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Encyclopedia > Cardiff
City of Cardiff
Dinas Caerdydd
Administration
Constituent country Wales
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town CARDIFF
Postal districts CF3, CF5, CF10, CF11, CF14, CF23, CF24, CF99
Dialling code 029
Vehicle codes CA-CO
Police Force South Wales Police
Fire Service South Wales Fire and Rescue Service
Ambulance Service Welsh Ambulance Service
Demographics
Population City: 317,500 (2006)
Urban: 327,706 (2001)
Population density (City) 2268 per km² (2006)
Ethnicity 91.57% White
1.99% Mixed
3.96% S. Asian
1.28% Black
1.20% Chinese or other.
Welsh language
- Any skills
Ranked 18th
16.3%
Flag
Politics

Cardiff Council
http://www.cardiff.gov.uk/
Control NOC (Liberal Democrat administration)
Welsh Assembly and UK Parliament Constituencies
European Parliament Wales

Cardiff (English: Cardiff , Welsh: Caerdydd ) is the capital and by far the largest city of Wales. Located on the south coast of the country it is administered as a unitary authority. It is in the historic county of Glamorgan. Today, it is the 10th largest city, one place behind Manchester in the United Kingdom and part of the Eurocities network of the largest European cities[1]. Cardiff for the city in Wales Cardiff-by-the-Sea, California for the community in Encinitas, California Cardiff, Pakistan for the village in Pakistan Cardiff (film) for the 2005 film set in Cardiff This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... one of the subdivisions of Wales File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... This article is about the country. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... This is a list of the post towns of the United Kingdom sorted in postcode sequence. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... 0207 and 0208 are erroneous British telephone STD codes, which are commonly and incorrectly quoted in speech and writing by residents of the United Kingdom instead of the correct code of 020 for London. ... British car number plates have existed in the United Kingdom since 1904. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... South Wales Police (Welsh: ) is one of the four Home Office police forces in Wales. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The South Wales Fire and Rescue Service (Welsh Gwasanaeth Tân ac Achub De Cymru) is the fire and rescue service covering the ten Welsh principal areas of Blaenau Gwent, Bridgend, Caerphilly, Cardiff, Merthyr Tydfil, Monmouthshire, Newport, Rhondda Cynon Taff, Torfaen and Vale of Glamorgan. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Welsh Ambulance Service (also called the Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust or Ymddiriedolaeth GIG Gwasanaethau Ambiwlans Cymru) was established on April 1, 1998 and has 2,500 staff providing ambulance and related services to the 2. ... This is a list of principal areas of Wales ordered by population. ... A conurbation is formed when towns expand sufficiently that their urban areas join up with each other. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... This is a List of Welsh principal areas by the percentage of those professing some skills in the Welsh language in the 2001 UK census. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Arms of Cardiff This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Cardiff Council (Welsh: ) is the governing body for Cardiff, one of the Principal Areas of Wales. ... NOC can refer to: National Olympic Committee, a group eligible to enter athletes and teams into an Olympic Games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The National Assembly for Wales (or NAW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) was established in 1998, following a 1997 referendum in which a small majority of voters (but not the electorate) voted in favour of the Labour Governments plans for devolution. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Cardiff West (Gorllewin Caerdydd in Welsh) is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Cardiff South and Penarth (De Caerdydd a Phenarth in Welsh) is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Cardiff North (Gogledd Caerdydd in Welsh) is an electoral constituency represented in the National Assembly for Wales and in the UK Parliaments House of Commons. ... The term Cardiff Central has several meanings: Cardiff Central station Cardiff Central (UK Parliament constituency) Cardiff Central (National Assembly for Wales constituency) Cardiff central bus station Cardiff city centre Category: ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... This article is about the country. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Image File history File links Cardiff. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Image File history File links Caerdydd. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Wales has thirteen historic counties. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... The Eurocities network was founded in 1986 by Mayors from six large European cities. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


It was a small town until the early 19th century and came to prominence as a major port for the transport of coal following the arrival of industry in the region. It eventually grew to become the largest city in Wales and serves as a major centre of culture, sport and history in the United Kingdom. Cardiff was made a city in 1905, and proclaimed capital of Wales in 1955. Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... This article is about the Welsh capital. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Geography

Geology

Cardiff is a relatively flat city and its geographic features were influential in its development as one of the world's largest coal ports. Most notably this included its proximity and easy access to the coal fields of the south Wales valleys.

Satellite image of Cardiff, showing vegetation and land cover. Barry is shown bottom left
Satellite image of Cardiff, showing vegetation and land cover. Barry is shown bottom left

Cardiff is built on reclaimed marshland on a bed of Triassic stones; this reclaimed marshland stretches from Chepstow to the Ely Estuary, which is the natural boundary of Cardiff and the Vale of Glamorgan. Triassic landscapes are usually shallow and low-lying which accounts and explains Cardiff's flatness. The classic Triassic marl, sand and conglomerate rocks are used predominantly throughout Cardiff as building materials. Many of these Triassic rocks have a purple complexion, especially the coastal marl found near Penarth. One of the Triassic rocks used in Cardiff is "Radyr Stone", a freestone which as it name suggests is quarried in the Radyr district. Cardiff has also imported some materials for buildings: Devonian sandstones (the Old Red Sandstone) from the Brecon Beacons has been used. Most famously, the superbly elegant buildings of Cathays Park, arguably Britain's finest civic centre buildings are built of Portland stone which was imported from Dorset. A widely used building stone in Cardiff is the surreal yellow-grey Liassic limestone rock of the Vale of Glamorgan, including the very rare "Sutton Stone", a conglomerate of lias limestone and carboniferous limestone that is, apart from Radyr Stone, the only free-stone in south-east Wales (freestones can be cut to a perfectly smooth surface). The yellowish complexion of the lias limestone used mainly in the city centre gives Cardiff an unusually sunny, light and breezy complexion for a city in Britain. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 623 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2270 × 2186 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 623 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2270 × 2186 pixel, file size: 2. ... Barry (Welsh: ) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. ... The Triassic is a geologic period that extends from about 251 ± 0. ... , Chepstow (Welsh: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Wales—England (Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire) border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ... Marls are calcium carbonate or lime rich muds or mudstones which contain variable amounts of clays and calcite or aragonite. ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ... A conglomerate with iron oxide cementing material Conglomerate, Submarine Landslide located at Point Reyes, Marin County California. ... Marls are calcium carbonate or lime rich muds or mudstones which contain variable amounts of clays and calcite or aragonite. ... A freestone is a stone used in architecture for molding, tracery and other work required to be worked with the chisel. ... For the Celtic language, see Southwestern Brythonic language; for the residents of the English county, see Devon. ... The Old Red Sandstone is a rock formation of considerable importance to early paleontology. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons, looking from the highest point Pen y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Cribyn, 795 m (2608 feet) The Brecon Beacons (Welsh: Bannau Brycheiniog) are a mountain range located in the south-east of Wales. ... Cathays Park is a civic area in central Cardiff, Wales, consisting of a number of early 20th century buildings and a central park area. ... The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... Massive cliffs in Zion Canyon consist of Lower Jurassic formations, including (from bottom to top): the Wingate Sandstone, the Kayenta Formation, and the massive Navajo Sandstone. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ... President Bush- Deres gold in dem dere mines The Carboniferous is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Devonian period, about 359. ...


Cardiff is bordered to the west by the rural district of the Vale of Glamorgan, which is also known as The Garden of Cardiff,[2] to the east by the city of Newport, to the north by the South Wales Valleys and to the south by the Severn Estuary and Bristol Channel. The River Taff winds through the centre of the city and together with the River Ely flows into the freshwater lake of Cardiff Bay. A third river, the Rhymney flows through the east of the city entering directly into the Severn Estuary. A fourth river, the Lleucu has been culverted.[3] For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... The South Wales Valleys are a number of industrialised valleys in South Wales. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... Satellite view of the Bristol Channel Map of the Bristol Channel The Bristol Channel (Welsh: ) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from the West Country and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn (Afon Hafren) to that part of the North... The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ... The River Ely is a small river in south Wales. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... The Rhymney River is a river in the Rhymney Valley, south Wales, flowing into the Bristol Channel. ...

Penarth Pier at the Esplanade, Penarth Seafront.

Cardiff is situated near to the Glamorgan Heritage Coast, stretching westward from Penarth and Barry (which are commuter towns of Cardiff), with its striped yellow-blue Jurassic "lias" limestone cliffs that thrust outwards towards the Bristol Channel. The Glamorgan coast is the only part of the Celtic Sea that has exposed Jurassic (blue lias) geology. This west facing stretch of coast, which takes the brunt of brutal Atlantic westerlies and has reefs, sandbanks and serrated cliffs aplenty (like Cornwall) was a ship graveyard during the age of sail; ships sailing up to Cardiff during the industrial era often never made it as far as Cardiff as most were wrecked around this hostile coastline during brutal west/south-westerly gales. Consequently, just like its Celtic cousin in Cornwall, smuggling, deliberate shipwrecking and attacks on ships became a way of life for many people living in the small coastal villages of the Vale. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 793 KB) Summary Penarth Pier at The Esplanade, Penarth. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 793 KB) Summary Penarth Pier at The Esplanade, Penarth. ... , Penarth (Welsh: pen head, + garth cliff or hill, or arth bear) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, lying on the north shore of the Severn estuary, and at the southern end of Cardiff Bay. ... For the type of foundation, see Deep foundation. ... St Clair Beach and esplanade, Dunedin, New Zealand Promenade at Rizal Boulevard in Dumaguete City, Philippines. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... A Heritage Coast is a strip of coastline designated by the Countryside Agency in England and Wales. ... Barry (Welsh: ) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. ... Map of the Celtic Sea, an arm of the Atlantic. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... Blue Lias is a form of limestone, laid down in Jurassic times. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ...


