of tectonic plates from: Tectonic plates of the world. ... Diagrammatic cross-section of an ocean basin, showing the various geographic features. ... Location of the Lesser Antilles (green) in relation to the rest of the Caribbean Islands of the Lesser Antilles The Lesser Antilles, also known as the Caribbees,[1] are part of the Antilles, which together with the Bahamas and Greater Antilles form the West Indies. ... Satellite image of the Cayman Trough. ...


The Caribbean sea floor is also home to two oceanic trenches: the Hispaniola Trench and Puerto Rico Trench, which put the area at a higher risk of earthquakes. Underwater earthquakes pose a threat of generating tsunamis which could have a devastating effect on the Caribbean islands. Scientific data reveals that over the last 500 years the area has seen a dozen earthquakes above 7.5 magnitude. [2] The oceanic trenches are hemispheric-scale long but narrow topographic depressions of the sea floor. ... Location map Puerto Rico trench - USGS The Puerto Rico Trench is an oceanic trench located on the boundary between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... For other uses, see Tsunami (disambiguation). ...


Ecology

A view of the Caribbean Sea from the Dominican Republic coast
A view of the Caribbean Sea from the Dominican Republic coast

The Caribbean is home to about 9% of the world's coral reefs covering about 20,000 square miles (50,000 km²), most of which are located off the Caribbean Islands and the Central American coast.[3] Currently, unusually warm Caribbean waters are endangering the Caribbean coral reefs. Coral Reefs support some of the most diverse habitats in the world, but are fragile ecosystems. When tropical waters exceed 85 degrees Fahrenheit for an extended period of time, microscopic plants called zooxanthellae die off. These plant provide food for the coral and give them their color. The resultant bleaching of the coral reefs kills them, and ruins the ecosystem. Up to 42% of the coral colonies have gone completely white, while 95% have undergone at least some bleaching.[4] The habitats supported by the reefs are critical to such tourist activities such as fishing and diving, and provide an annual economic value to Caribbean nations of $3.1-$4.6 billion. Continued destruction of the reefs could severely damage the region's economy.[5] A Protocol of the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region came in effect in 1986 to protect the various endangered marine life of the Caribbean through forbidding human activities that would advance the continued destruction of such marine life in various areas. Currently this protocol has been ratified by 15 countries. [6] Also several charitable organizations have been formed to preserve the Caribbean marine life, such as Caribbean Conservation Corporation which seeks to study and protect sea turtles while educating others about them.[7] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 774 KB) Summary Mar Caribe Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Caribbean Sea Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 774 KB) Summary Mar Caribe Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Caribbean Sea Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Some of the biodiversity of a coral reef, in this case the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... Zooxanthellae are golden-brown endosymbionts of various marine animals and protozoa. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... Ratification is the process of adopting an international treaty, or a constitution or other nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple subnational entities. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Weather

Average sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the Caribbean Atlantic Ocean(25 August-27 August 2005.
Average sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the Caribbean Atlantic Ocean(25 August-27 August 2005.[8]

The Caribbean weather is influenced by the Gulf Stream and Humboldt Current ocean currents.[9] The tropical location of the sea helps the water to maintain a warm temperature ranging from the low of 70 to mid-80 degrees Fahrenheit by the season. ImageMetadata File history File links NASA_ASMR-E_image_of_average_SSTs_of_Hurricane_Katrina. ... ImageMetadata File history File links NASA_ASMR-E_image_of_average_SSTs_of_Hurricane_Katrina. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... ... Ocean currents (1911) Ocean currents (1943) An ocean current is any more or less continuous, directed movement of ocean water that flows in one of the Earths oceans. ... This article is about the temperature scale; see also Fahrenheit graphics API. Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


The Caribbean is a focal area for many hurricanes within the Western Hemisphere. A series of low pressure systems develop off the West coast of Africa and make their way across the Atlantic Ocean. While most of these systems do not become tropical storms, some do. The tropical storms can develop into Atlantic hurricanes, often in the low pressure areas of the eastern Caribbean. The Caribbean hurricane season as a whole lasts from June to December, with the majority of hurricanes occurring during August and September. On average around 9 tropical storms form each year, with 5 reaching hurricane strength. According to the National Hurricane Center 385 hurricanes occurred in the Caribbean between 1494 and 1900. Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... Atlantic hurricane refers to a tropical cyclone that forms in the Atlantic Ocean north of the equator, usually in the Northern Hemisphere summer or autumn. ... National Weather Service Logo The U.S. National Hurricane Center is the division of National Weather Services Tropical Prediction Center responsible for tracking and predicting the likely behavior of tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes. ...


Every year, hurricanes represent a potential threat to the islands of the Caribbean, due to the extremely destructive nature of these powerful weather systems. Coral reefs can easily be damaged by violent wave action, and can be destroyed when a hurricane dumps sand or mud onto the a reef. When this happens, the coral organisms are smothered and the reef dies and ultimately breaks apart.


