FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Caribbean English

Caribbean English is a broad term for the dialects of the English language spoken in the Caribbean, most countries on the Caribbean coast of Central America, and Guyana. Caribbean English is influenced by the English-based Creole varieties spoken, but they are not one and the same. In the Caribbean, there is a great deal of variation in the way English is spoken. Scholars generally agree that although the dialects themselves vary significantly in each of these countries, they all have roots in 17th-century English and African languages. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The term African languages refers to the approximately 1800 languages spoken in Africa. ...


Overview

Examples of the English in daily use in the Caribbean include a different set of pronouns, typically, me, meh, or mi, you, yuh, he, she, it, we, wi or alawe, allyuh or unu, and dem or day. I, mi, my, he, she, ih, it, we, wi or alawe, allayu' or unu, and dem, den, deh for "them" with Central Americans. The so-called "dropping the 'h'" or th-stopping in th- words is common. Some might be "sing-songish" (Trinidad, Bahamas), rhotic (Bajan, Guyanese), influenced by Irish English dialects (Jamaican), or have an accent influenced by any of these, as well as Spanish and indigenous languages in the case of the Central American English dialects such as the Belizean Creole (Kriol), or the Mískito Coastal Creole and Rama Cay Creole spoken in Nicaragua. However, the English used in media, education and business and in formal or semi-formal discourse is the International Standard variety with a Afro-Caribbean cadence. In linguistics, rhotic can refer to: a rhotic consonant such as IPA a rhotic accent such as General American an r-colored vowel such as IPA This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hiberno-English is the form of the English language used in Ireland. ... Central America is the region of North America located between the southern border of Mexico and the northwest border of Colombia, in South America. ... Belizean Creole, also called Belizean Kriol, Kriol or Belizean, is closely related to Miskito Coastal Creole, Colón Creole, and San Andrés and Providencia Creole. ... Mískito Coastal Creole is a language spoken in Nicaragua based on English. ... Rama Cay Creole is a creole language spoken by some 8-900 people on the island of Rama Cay in eastern Nicaragua. ... International English is the concept of the English language as a global means of communication in numerous dialects, and the movement towards an international standard for the language. ...


Standard English - Where is that boy?

  • Barbados - 'Wherr iz dat boi?' (Spoken very quickly in a choppy, rhotic, distinct accent; Similar to an Irish accent)
  • Jamaica, and Antigua and Barbuda- 'Whierr iz daaht buoy?' (Distinctive, sporadic rhoticity; Irish and Scottish influence)
  • Trinidad and Bahamas - 'Weyr iz daut boy?' (Very similar to the accents of south western England and Wales; Has no rhoticy)
  • Guyana, Tobago, St. Vincent - 'Weyr iz daht bai?'. (Many variations depending of Afro- or Indo- descent, and compentancy in standard English; Sporadic rhoticity )
  • Belize, Panama, Nicaragua, The Bay Islands, Limón, and the Virgin Islands - 'Wehr iz daat bouy?' (Distinct, sporadic rhoticity, pronunciation becomes quite different from "creole" pronunciation.

The written form of the language in the former and current British West Indies conforms to spelling and grammar styles of Britain and the rest of the Commonwealth. Look up Trinidad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Castara village beach looking south, Tobago Tobago is the smaller of the two main islands that make up the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. ... Motto: Pax et justitia (Latin: Peace and justice) Anthem: St Vincent Land So Beautiful Capital (and largest city) Kingstown Official languages English Government Parliamentary democracy Commonwealth Realm  - Monarch Queen Elizabeth II  - Governor-General Sir Frederick Ballantyne  - Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves Independence From the United Kingdom   - Date 27 October 1979  Area... Islas de la Bahía (Bay Islands) is one of the 18 departments (departamentos) into which the Central American nation of Honduras is divided. ... Limón is a province of Costa Rica. ...


Caribbean countries where English is an official language or where English-based creole languages are widespread include: A creole language, or simply a creole, is a stable language that originated from a non-trivial combination of two or more languages, typically with many features that are not inherited from any parent. ...

English is an official language in Puerto Rico, although Spanish is the main language of the local government and population. San Andrés and Providencia (Spanish: San Andrés y Providencia) is a department of Colombia. ... Limón is a province of Costa Rica. ... Islas de la Bahía (Bay Islands) is one of the 18 departments (departamentos) into which the Central American nation of Honduras is divided. ... Saint Martin - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Saint Martin is a tropical island in the northeast Caribbean, approximately 150 miles east of Puerto Rico. ... Motto Remis Velisque (Latin) With oars and sails (English) Anthem Saba you rise from the ocean Capital The Bottom Largest city The Bottom Official languages Dutch, English (unofficial) Government See Politics of the Netherlands Antilles  -  Saba Administrator A.J.M. Solagnier  -  Governor of N.A. Frits Goedgedrag Constitutional monarchy part... Map showing location of Sint Eustatius relative to Saba and Sint Maarten/Saint Martin Sint Eustatius (also Saint Eustace and Statia), pop. ... The article is about the Central American area. ... The Corn Islands (Las Islas del Maíz in Spanish) are a pair of islands belonging to the Nicaraguan region Región Autónoma del Atlántico Sur (RAAS), Big Corn Island (Isla Grande del Maíz) and Little Corn Island (Isla Pequeña del Maíz). ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
English language at AllExperts (6043 words)
English was spread to many parts of the world through the expansion of the British Empire, but it did not acquire a lingua franca status in other parts of the world until the late 20th century.
English is also the most widely used language for young backpackers who travel across continents, regardless of whether it is their mother tongue or a secondary language.
English is the most widely learned and used foreign language, and as such, some linguists believe that it is no longer the exclusive cultural sign of 'native English speakers', but is rather a language that is absorbing aspects of cultures world-wide as it continues to grow.
West Indies: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1755 words)
The Caribbean (Dutch: Caraïben; French: Caraïbes; Spanish: Caribe) is a region of the Americas consisting of the Caribbean Sea, its islands (most of which enclose the sea), and the surrounding coasts.
The name "Caribbean" is named after the Caribs, one of the dominant Amerindian groups in the region at the time of European contact during the late 15th century.
The use of the words "Caribbean" and "Caribbeans" to refer to a West Indian or West Indians is largely unknown in the English-speaking Caribbean.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m