Cardiff is linked to the west Somerset/North Devon seaside resorts (such as Minehead, Ilfracombe and Lundy Island) via the Paddle Steamer Waverley and MV Balmoral, which sail from Penarth pier, as they have done for over 150 years. Sailing across the Bristol Channel to North Devon is a much a part of Cardiffian life as a pint of Brains and watching rugby union. In fact, Devon's tourist trade began in the 19th century when the paddle steamers spent weekends cruising the Bristol Channel taking the expanding population of Cardiff to places such as Lynmouth, Ilfracombe, Bideford and Clovelly. This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... , Minehead is a coastal town in West Somerset, England with a population of around 10,000. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ... The Old Light, Lundy For a map, see the end of this article Lundy is an island in the Bristol Channel of Great Britain, about a third of the way from Devon to the coast of South Wales. ... PS Waverley steaming down the Firth of Clyde - additional views at Image:PS Waverley off Brodick castle 1989. ... The M.V. Balmoral (built in 1949) is a traditional passenger ship. ... Founded in 1882, SA Brain & Company Ltd, popularly known as Brains, is a brewery in Wales that produces a number of traditional ales in the heart of Cardiff. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Lynmouth is a village in Devon, England. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... Clovelly is a village on the north Devon coast, England near Bideford. ...

Destinations from CARDIFF
Llantrisant Pontypridd, Merthyr Tydfil, Caerphilly
 
Newport, Cwmbran
Cowbridge, Bridgend
N
W E
S
Bristol Channel
Llantwit Major, Cardiff International Airport, Barry Penarth, Dinas Powys
 
Bristol Channel

Llantrisant is a town in the county borough of Rhondda Cynon Taff, traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales, lying on the River Ely and the River Clun. ... , Pontypridd is a town in Glamorgan, Wales, in the county borough of Rhondda Cynon Taf. ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ... Liam is a legend and lives in trecenydd Caerphilly (Welsh: Caerffili) is a town in South Wales, located at the bottom of the Rhymney Valley, with a population of approximately 31,000. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... , Cwmbran (Welsh: Cwmbrân) is a new town in southern Wales, established in the 1950s to provide new employment in the south eastern portion of the South Wales Coalfield. ... Cowbridge (Welsh: Y Bont-faen) is a market town in the Vale of Glamorgan, south Wales. ... Bridgend (Welsh: Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr) is a town in the traditional county of Glamorgan and the main town in the county borough of Bridgend in south Wales. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Satellite view of the Bristol Channel Map of the Bristol Channel The Bristol Channel (Welsh: ) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from the West Country and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn (Afon Hafren) to that part of the North... View From Llantwit Major Beach Across The Bristol Channel Llantwit Major (Welsh: Llanilltud Fawr -- llan church enclosure + Illtud + mawr great) is a small coastal town and community in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales, lying on the Bristol Channel coast. ... Cardiff International Airport (Welsh: Maes Awyr Rhyngwladol Caerdydd) (IATA: CWL, ICAO: EGFF) is a major British airport located in the town of Rhoose, Vale of Glamorgan, approximately 12 miles (19 km) south-west of the Welsh capital, Cardiff, serving all of South and Mid Wales. ... Barry (Welsh: ) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. ... , Penarth (Welsh: pen head, + garth cliff or hill, or arth bear) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, lying on the north shore of the Severn estuary, and at the southern end of Cardiff Bay. ... Dinas Powys is a large village, a community and a refortified hill fort in the Vale of Glamorgan in Wales. ... Satellite view of the Bristol Channel Map of the Bristol Channel The Bristol Channel (Welsh: ) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from the West Country and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn (Afon Hafren) to that part of the North...

Cityscape

Cardiff Bay(modern day)
Cardiff Bay(modern day)

Roughly speaking, "Inner Cardiff" can be considered to consist of the following wards: Penylan, Plasnewydd, Gabalfa, Roath, Cathays, Adamsdown and Splott ward on the north and east of the city centre, and Butetown, Grangetown, Riverside and Canton to the south and west. The inner-city areas to the south of the A4161 road known as the "Southern Arc" are, with the exception of affluent and trendy Cardiff Bay, some of the poorest districts of Wales with low levels of economic activity and high ethnic minority populations. The proximity of these areas to Cardiff Bay have led some critics of the project to argue that the regeneration scheme has failed as it has done little to improve the economic prospects of local people, and may have worsened problems of exclusion and alienation. On the other hand Gabalfa, Plasnewydd and Cathays north of the 'arc' have very large student populations, and Pontcanna north of Riverside and alongside Canton is a favourite for young professionals and media types. Penylan which lies to the north east side of Roath Park is an affluent area popular with those with older children and the retired. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2400x1800, 1704 KB) Summary Cardiff Bay Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Cardiff Bay Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2400x1800, 1704 KB) Summary Cardiff Bay Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Cardiff Bay Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... Penylan is a district of Cardiff, the capital city of Wales. ... Plasnewydd electoral ward of Cardiff Plasnewydd is an electoral ward of Cardiff, Wales. ... Gabalfa is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Roath Brook flowing through Roath Park in the snow Roath (Welsh: Y Rhâth) is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... The Cathays electoral ward of Cardiff consists of some or all of the following areas: Cardiff city centre, Cathays, Cathays Park and Maindy in the the parliamentary constituency of Cardiff Central. ... Adamsdown is an area in the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Splott is an electoral ward and parish of Cardiff, Wales. ... Butetown electoral division of Cardiff The Docks is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Grangetown electoral ward of Cardiff Grangetown is an area in Cardiff, Wales. ... Riverside is an inner-city area of Cardiff, Wales. ... Canton (Welsh: Treganna) is an inner-city area of west Cardiff, Wales. ... The A4161 is a main road in Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... Penylan is a district of Cardiff, the capital city of Wales. ...


"Suburban Cardiff" can be broken down into three distinct areas. To the west lie Ely, Caerau and Fairwater which contain some of the largest housing estates in the United Kingdom. With the exception of some of the outlying privately built estates at Michaelston Super Ely and 1930s developments near Waun-Gron Road, this is an economically disadvantaged area with high numbers of unemployed households. Culverhouse Cross is a more affluent western area of the city. Radyr, Llandaff, Llandaff North, Whitchurch & Tongwynlais, Rhiwbina, Heath, Llanishen, Lisvane, and Cyncoed which lie in an arc from the north west to the north east of the centre can be considered the main middle class suburbs of the city. In particular, Cyncoed, Radyr and Lisvane contain some of the most expensive housing in Wales, and the last of these is likely to see considerable expansion in coming years with the council planning 4,000 houses in the area. Further to the east lie the wards of Pontprennau & Old St Mellons, Rumney, Pentwyn, Llanrumney and Trowbridge. The latter 3 are again largely of public housing stock, although new private housing is being built in Trowbridge in considerable number. Pontprennau is the newest 'suburb' of Cardiff, whilst Old St Mellons has a history going back to the Norman Conquest in the 11th century. Ely electoral ward of Cardiff Ely (Welsh Trelai tref town + Elai River Ely) is a suburb primarily dominated by council housing in western Cardiff, Wales. ... Caerau is a district of west Cardiff in south Wales. ... Fairwater electoral ward in Cardiff Fairwater (Welsh: Tyllgoed) is a village and district in north-west Cardiff. ... Culverhouse Cross Culverhouse Cross (Welsh: Croes Cwrlwys) is suburban district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Radyr and Morganstown electoral ward in Cardiff Radyr (strictly Radyr and Morganstown) is an outer suburb of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Llandaff electoral ward of Cardiff Llandaff (Welsh Llandaf llan church + Taf) is a district in the city of Cardiff, Wales, having been incorporated into the city in 1922, and is also the name of a diocese of the Church in Wales, covering the most populous area of south Wales. ... Llandaff North (Gogledd Ystum Tâf in Welsh) is a middle-class suburb located in the north of Cardiff, South Wales. ... Whitchurch (Welsh Yr Eglwys Newydd eglwys church + newydd new) is a suburb of Cardiff, Wales. ... Tongwynlais is a large village in South Wales. ... Rhiwbina electoral ward in Cardiff Image:Rhiwbina village. ... Heath (Welsh Y Mynydd Bychan small mound, or Y Waun gwaun heath) is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales, that is home to Cardiff Universitys College of Medicine, Biology, Life and Health Sciences, and the University Hospital of Wales (known colloquially as the Heath Hospital). ... Llanishen (Welsh Llanisien llan church + Isien Saint Isan) is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Lisvane (Welsh Llys-faen llys yard + maen stone) is a village in the county of Cardiff, Wales. ... Cyncoed electoral ward of Cardiff Cyncoed is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Radyr and Morganstown electoral ward in Cardiff Radyr (strictly Radyr and Morganstown) is an outer suburb of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Pentwyn electoral ward in cardiff Pentwyn is a district of Cardiff, Wales located north east of the city centre. ... Llanrumney (Welsh Llanrhymni: llan parish + Rhymney River) is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Trowbridge is a electoral ward of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Pontprennau is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... St Mellons (Welsh: ) is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ...