Economy and human activity

A Caribbean beach in Isla Margarita, Venezuela.
A Caribbean beach in Isla Margarita, Venezuela.

The Caribbean region has seen a significant increase in human activity since the colonization period. The sea is one of the largest oil production areas in the world, producing approximately 170 million tons per year.[10] The area also generates a large fishing industry for the surrounding countries, accounting for half a million metric tons of fish a year.[11] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1426 KB) Summary A beach in Margarita Island in Venezuela. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1426 KB) Summary A beach in Margarita Island in Venezuela. ... Puerto Cruz beach. ...


Human activity in the area also accounts for a significant amount of pollution, Pan American Health Organization estimating in 1993 that only about 10% of the sewage from the Central American and Caribbean Island countries is properly treated before being released into the Sea.[10]


The Caribbean region supports a large tourist industry. The Caribbean Tourism Organization calculates that about 12 million people a year visit the area, including (in 1991–1992) about 8 million Cruise Ship tourists.[citation needed]


Popular culture

The Caribbean is the setting for countless literary efforts often related to piracy and swashbuckling. One memorable work of pulp fiction has in its title a geographic feature unique in its way to the islands: Fear Cay, the eleventh Doc Savage adventure by Lester Dent. Many James Bond adventures were set there. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article is about maritime piracy. ... A Swashbuckler is a term that came about in the 16th century and was applied to rough, noisy, boastful swordsman. To swash is to swagger and swing about, making a lot of noise and a buckler is a shield. The stock character Miles Glorioso is a swashbuckler. ... Doc Savage is a fictional character, one of the most enduring pulp heroes of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Lester Dent (b. ... Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ...


The area is also the setting for the well-known Disneyland and Disney World attraction, Pirates of the Caribbean, which among other things is notable for cementing the alternative pronunciation (with the stress placed on the first and third syllables instead of the second) in many people's minds[citation needed]. The ride has been adapted into a trilogy of Pirates of the Caribbean films, the first two of which take place in the Caribbean. For other uses, see Disneyland (disambiguation). ... Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, three water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses... Pirates of the Caribbean is a multi-billion dollar Walt Disney franchise encompassing a theme park ride, a series of films and spinoff novels as well as numerous video games and other publications. ... The Pirates of the Caribbean films are a trilogy of pirate adventure films directed by Gore Verbinski, written by Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. ...


See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ The Caribbean Sea All The Sea. URL last accessed May 07, 2006
  2. ^ Dawicki, Shelley. Tsunamis in the Caribbean? It's Possible.. Oceanus. Retrieved on April 30, 2006.
  3. ^ Status of coral reefs in the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean World Resource Institute. URL accessed on April 29, 2006.
  4. ^ Bleaching Threatens Caribbean Coral Reefs. CBS News. URL accessed on April 29, 2006.
  5. ^ Alarm sounded for Caribbean coral. BBC News. URL accessed on April 29, 2006.
  6. ^ Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife to the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (SPAW) NOAA Fisheries: Office of Protected Resources. URL accessed on April 30, 2006.
  7. ^ Caribbean Conservation Corporation Orion Online. URL last accessed May 1, 2006.
  8. ^ NASA Satellites Record a Month for the Hurricane History Books
  9. ^ Silverstein, Alvin (1998) Weather And Climate (Science Concepts); page 17. 21st Century. ISBN 0-7613-3223-5
  10. ^ a b An Overview of Land Based Sources of Marine Pollution Caribbean Environment Programme. URL last accessed May 14, 2006.
  11. ^ LME 12: Caribbean Sea NOAA Fisheries Northeast Fisheries Science Center Narragansett Laboratory. URL last accessed May 14, 2006.

is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Snyderman, Marty (1996) Guide to Marine Life : Caribbean-Bahamas-Florida; page 13-14, 19. Aqua Quest Publications, Inc. ISBN 1-881652-06-8
  • Glover K., Linda (2004) Defying Ocean's End : An Agenda For Action; page 9. Island Press. ISBN 1-55963-755-2
  • Peters, Philip Dickenson (2003) Caribbean WOW 2.0; page 100. Islandguru Media. ISBN 1-929970-04-8
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Coordinates: 14°31′32″N, 75°49′06″W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Caribbean Sea - MSN Encarta (294 words)
Caribbean Sea, arm of the Atlantic Ocean, partially enclosed on the north and east by the islands of the West Indies, and bounded on the south by South America and Panama, and on the west by Central America.
The name of the sea is derived from the Carib people, who inhabited the area when Spanish explorers arrived there in the 15th century.
The main oceanic current in the Caribbean Sea is an extension of the North Equatorial and South Equatorial currents, which enter the sea at the southeastern extremity and flow in a generally northwestern direction.
Central America and The Caribbean - Images (375 words)
Travel Images Central America and The Caribbean Sea Islands.
Union Interactive Map of, Images of Central America and The Caribbean Sea Islands.
Images of Central America and The Caribbean Sea Islands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m