To the north west of the city lies a region that may be called "Rural Cardiff" containing the villages of St. Fagans, Creigiau, Pentyrch, Tongwynlais and Gwalod-y-garth. The last two are primarily "planned" communities developed from the mid 20th century and are popular with families looking for green space close to the city. St. Fagans, home to the Museum of Welsh Life, is protected from further development. The Main House at St Fagans 2004 The Gardens at St Fagans St Fagans (Welsh Sain Ffagan) is a village to the west of the city of Cardiff, Wales in Glamorgan county. ... Creigiau is a village near Cardiff, in Wales, U.K. It currently has about 1,000 houses, containing a population of approximately 2,400 people. ... Pentyrch is situated about seven miles north west of Cardiff the capital city of Wales. ... Tongwynlais is a large village in South Wales. ... The Manor House of St Fagans castle. ...


Climate

Climate chart for Cardiff
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
119
 
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91
 
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89
 
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65
 
13
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17
8
 
 
66
 
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18
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117
 
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128
 
9
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temperatures in °Cprecipitation totals in mm
source: Met Office

Cardiff has a temperate climate where summers and winters are generally mild, rather than extreme hot or cold. More specifically Cardiff has an oceanic climate (also called maritime climate). Oceanic climates are characterized by a narrower annual range of temperatures than are encountered in other places at a comparable latitude, and do not have the extremely dry summers of Mediterranean climates. The maritime climate is affected by the oceans, which help to sustain somewhat stable temperatures throughout the year. For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... World map showing the oceanic climate zones. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ...  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ...


Cardiff has a relatively dry climate compared to most of Wales,[4] with an average rainfall of 1,065 millimetres (41.9 in). It is also a relatively mild city,[5] with an average January temperature of 4.5 °C and an average July temperature of 16 °C[6]


Landmarks

Cardiff has many landmark buildings none more so than the Millennium Stadium, Pierhead Building and the Senedd, the Welsh parliament. However Cardiff is also famous for Cardiff Castle, St David's Hall, Llandaff Cathedral, the Wales Millennium Centre and Cathays Park (including municipal buildings modelled on those in New Delhi, such as Cardiff City Hall, the National Museum and Cardiff University). The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ... The Pierhead Building is a Grade 1 listed building of the National Assembly for Wales and is adjacent to the Senedd building and the Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff Bay, Wales. ... The National Assembly for Wales Building at night The Senedd in the daytime The Senedd (Welsh for Parliament or Senate) is the home of the National Assembly for Wales. ... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... St Davids Hall is a performing arts and conferencing venue situated in the heart of Cardiff city centre, Wales. ... Llandaff Cathedral is situated in the suburb of Llandaff in the city of Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and is the seat of the Bishop of Llandaff. ... The Wales Millennium Centre The Millennium Centre on its opening night The Wales Millennium Centre (Welsh: Canolfan Mileniwm Cymru) is a £106 million performing arts complex located on the Cardiff Bay waterfront. ... Cathays Park is a civic area in central Cardiff, Wales, consisting of a number of early 20th century buildings and a central park area. ... , This article is about the urban region that is the capital of India. ... City Hall is a civic building in Cathays Park, Cardiff, Wales. ... Entrance to the National Museum and Gallery, with its classical columns and dome above. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (600x800, 226 KB) Summary North side of Millenium Stadium in Cardiff. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1306 KB) Summary I took this photo myself. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1719 × 2431 pixels, file size: 620 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 3394 KB) Summary Llandaff Cathedral Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Llandaff Cathedral List of cathedrals in the United Kingdom Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1152x864, 363 KB) The Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixels, file size: 157 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) City Hall, Cathays Park, Cardiff. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1251x900, 92 KB) The National Museum and Gallery of Wales, Cathays Park, Cardiff. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 585 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cardiff University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to...

History

The name Cardiff may be an Anglicisation of the Welsh name "Caerdydd". There is uncertainty concerning the origin of "Caerdydd" — "Caer" means "fort" or "castle," but although "Dydd" means "Day" in modern Welsh, it is unclear what was meant in this context. Some believe that "Dydd" or "Diff" was a corruption of "Taff", the river on which Cardiff Castle stands, in which case "Cardiff" would mean "the fort on the river Taff" (in Welsh the T mutates to D). Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...

A map of Cardiff from 1946
A map of Cardiff from 1946

Others favour a link with Aulus Didius Gallus, as it is known that the Romans established a fort in Cardiff when he was governor of the nearby province, in which case Cardiff might mean "the Fort of Didius". A Norman castle still exists, within the site of the earlier Roman fort, but was substantially altered and extended during the Victorian period by John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute, and the architect William Burges. Original Roman work can, however, still be distinguished in the wall facings. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2000x1568, 462 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cardiff ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2000x1568, 462 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cardiff ... Aulus Didius Gallus was a Roman general and politician of the 1st century AD. He was consul in AD 36 and probably led the cavalry forces during Emperor Claudius invasion of Britain in AD 43. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute John Patrick Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute KT (12 September 1847 – 9 October 1900) is remembered chiefly for his links with the city of Cardiff, Wales, and particularly for the restoration of Cardiff Castle. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... William Burges William Burges (1827-1881) was an English architect and designer with influences which continue today. ...


There is a second castle north of the city, called Castell Coch (Welsh: "Red Castle"). The current castle is an elaborately decorated Victorian folly designed by Burges for the Marquess and built in the 1870s. However, the Victorian castle stands on the footings of a much older medieval castle possibly built by Ifor Bach, a regional baron with links to Cardiff Castle also. The exterior has become a popular location for film and television productions. Castell Coch. ... Ifor Bach (or, anglicised: Ivor Bach) was a twelfth century resident of Cardiff, Wales. ...


Situated on the narrowest part of the south Wales coastal plain, Cardiff had a crucial strategic importance in the wars between the Normans (who had occupied lowland Wales) and the Welsh who maintained their hold on the uplands. As a result Cardiff claims to have the largest concentration of castles of any city in the world. As well as Cardiff Castle and Castell Coch the remains of Castell Morgraig, Bishop's Castle, Y Twmpath, Ruperra Castle and Saint Fagans Castle are still in existence while Whitchurch Castle and King's Castle have disappeared under later developments.[citation needed] This article describes the fortified buildings. ... Bishops Castle is a small market town in Shropshire, England, and formerly its smallest borough. ... A twmpath is a Welsh barn dance, very similar in spirit to a ceilidh or a fest-noz. ... Ruperra Castle is situated in the county borough of Caerphilly in South East Wales. ... The Manor House of St Fagans castle. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Cardiff_Castle_keep. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1009 KB) Summary Castell Cosh front view, late January around midday. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 658 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2069 × 1886 pixels, file size: 885 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Language

Clock tower of Cardiff City Hall
Clock tower of Cardiff City Hall

Cardiff has a chequered linguistic history with Welsh, English, Latin and Norse dominating at different times. Although it was the Romans who established the "castle on the Taff" it was the Vikings who first began developing the maritime trade from which the town (later to become a city) was to derive its prosperity. The Vikings – who controlled the Bristol Channel – used Cardiff as a raiding base, a port and a trading post. Many street-names in Cardiff are of Viking origin including Dumballs Road and the oldest street in the city, Womanby Street. Womanby Street is a corruption of the original Norse name Humandaby Street. It is most probable that Welsh was the majority language from the 13th century until the city's explosive growth in Victorian times. As late as 1850 five of the twelve Anglican churches within the current city boundaries conducted their services exclusively in Welsh, while only two worshipped exclusively in English. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1168x1752, 983 KB) Description: Tower in Cardiff, Wales, UK Source: Photo taken by Olivier Aumage Date: Created 08. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1168x1752, 983 KB) Description: Tower in Cardiff, Wales, UK Source: Photo taken by Olivier Aumage Date: Created 08. ...


A substantial Irish population settled in Cardiff during the 19th century. They were drawn to Cardiff by the work available on major building and engineering projects in the docks and the city itself. The intermingling of the Irish, together with migrants from the West Country, the Midlands and rural Wales is credited with having formed the distinctive flat-vowelled "Cardiff accent" (Roots to Cardiff exhibition, 2007). By 1891 the percentage of Welsh speakers had dropped to 27.9% and only Lisvane, Llanedyrn and Creigiau remained as majority Welsh-speaking communities. The Welsh language became grouped around a small cluster of chapels and churches, the most notable of which is Tabernacl in the city centre, one of four UK churches chosen to hold official services to commemorate the new millennium. Following the establishment of the city's first Welsh School (Ysgol Gymraeg Bryntaf) in the 1950s, Welsh has slowly regained some ground.


Aided by Welsh-medium education and migration from other parts of Wales, the number of Welsh speakers in Cardiff rose by 14,451 between 1991 and 2001; Welsh is now spoken by 11% of Cardiffians. The highest percentage of Welsh speakers is in Creigiau, where over 20% of the population speak the language.


Capital city status

King Edward VII granted Cardiff city status on 28 October 1905. It was then proclaimed capital city of Wales on 20 December 1955, by a Written Reply by the Home Secretary Gwilym Lloyd George. Caernarfon had also vied for this title.[7] Cardiff therefore celebrated two important anniversaries in 2005. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... Gwilym Lloyd George, 1st Viscount Tenby, (4 December 1894 - 1967) was a British politician and cabinet minister. ... Caernarfon (the original Welsh spelling is now almost always used in preference to the anglicised forms, Caernarvon or Carnarvon) is a royal town in north-west Wales. ... An anniversary (from the Latin anniversarius, from the words for year and to turn, meaning (re)turning yearly; known in English since c. ...


The city is county town of Glamorgan, although this role has diminished since council reorganisation in 1974 paired Cardiff and the Vale of Glamorgan together as the new county of South Glamorgan. Further local government restructuring in 1996 resulted in Cardiff city's district council becoming a unitary authority. A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ... South Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... In 1974 Wales was divided for local government purposes into districts. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ...


On 1 March 2004, Cardiff was granted Fairtrade City status. is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fairtrade Town is a status awarded by the Fairtrade Foundation in the United Kingdom and Channel Islands, describing an area which is committed to the promotion of Fairtrade-labelled goods. ...


Demographics

Year Population of Cardiff
1801 6,342
1851 26,630
1861 48,965
1871 71,301
1881 93,637
1891 142,114
1901 172,629
1911 209,804
1921 227,753
1931 247,270
1941 257,112
1951 267,356
1961 278,552
1971 290,227
1981 274,500
1991 272,557
2001 305,353
2006 317,500*
source: Vision of Britain
except * estimated from the
Office for National Statistics

Cardiff's population is a growing one, with a likely population of roughly 317,500 in 2006 representing an increase of over 10,000 since the 2001 Census figure of 305,353, which makes it the largest city in Wales. Cardiff Council have predicted a growth of 16,000 in the decade following 2011, which, extrapolating current growth rates until that date would give a population of the city of 349,000 in 2021. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... This article is about the country. ... Cardiff Council (Welsh: ) is the governing body for Cardiff, one of the Principal Areas of Wales. ...


The ethnic make-up of Cardiff's population, at the time of the 2001 census was: 91.6% white, 2% mixed race, 4% South Asian, 1.3% Black, 1.2% Other ethnic origin.


The unoffical Cardiff Metropolitian Area(includes all of South East Wales) has a population of about 1,695,500.


Official estimates derived from the census are controversial. The city council has published two articles that argue the 2001 census seriously under reports the population of Cardiff and, in particular, the ethnic minority population of some inner city areas. If this work is given credence, a current official population of approximately 340,000 with up to 11% ethnic minority would be preferred.[10] [11]


Religion

Since 1922 Cardiff has included the suburban cathedral 'village' of Llandaff, whose bishop is currently Archbishop of Wales. There is also a Roman Catholic cathedral in the city. Since 1916 Cardiff has been the seat of a Catholic archbishop, but there appears to have been a fall in the estimated Catholic and Jewish populations of the city (two synagogues, one in Cyncoed and one in Moira Terrace, as opposed to at least three in the mid-20th century). There are a significant number of Nonconformist chapels, an early 20th century Greek Orthodox church and about ten mosques. Llandaff electoral ward of Cardiff Llandaff (Welsh Llandaf llan church + Taf) is a district in the city of Cardiff, Wales, having been incorporated into the city in 1922, and is also the name of a diocese of the Church in Wales, covering the most populous area of south Wales. ... The Province of Wales in the Anglican Communion was created in 1920, as the Church in Wales, independent from the Church of England (of which the four Welsh dioceses had previously been part). ... Cardiff Cathedral (also known as Cardiff Metropolitan Cathedral of St David and St Davids Cathedral Cardiff) is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Cardiff, Wales, which serves as the National Cathedral for Wales. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination...


In the 2001 census 66.9% of the city's population described themselves as Christian, below the Welsh and UK average, while 3.7% described themselves as Muslim, significantly above the Welsh average but in line with the UK average. The proportion of people declaring themselves to be Hindu, Sikh and Jewish were all considerably higher than the Welsh averages, but less than the UK figures. 18.8% stated they had no religion, while 8.6% did not state a religion. Paganism is also enjoying a rebirth in Wales, though followers remain minute in number. Pagan and heathen redirect here. ...


Economy

As the capital city of Wales, Cardiff is the main engine of growth in the Welsh economy and conveys economic, social and cultural benefits across the wider region. The economy of Cardiff and adjacent areas makes up nearly 20% of Welsh GDP and 40% of the city’s workforce are daily in-commuters from the surrounding south Wales area.

Cardiff Central Market on St Mary Street in the city centre
Cardiff Central Market on St Mary Street in the city centre

Cardiff is increasingly benefiting from a raised international profile and has enjoyed significant growth over the last decade or more, spearheaded by the redevelopment of Cardiff Bay. Widely regarded as one of the United Kingdom’s most successful regeneration projects, the redevelopment of Cardiff Bay has involved the revitalisation of 1,100 hectares of decaying and derelict land in the city’s former dockland area with residential, retail, commercial and leisure developments. A major feature of the regeneration project has been the £220 million Cardiff Bay Barrage, which has created Europe’s largest city centre waterfront. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 3336 KB) Summary Cardiff indoor market Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Cardiff Cardiff city centre Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 3336 KB) Summary Cardiff indoor market Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Cardiff Cardiff city centre Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...


Total employment in Cardiff rose from 149,000 in 1991 to 173,200 in 2001 and between 2000 and 2001 employment levels in the city grew by 3% – more than double the rate across Great Britain (1.3%). Following the decline of the city’s heavy industry in the latter part of the 20th century, the economy of Cardiff is now dominated by the service sector (see table of employment by industry below) with just 9% of employees – 15,650 individuals – engaged in manufacturing activities.


Public administration, education and health is the largest sector in Cardiff, providing employment for 32% of the city’s workforce. Cardiff is the main financial and business services centre in Wales and as such, the sector provides employment for 20% of the city’s workforce.


One in five employees (20.4%) in Cardiff are based in the distribution, hotels and restaurants sector, highlighting the growing retail and tourism industries in the city. Cardiff has a thriving retail and shopping centre, and the city was named as the 6th best shopping location in the UK in the 2003 Experian Retail Ranking, falling to 8th place in 2004. However a major £675 million, regeneration programme for Cardiff's St. David's Centre will create the UK's largest city centre shopping centre.[citation needed] The St. ...


Industry

Cardiff Barrage Entrance locks
Cardiff Barrage Entrance locks

Cardiff was originally a small town - much smaller than Swansea and Merthyr Tydfil. What changed it was the demand for iron, brought to the sea by packhorse from Merthyr. The Ironmasters, the proprietors of the smelters in Dowlais and Merthyr, wanted to reduce the cost of carrying iron by road to ships berthed in the estuary of the River Taff at Cardiff. They sought permission of Parliament to build a 25-mile long canal from Merthyr (510 feet above sea-level) to the Taff Estuary at Cardiff. Image File history File linksMetadata Cardiff_Barrage_Entrance. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cardiff_Barrage_Entrance. ... A packhorse, pack horse or pack pony is a horse or pony used for carrying goods in sidebags or panniers. ... The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ...


Work on building the Glamorganshire Canal began in 1790, took eight years and involved installing 50 locks. The Cardiff Sea Lock, which enabled barges to unload iron into sea-going ships, was built at Harrowby Street (Harrowby - a Viking place-name - had been the original Norse trading post in Cardiff). Eventually the Taff Vale Railway replaced the canal barges and massive marshalling yards sprang up as new docks were developed in Cardiff - all prompted by the soaring world-wide demand for south Wales coal. The Glamorganshire Canal was a canal in Glamorgan, South Wales, UK, running from Merthyr Tydfil to Cardiff. ... The Taff Vale Railway (TVR) is a railway in Glamorgan, South Wales, and is one of the oldest in Wales. ...


Cardiff's port, known as Tiger Bay, became the busiest port in the world and - for some time - the world's most important coal port. Indeed, Cardiff's Coal Exchange was reputedly the first host to a business deal for a £million pounds Sterling. For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... Tiger Bay is the former dock area of Cardiff. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The Coal Exchange was a market floor for trading in coal, and is now a venue for staged events, in Cardiff, Wales as well as containing a number of offices. ... GBP redirects here. ...


The Tiger Bay area also housed one of the UK's earliest immigrant communities. After a long period of neglect as Cardiff Bay, it is now being regenerated as a popular area for arts, entertainment and nightlife. Much of the growth has been thanks to the building of the Cardiff Barrage. Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... Urban regeneration (also called urban renewal in American English) is a movement in urban planning that reached its peak in the United States from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. ... The Cardiff Barrage lies across the mouth of Cardiff Bay, Wales between Queen Alexandra Dock and Penarth Head. ...


Present day

Today, Cardiff is the principal finance and business services centre in Wales, and as such there is a strong representation of finance and business services in the local economy. In December 2003, 33,850 individuals were employed in the sector - higher than the proportion across both Wales (9.6%) and Great Britain (15.4%). Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Services are: plural of service Tertiary sector of industry IRC services Web services the name of a first-class cricket team in India This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the country. ...


Cru Investment Management are the only known investment management firm to be based in Wales - their head office is based within Cardiff. Legal & General, Admiral Insurance, HBOS, Zurich, ING Direct, The AA, Principality Building Society, 118118, British Gas, Brains, SWALEC Energy and BT (based in BT Tower all operate large contact centres in the city, many based in Cardiff's skyscrapers such as Capital Tower and Brunel House. Other major employers include NHS Wales and the National Assembly for Wales. Legal & General Group Plc is a British based financial services company that provides life, health and other insurance, as well as pensions and investments. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Group headquarters on The Mound, Edinburgh HBOS Office at Trinity Road, Halifax HBOS plc (LSE: HBOS) is a banking and insurance group in the United Kingdom, the holding company for Bank of Scotland plc, which operates the Bank of Scotland and Halifax brands; HBOS Australia, owner of BankWest; and HBOS... Zurich Financial Services Group is a major financial services group based in Zurich, Switzerland. ... ING Direct is a branchless direct bank with operations in Austria, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States. ... The Automobile Association (The AA) is a former British motoring association that became a private limited company in 1999, currently owned by two large private equity firms. ... Principality is a Welsh building society based in Cardiff, Wales. ... 118 118 is a telephone number used by two major directory enquiries providers: 118 118 (UK), owned by The Number UK Ltd 118 118 (Sweden), owned by Eniro AB Category: ... Centrica plc (LSE: CNA) is a large multinational company, based in the UK but also with interests in North America and Europe. ... Founded in 1882, SA Brain & Company Ltd, popularly known as Brains, is a brewery in Wales that produces a number of traditional ales in the heart of Cardiff. ... SWALEC (South Wales Electricity) was an electricity supply and distribution company which was bought out in 1996 for £872m following the de-regulation of the electricity supply industry in the UK. The purchaser, newly privatised company Welsh Water, rebranded itself as Hyder (defunct company). ... BT may stand for: Baal teshuvah, a Jew who became Orthodox (female version: Baalat teshuvah) BT tank, any of a series of Soviet military tanks Bacillus thuringiensis, a bacterium which forms Bt toxins Banjo-Tooie, a video game for the Nintendo 64 Baronet, a title in the British honours... The BT Tower is a tall cylindrical building in London, England. ... Capital Tower located in Cardiff, South Wales, otherwise known as Pearl House, is Wales and Cardiffs second tallest structure, standing at 80 metres (262 feet)[1] (second to the towers at the Millennium Stadium). ... The logo of NHS Wales NHS Wales is the name for the National Health Services activities in Wales. ... Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ...


Cardiff is home to the Welsh media. BBC Wales, S4C and ITV Wales have their studios in the city and the UK's largest film, TV & multimedia sector outside London. Employment in the sector has grown significantly in recent years, and currently provides employment for 2.1% of the city's workforce - higher than the level across Wales (1.1%) and marginally lower than that across Great Britain as a whole (2.2%). BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... S4C (Sianel Pedwar Cymru, which is Welsh for Channel Four Wales) is a television channel in Wales. ... ITV Wales & West Ltd (formally and more commonly known as HTV) is the ITV contractor for Wales and the West of England[1]. It is owned by ITV plc. ...


Retail also plays a strong role in the city's employment, with it being crowned the 8th best place to shop in the UK according to recent surveys, and this ranking is likely to rise into the top 5 once the St. David's 2 shopping development is completed. The majority of Cardiff's shopping portfolio is in the city centre around Queen Street and St. Mary's Street. There are also numerous suburban retail parks, serving the city. Drawing of a self-service store. ...


The city is also host to S A Brain, a brewery with premises in Cardiff since 1882. The current brewery is located next to Central Station. Founded in 1882, Brains is a brewery in South Wales that produces a number of ales according to time honoured methods in the heart of Cardiff. ... The entrance of a brewery. ... Cardiff Central railway station (Welsh: Caerdydd Canolog) is a major British railway station in Cardiff. ...


In 2003 Cardiff combined with the Vale of Glamorgan had a GDP of £8.335 billion GBP. The GDP per head was £18,794, making the city more affluent than the UK as a whole, at 116% of the UK average or 146% of the Welsh average.[8] GBP redirects here. ...

Present day Cardiff looking westward
Present day Cardiff looking westward
Trend of regional gross value added of Cardiff and the Vale at current basic prices [12]. Figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.
Year Regional Gross Value Added Agriculture Industry Services
1995 4,797 11 1,121 3,666
2000 6,584 11 1,260 5,313
2003 8,335 11 1,410 6,913

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 254 pixelsFull resolution (5736 × 1824 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 254 pixelsFull resolution (5736 × 1824 pixel, file size: 3. ...

Telecommunications

029 is the telephone dialling code for Cardiff. However it is vastly misconceived (in the city but on a larger scale outside of the city) to be 02920 because initially all numbers began with 20. Currently all newly issued numbers begin with 21.


The code includes the neighbouring towns on Penarth, Dinas Powys and Caerphilly. , Penarth (Welsh: pen head, + garth cliff or hill, or arth bear) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, lying on the north shore of the Severn estuary, and at the southern end of Cardiff Bay. ... Dinas Powys is a large village, a community and a refortified hill fort in the Vale of Glamorgan in Wales. ... Liam is a legend and lives in trecenydd Caerphilly (Welsh: Caerffili) is a town in South Wales, located at the bottom of the Rhymney Valley, with a population of approximately 31,000. ...


The city's dialling code changed on 22 April 2000 from 01222 to 029 in the Big Number Change along with London, Coventry, Portsmouth, Southampton and Northern Ireland in response to the rapid late 1990s growth of telecommunications and impending exhaustion of numbers. This measure increased the numbers of digits in the subscriber telephone number from 6 to 8, therefore vastly increasing the possible telephone numbers available. Simply changing from 01222 to 02920 would not have changed anything. is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Big Number Change was the name given to the update of dialling codes in the U.K. in response to the rapid late 1990s growth of telecommunications and impending exhaustion of numbers. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Ofcom has allocated the range of telephone numbers from (029) 2018 0000 to (029) 2018 0999 to be used for drama purposes in television and radio. These numbers will not be allocated to telephone companies in the foreseeable future.[9] Ofcom is a regulator for communication industries in the United Kingdom. ...


Culture

See List of cultural venues in Cardiff

Cardiff has a strong and varied culture, with sites varying from the historical Cardiff Castle and out of town Castell Coch to the more modern Wales Millennium Centre and Cardiff Bay which have raised the city's cultural profile considerably as a major tourist destination in the UK. It is also one of the UK's principal tourist destinations after London and Edinburgh, attracting over 11 million tourists in 2005. Cardiff was a finalist in the European Capital of Culture 2008. This is a list of cultural venues in the City of Cardiff, Wales. ... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... Castell Coch. ... The Wales Millennium Centre The Millennium Centre on its opening night The Wales Millennium Centre (Welsh: Canolfan Mileniwm Cymru) is a £106 million performing arts complex located on the Cardiff Bay waterfront. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ...


Attractions

Cardiff is home to Cardiff Castle, the National Assembly for Wales, St. David's Hall, the National Museum and Gallery, and Cathays Park (including municipal buildings modelled on those in New Delhi), and the Cardiff Metropolitan Cathedral. The Welsh National Opera moved into the Wales Millennium Centre in November 2004. The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ... The National Museum and Gallery of Wales (Welsh: Amgueddfa ac Oriel Genedlaethol Cymru) is a museum and art gallery in Cardiff, Wales. ... Cathays Park is a civic area in central Cardiff, Wales, consisting of a number of early 20th century buildings and a central park area. ... , This article is about the urban region that is the capital of India. ... The Canolfan Mileniwm Cymru or Wales Millenium Centre, a new performing arts centre which opended in 2004, is the home of the Welsh National Opera (WNO), a touring operatic company founded in Cardiff in 1943. ... The Wales Millennium Centre The Millennium Centre on its opening night The Wales Millennium Centre (Welsh: Canolfan Mileniwm Cymru) is a £106 million performing arts complex located on the Cardiff Bay waterfront. ...


Cardiff Castle is a major tourist attraction in the city and is situated in the heart of the city centre, near to the main shopping area of Queen Street and St. Mary's Street. The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ...


Other major tourist attractions are the Cardiff Bay regeneration sites which include the recently opened Wales Millennium Centre and the National Assembly for Wales and many other cultural and sites of interest including the Cardiff Bay Barrage and the famous Coal Exchange. The New Theatre was founded in 1906 and completely refurbished in the 1980s. Until the opening of the Wales Millennium Centre in 2004, it was the premier venue in Wales for touring theatre and dance companies, and is located in the city centre. Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ... Cardiff Barrage Entrance locks The Cardiff Bay Barrage lies across the mouth of Cardiff Bay, Wales between Queen Alexandra Dock and Penarth Head. ... The Coal Exchange was a market floor for trading in coal, and is now a venue for staged events, in Cardiff, Wales as well as containing a number of offices. ... The New Theatre (Welsh: Theatr Newydd although it usually uses its English name as a title) is one of the principal theatres in Cardiff, Wales. ...


Other venues which are popular for gigs and sporting events include Cardiff International Arena, St David's Hall and the Millennium Stadium. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... St Davids Hall is a performing arts and conferencing venue situated in the heart of Cardiff city centre, Wales. ... The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ...

Cardiff City Hall is situated among Cathays Park's numerous green spaces, which are popular with students on sunny days

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 178 pixelsFull resolution (5455 × 1215 pixel, file size: 2. ...

Festivals

The Big Weekend Festival, is held annually in late July/August in the city centre and is the place for many theme park events, rides and regularly attracts annually over 200,000 visitors. The annual Cardiff Festival claims to be the UK's largest free outdoor festival and plays host to a range of different festivals including the Children's Festival that takes place in the grounds of Cardiff Castle. Radio 1s Big Weekend (sometimes referred to as One Big Weekend) is a music festival run by BBC Radio 1. ... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ...


Cardiff hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1883, 1899, 1938, 1960 and 1978, and is set to host it again in 2008. Cardiff is unique in Wales in having two permanent stone circles used by the Gorsedd of Bards during Eisteddfodau. The original circle stands in Gorsedd Gardens in front of the National Museum while its 1978 replacement is situated in Bute Park. The Eisteddfod (literally sitting) is a Welsh festival of literature, music, and song. ... While not unique to Britain, stone circles are a very British type of monument. ... A bard is a poet and singer, with the particular meaning differing for various countries and epochs. ... A national museum is a museum maintained by a nation. ... Bute Park in Cardiff, Wales, is an extensive area of mature parkland easily accessible from the city centre. ...


Every other year, Cardiff plays host to the BBC Cardiff Singer of the World competition, a world renowned event on the opera calendar. The Cardiff Singer of the World Competition (also the BBC Singer of the World in Cardiff Competition in 2003) is a singing competition held every two years. ...


Cardiff Philatelic Society is the oldest Philatelic Society in Wales. It was founded in 1899. Early postcards of Cardiff can be seen on the website Close examination of the Penny Red, left, reveals a 148 in the margin, indicating that it was printed with plate #148. ...


The city now hosts The Cardiff Design Festival and began showcasing the best of Welsh design during the summer of 2005. Since then the festival has grown into a diverse range of designers exhibiting their wares at the 2006 portable exhibition. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Parks

Cardiff's centre is a particularly green one with Bute Park, formerly the castle grounds, extending northwards from the top of one of Cardiff's main shopping street (Queen Street); when combined with the adjacent Llandaff Fields to the north west it produces a massive open space skirting the River Taff. The popular name of Taffy, for the Welshman abroad has its origins in the name of the river. Other popular parks include Roath Park in the north, donated to the city by the 3rd Marquess of Bute in 1887 and which includes a very popular boating lake; Victoria Park, Cardiff's first official park; and Thompson's Park, formerly home to an aviary removed in the 1970s. Bute Park in Cardiff, Wales, is an extensive area of mature parkland easily accessible from the city centre. ... The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ... Taffy can refer to any of the following: Taffy is Lindays doggy. ... Roath Park (Welsh: Parc y Rhath) Cardiff, Wales, is Cardiffs most popular park which still retains a classic Victorian atmosphere and boasts a wide variety of facilities. ... John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute John Patrick Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute KT (12 September 1847 – 9 October 1900) is remembered chiefly for his links with the city of Cardiff, Wales, and particularly for the restoration of Cardiff Castle. ... Victoria Park is a public park in the Canton district of Cardiff in south Wales at [[Cowbridge Road West ]]. As its name sugests, it is a traditional Victorian park and has kept much of its charm. ... An aviary is a large enclosure for confining birds. ...


It is possible to cycle from Cardiff to Brecon almost completely off-road on the Taff Trail, a cycle route which follows the River Taff and many of the old disused railways of the Glamorganshire valleys. The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... Mile post at Quakers Yard The Taff Trail is a popular walking and cycle path that runs for 55 miles between Cardiff Bay and Brecon in Wales. ... The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ...


In 2006 Cardiff won the prestigious Entente Floral award for large cities due to the beauty of its parks and floral displays.

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Roath Park (Welsh: Parc y Rhath) Cardiff, Wales, is Cardiffs most popular park which still retains a classic Victorian atmosphere and boasts a wide variety of facilities. ...

Music and nightlife

Main article: Cardiff music scene

The Cardiff music scene is established and wide-ranging. It is the home to the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Welsh National Opera. It has produced several leading acts itself and, as a capital city, has acted as a springboard for numerous Welsh bands to go and become famous both nationally and internationally. These include Charlotte Church, The Automatic, Catatonia, Super Furry Animals, Jem, Funeral for a Friend, Lostprophets, Bullet for My Valentine, Stereophonics, Manic Street Preachers, The Oppressed, Kids In Glass Houses, Los Campesinos, The Hot Puppies, Pagan Wanderer Lu, Budgie, and Shakin' Stevens among others. This page is about the popular music scene in Cardiff, Wales, UK. Cardiff boasts a thriving local music scene. ... The BBC National Orchestra of Wales is the main full scale professional orchestra in Wales. ... The Canolfan Mileniwm Cymru or Wales Millenium Centre, a new performing arts centre which opended in 2004, is the home of the Welsh National Opera (WNO), a touring operatic company founded in Cardiff in 1943. ... Charlotte Church (born Charlotte Maria Reed on February 21, 1986) is a Welsh singer and television presenter who rose to international fame in childhood as a popular classical singer with a precociously mature dramatic operatic voice, in particular in its tonal qualities. ... The Automatic otherwise known as The Automatic Automatic, in the U.S. and Canada[1][2], are a band who formed in Cowbridge, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales but are now based in Cardiff. ... Catatonia were a popular music band from Wales who gained a national following in the United Kingdom in the mid-late 1990s. ... Super Furry Animals (also known as SFA, the Furries and the Super Furries) are a Welsh rock band, with leanings towards psychedelic rock and electronic experimentation. ... Jem may refer to: a television animated series which aired in the mid-1980s, see Jem (animated) the musician Jem (Jemma Griffiths). ... For the Elton John song, see Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding. ... Lostprophets (IPA: ) are a Welsh alternative metal band formed in 1997. ... Bullet For My Valentine is a four person Metalcore band from Bridgend, South Wales. ... Stereophonics are a rock band from Wales with members Kelly Jones, Richard Jones (no relation to Kelly) and Javier Weyler. ... Manic Street Preachers (often known colloquially as The Manics) are a Welsh rock band often associated with the Britpop scene, who gained mainstream popularity in the UK in the late 1990s. ... The Oppressed is a Welsh anti-fascist Oi! band that was formed in 1981 in Cardiff. ... Kids in Glass Houses are a five-piece powerpop rock band from Cardiff, the capital of Wales. ... Los Campesinos! are a seven piece indie pop band from Cardiff, Wales. ... The Hot Puppies are a Welsh band from Aberystwyth, now based in Cardiff, signed to Fierce Panda Records. ... Pagan Wanderer Lu is a one-man indie/electronica or Indietronica band originally formed in Aberystwyth but now based in Cardiff. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shakin Stevens also known as Shaky (born Michael Barratt, 4 March 1948, in Ely, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, Wales) is a Welsh rock and roll singer, who has the distinction of being the top selling male UK singles artist of the 1980s. ...


Cardiff has a strong nightlife, well established in the UK, let alone Wales, and is home to many bars, pubs and clubs. Most clubs and bars are situated in the city centre, especially St. Mary's Street, and more recently Cardiff Bay has built up a strong night scene, with many modern bars & restaurants. The Brewery Quarter on St. Mary's Street is a recently developed venue for bars and restaurant with a central courtyard. Charles Street is also a popular part of the city.


Shopping

Cardiff city centre has three main shopping arcades; St. David's Centre, Queen's Arcade and the Capitol Centre. The current expansion of St. David's Centre as part of the St. David's 2 project is allowing a huge piece of land between The Hayes and Charles Street to be demolished and redeveloped, bringing around 200 shops, flats and a John Lewis department store to the city. As well as these modern shopping arcades, the city is still home to many Victorian shopping centres, such as High Street Arcade, Castle Arcade, Wyndham Arcade, Royal Arcade and Morgan Arcade. The St. ... Queens Arcade (Welsh: Arced y Frenhinol) is a shopping centre in Cardiff, opened April 28 1994. ... Capitol Centre is an indoor shopping centre in the city of Cardiff, Wales. ...


There are two main shopping streets in the city centre. Queen Street is home to the main chain stores such as Topshop, Topman, Boots, Gap, Dorothy Perkins, Primark, and Zara to name a few. The second main street, St. Mary Street, is home to Wales' oldest and largest department store, Howells. It is also home to smaller independent stores, but is mainly a beverage only high street. Topshop is a chain of clothing stores situated throughout the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and over 30 other countries. ... Topshop is a clothing retailer in the United Kingdom. ... Boots is the name of at least five different albums and singles: Boots by Nancy Sinatra (1966) Boots by Mighty Gabby (1984) Boots by Condemned Eighty Four (2001) Boots by KMFDM (2002) Boots by Noe Venable (2003) It is also the name of a large chain of chemists in the... For other uses, see Gap. ... A branch of Dorothy Perkins on Buchanan Street in Glasgow Dorothy Perkins is a large British womens clothing retailer, active mostly in the United Kingdom. ... Penneys redirects here. ... Zara may refer to: // Zara is the Venetian, Austrian and Italian name of the Adriatic port city of Zadar (official 13th-20th century), former capital of Dalmatia, in Croatia Zara (Turkish district), a district in the Turkish province of Sivas Zara, Eritrea, a city in central-western Eritrea. ... William Dean Howells (March 1, 1837 - May 11, 1920) was an American realist author. ...


Cardiff has a number of markets: these include the vast Victorian indoor Cardiff Market, and a smaller 'fruit & veg' style St. David's Market on Barrack Lane which will be improved with the coming of St. David's 2. In recent years the Sunday Riverside Market situated on the west bank of the Taff opposite the Millennium Stadium has gone from strength to strength with its blend of local and organic farmers' produce appealing to a more environmentally conscious population.


Several out-of-town retail parks exist, such as Newport Road, Culverhouse Cross, Cardiff Gate and Cardiff Bay.


There have been a number of issues relating to city centre shopping, most recently the cost of parking in the city centre, along with the banning of private cars on St. Mary's Street. Both have been heavily criticised by some sectors of the public and retailers.


Media

Cardiff is the base for a number of national television broadcasters including BBC Wales, ITV1 Wales, S4C, and Capital TV - Cardiff's own local television service. BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... ITV Wales & West Ltd (formally and more commonly known as HTV) is the ITV contractor for Wales and the West of England[1]. It is owned by ITV plc. ... S4C (Sianel Pedwar Cymru, which is Welsh for Channel Four Wales) is a television channel in Wales. ...


The main local newspaper, the South Wales Echo and the national paper the Western Mail are based in the Western Mail and Echo building in the city centre. Capital Times, Cardiff Post and the South Wales edition of Metro are also based and distributed in the city. There are also a number of magazines based in the city including Jazz UK, Buzz magazine, Primary Times and a monthly Welsh language paper called Y Dinesydd (The Citizen). The South Wales Echo is the top-selling evening newspaper in Wales. ... The Western Mail is a daily red-top tabloid newspaper published by Western Mail and Echo Ltd in Cardiff, Wales. ... Cover for an issue of the Metro newspaper, October 25th 2004. ... Buzz is a free, monthly entertainment guide and magazine printed and distributed in South Wales. ... Primary Times is a free family magazine which is distributed to schools across the UK. The magazine aims to help families decide what to do during the school holidays. ... Y Dinesydd is a monthly, local Welsh-medium newspaper for Cardiff. ...


Red Dragon FM is the main radio station serving South Wales, it is based in the Red Dragon Centre.[10] A number of other radio stations also serve and are based in Cardiff including Real Radio, BBC Radio Wales and BBC Radio Cymru. Xfm has announced that it will start broadcasting from Cardiff in November 2007. Red Dragon FM is the commercial radio station serving the Cardiff and Newport areas. ... Real Radio is a brand of regional radio stations in the United Kingdom owned by GMG Radio. ... BBC Radio Wales is the BBCs national radio station broadcasting to Wales in the English language. ... BBC Radio Cymru is BBC Wales Welsh language radio station, broadcasting throughout Wales on FM since 1979. ... Xfm South Wales is a regional radio station broadcasting alternative music to the South Wales area and is to launch in November 2007. ...


Cardiff in Sci-fi and Fantasy

Cardiff has been repeatedly mentioned in the revival (2005-) of the BBC TV programme Doctor Who, the series having been chiefly filmed in and around the city (it is made for the BBC network by BBC Wales). The 2006 spin-off show, Torchwood, is also filmed in Cardiff and set in the real-life modern city (as were two episodes of Doctor Who: "Boom Town" and Briefly in "Utopia" ). It has been claimed that 1 out of 5 tourists to Cardiff choose to visit after seeing it on TV (The Sun, Monday 17 April 2006). In these two series, it is claimed there is a rift in time and space that transects Cardiff. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television series. ... BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... Boom Town is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on June 4, 2005. ... Utopia is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Cardiff is also the birthplace of Dalek creator Terry Nation and popular children's author Roald Dahl. Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ...


Cardiff was referenced by Tom Jones in the Tim Burton film Mars Attacks and was the setting for several scenes in the film Frankenstein meets the Wolf Man. For other uses, see Tom Jones (disambiguation). ... Mars Attacks is a highly popular lurid science fiction trading card series. ...


Sports

The city has a regional rugby union team, the Cardiff Blues, who play in the Magners League at their Cardiff Arms Park stadium. Cardiff also has several amateur rugby clubs too. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 587 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): EDF Energy Cup Llanelli Scarlets Millennium Stadium ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 587 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): EDF Energy Cup Llanelli Scarlets Millennium Stadium ... Official website www. ... Official website www. ... The Powergen Cup (centre) seen in the London Irish clubhouse at Sunbury in 2002. ... The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official website www. ... The Celtic League (also known as the Magners League for sponsorship reasons) is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. ... Cardiff Arms Park is a stadium complex situated in the centre of Cardiff, Wales. ...


Cardiff has one main professional football club, Cardiff City F.C. who currently play in the English Coca-Cola Championship and are also known locally as the Bluebirds. Their current stadium is Ninian Park located to the south of the city, however a new stadium is currently under construction in nearby Leckwith, which is due to be opened in 2009, and will be shared with the Cardiff Blues. Cardiff has numerous smaller clubs such as Grange Harlequins A.F.C. UWIC and Ely Rangers A.F.C. who all play in the Welsh Football System. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Cardiff City Association Football Club (Welsh: Clwb Pêl-droed Dinas Caerdydd) are a football team based in Cardiff, and are one of the three Welsh clubs competing in the Football League, currently playing in the Football League Championship. ... Ninian Park is a football stadium in Cardiff, Wales. ... The New Cardiff City stadium is a proposed development of a 30,000 seater ground, intended to be the new home of Cardiff City F.C. // The new stadium will be built on the site of the nearby Leckwith Athletics Stadium. ... Official website www. ... Cardiff Grange Quins (Grange Harlequins AFC) is a Welsh football team which plays in the Welsh Premier League. ... University situated in Cardiff specialising in sport, business and art. ... Ely Rangers Association Football Club are a Welsh association football team founded in 1965. ... The Welsh football league system (or pyramid) is a series of football leagues with regular promotion and relegation between them. ...


Cardiff also has a county cricket side, Glamorgan CCC, who play at the city centre's Sophia Gardens ground, and will undergo a multi-million pound improvement in time to host a Test Match as part of The Ashes in 2009. Cardiff also plays host to a rugby league side, Cardiff Demons and a professional ice-hockey team, the Cardiff Devils. The Cardiff Marathon takes place in the city every October and attracts several thousand participants and spectators. Glamorgan County Cricket Club was founded in 1888 and is a county cricket club. ... An venue within Cardiff, home to the Glamorgan County Cricket Club and proposed future home of the Cardiff Devils. ... For the womens version of the game, see Womens Test cricket. ... For other uses, see The Ashes (disambiguation). ... Rugby league football (usually shortened to rugby league, football, league) is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Cardiff Demons RLFC are a rugby league side who play out of Taffs Well RFC in the north of Cardiff, Wales. ... The Cardiff Devils are a British Ice Hockey club from Cardiff, Wales who are members of the Elite Ice Hockey League. ... The Cardiff Marathon is an annual marathon race held in the Welsh city of Cardiff. ...


Cardiff is the principal home of the sport of Welsh or British Baseball, and hosts the annual England-Wales international game every four years, usually at Roath Park. The origins of the sport known as British baseball, or sometimes (less accurately) as Welsh baseball, date to 1892 when the governing bodies of England and Wales agreed to change the name of their sport from rounders to baseball. ... Roath Park (Welsh: Parc y Rhath) Cardiff, Wales, is Cardiffs most popular park which still retains a classic Victorian atmosphere and boasts a wide variety of facilities. ...

The Millennium Stadium
The Millennium Stadium

Cardiff hosted the 1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games. The Wales Empire Swimming Pool was demolished to make way for the Millennium Stadium. The pool in Swansea will remain as the Welsh National Pool until the 50 metre replacement pool will be built in Cardiff Bay as part of the International Sports Village. Of the venues used for the Games only the cycling track at Maindy remains. Cardiff also plays host to motorsport's World Rally Championship as part of Wales Rally GB. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The 1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games were held in Cardiff, Wales. ... The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... Cardiff International Sports Village (also known as the Cardiff Sports Village or the ISV) is located in Cardiff Bay in the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... The World Rally Championship (WRC) is a rallying series organised by the FIA, culminating with a champion driver and manufacturer. ... The Wales Rally Great Britain is the twelfth rally on the World Rally Championship schedule for 2005. ...


The city also features an international sporting venue, the 74,500 capacity Millennium Stadium, where the Welsh rugby team and the Welsh national football team plays. The 1999 Rugby Union World Cup final was held at the Millennium Stadium, and also doubles up as a venue for other concerts and festivals. The first ever indoor special stages of the World Rally Championship were held at the Millennium Stadium in September 2005. One of the annual Speedway Grand Prixs is staged in the Millenium Stadium, on purpose built full size track, each year. The Grand Prix is a round of the World Speedway Championship event. Speedway was staged at Cardiff White City greyhound stadium during the pre-war era with the first meeting being staged around Christmas 1928. In the early 1950s, a dedicated speedway stadium was constructed and the Cardiff Dragons raced in the National league for a short spell. The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ... First international  England 30 – 0 Wales  (19 February 1881) Largest win  Japan 0 – 98 Wales  (26 November 2004) Worst defeat  South Africa 96 – 13 Wales  (27 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6/6 (First in 1987) Best result Third 1987 The Wales national rugby union team (also referred to as... First International Scotland 4 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 26 March 1876) Largest win Wales 11 - 0 Ireland (Wrexham, Wales; 3 March 1888) Worst defeat Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1958) Best result Quarter-finals, 1958 European Championship Appearances none (First... Results of the 1999 Rugby World Cup The fourth Rugby World Cup broke new ground as for the first time the big eight nations did not qualify automatically. ... The World Rally Championship (WRC) is a rallying series organised by the FIA, culminating with a champion driver and manufacturer. ... The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm), is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital Cardiff, and is used primarily for rugby union and football home internationals. ...


Government and politics

Cardiff shown alongside other principal areas of Wales
Cardiff shown alongside other principal areas of Wales

Cardiff is host to the National Assembly for Wales, which is situated in Cardiff Bay. The building which is now known as the Senedd (Welsh for Legislature, Parliament or Senate) was opened on 1 March 2006, by The Queen. The executive and civil servants of the Welsh Assembly Government are based in Cardiff's Cathays Park while the Assembly Members, the Assembly Parliamentary Service and Ministerial support staff are based in Cardiff Bay. one of the subdivisions of Wales File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... one of the subdivisions of Wales File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... The National Assembly for Wales Building at night The Senedd in the daytime The Senedd (Welsh for Parliament or Senate) is the home of the National Assembly for Wales. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Official logo of the Welsh Assembly Government The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: , LlCC) was firstly an executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet from 1999 to 2007. ... Cathays Park is a civic area in central Cardiff, Wales, consisting of a number of early 20th century buildings and a central park area. ...


Cardiff County Council is based at County Hall in Atlantic Wharf, Cardiff Bay.


Cardiff elects 4 AMs to the Welsh Assembly and 4 MPs to the UK Parliament. There is also an electoral region for Cardiff, South Wales Central, that provides top-up seats to parties in the Assembly. Cardiff is part of the Wales constituency in European Parliament elections. The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Local government

Since local government reorganisation in 1996, Cardiff has been governed by The City and County Council of Cardiff. Voters elect 75 councillors every four years, with the next elections due to be held in 2008. Cardiff Council (Welsh: ) is the governing body for Cardiff, one of the Principal Areas of Wales. ...


Following the 2004 local elections, no individual political party has a majority on Cardiff City Council. The Liberal Democrats have 32 councillors (33 were elected, but one councillor crossed the floor to Plaid Cymru) and have formed a minority administration, Labour have 27, the Conservatives have 10 (12 elected but two now form the Independent Group), Plaid Cymru have 4 (3 elected, and one former Liberal Democrat) and two former Conservatives currently sit as Independents. The Leader of the Council, Cllr Rodney Berman, is from the Liberal Democrats. The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... Rodney Berman, a Liberal Democrat Councillor for the Plasnewydd ward, is leader of Cardiff County Council. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ...


National Assembly for Wales

The National Assembly for Wales has been based in Cardiff Bay since its formation in 1999. Cardiff elects 4 constituency Assembly Members (AMs) to the Assembly, with the individual constituencies for the Assembly being the same as for the UK Parliament. All of the city's residents have an extra vote for the South Wales Central region which increases proportionality to the Assembly. The most recent Welsh Assembly elections were held on 3 May 2007. Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... South Wales Central is an electoral region of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of eight constituencies. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Political representation

Cardiff is presently split into four parliamentary constituencies which form the electoral basis for elections to the United Kingdom Parliament and the National Assembly for Wales. The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ...


The constituencies and their representatives are:

The South Wales Central Assembly Region elects four Assembly Members to serve the area covered by Cardiff, Rhondda-Cynon-Taf and the Vale of Glamorgan local authority areas. These are currently: Cardiff Central is a parliamentary constituency for the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Welsh Assembly. ... Jennifer Nancy Willott (born 29 May 1974) is a British politician and the Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for Cardiff Central since the 2005 general election. ... Jenny Randerson (born 1948) is a Welsh Liberal Democrat politician, and Member of the Welsh Assembly for Cardiff Central. ... Cardiff North (Gogledd Caerdydd in Welsh) is an electoral constituency represented in the National Assembly for Wales and in the UK Parliaments House of Commons. ... Julie Morgan MP (2 November 1944 -) is a Labour politician in Wales. ... Jonathan Morgan BSc MSc AM (born 1974 in Cardiff) is a Welsh Conservative politician, currently a member of the Welsh Assembly Government. ... Cardiff South and Penarth (De Caerdydd a Phenarth in Welsh) is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Alun Edward Michael (born August 2, 1943) is a Welsh politician. ... Lorraine Barrett (b. ... Cardiff West (Gorllewin Caerdydd in Welsh) is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Kevin Denis Brennan (born 16 October 1959) is a British politician. ... Rhodri Morgan, pictured while on an eve of poll visit during the National Assembly of Wales election in 2003. ... South Wales Central is an electoral region of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of eight constituencies. ... Rhondda Cynon Taff (Welsh: Rhondda Cynon T f) is a county borough in Glamorgan, South Wales. ... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ...

  • David Melding (Conservative)
  • Andrew R. T. Davies (Conservative)
  • Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru)
  • Christopher Franks (Plaid Cymru)

Famous politicians who have represented Cardiff constituencies include: David Melding is a member of the National Assembly for Wales for the Welsh Conservative Party in the South Wales Central Region. ... Andrew Robert Tudor Davies (born 1968) is a British farmer and politician, who has been a Conservative Party member of the National Assembly for Wales since May 2007. ... Leanne Wood is the Plaid Cymru Assembly Member for South Wales Central contituency. ... Christopher Paul Franks (born 2 August 1951) is a Welsh engineer and politician. ...

James Callaghan is also a former MP for Heywood & Middleton. ... The Right Honourable Thomas George Thomas, 1st Viscount Tonypandy (29 January 1909 - 22 September 1997) was a British Labour politician. ...

Transport

Main article: Transport in Cardiff

Cardiff is the major transport hub in Wales and is the focus for many arterial road and rail routes that connect the city to the rest of Wales and England. Transport in Cardiff, capital and largest city in Wales involves road, rail, an extensive bus network and air. ...


Road

The M4 motorway is the principal motorway in the region that connects Cardiff with Newport and Bridgend, towns in West Wales such as Swansea and Carmarthen, and also cities in England, principally, Bristol and London. Cardiff is served by junctions 29-34 inclusive and is about 30-45 minutes from the Severn Bridge. The M4 motorway is a motorway in Great Britain linking London with Wales. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... Bridgend (Welsh: Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr) is a town in the traditional county of Glamorgan and the main town in the county borough of Bridgend in south Wales. ... West Wales is the west area of Wales bordered by South Wales to the east. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Carmarthen (Welsh Caerfyrddin - caer fort + Myrddin Moridunum, Merlin (origin disputed)) is the county town of Carmarthenshire, Wales. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the Ontario community, see Severn Bridge, Ontario. ...


The A48(M) motorway is another motorway within the city, linking the M4 to the city centre and the eastern suburbs. The A470 is another major road within the city that provides an important link with the Heads of the Valleys, Mid and North Wales. The A48(M) is a motorway in Wales, a short spur off the M4 towards Cardiff. ... The A470 at Bwlch Oerddrws The A470 is a major road in Wales, running from Cardiff to Llandudno. ...


As with many other cities car traffic has caused congestion problems and as such the council has designated bus lanes to improve transport into and out of the city centre. The council has also revealed plans to introduce congestion charging, as in London, but only once there has been significant investment in the city's public transport network. Road pricing is a generic term for charging for the use of roads using direct methods, charging the users of a specific section of the road network for its use. ...


There are several road and rail bridges that cross the River Taff in Cardiff. These include the Clarence Road Bridge, a comparatively modern bridge which replaced a swing bridge. The original bridge was named after the Duke of Clarence. The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


There are several taxi companies serving the city. Major Taxi Ranks in the city centre are found at The Hayes, Central Station, Wood Street, Greyfriars Road and St. Mary's Street. Cardiff city centre is a large and sprawling area that spreads out from Butetown in the south to Cathays Park in the north, and from Canton and Grangetown in the west to Adamsdown in the east. ... Cardiff Central railway station (Welsh: Caerdydd Canolog) is a major British railway station in Cardiff. ...


Cycling and walking

Roath Park in winter
Roath Park in winter

Much of Cardiff's central shopping zone is pedestrianised, and further pedestrianisation is planned as part of the current St David's 2 regeneration scheme. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 601 KB) Roath Brook flowing through Roath Park in the snow. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 601 KB) Roath Brook flowing through Roath Park in the snow. ... Roath Park (Welsh: Parc y Rhath) Cardiff, Wales, is Cardiffs most popular park which still retains a classic Victorian atmosphere and boasts a wide variety of facilities. ...


Although cycling in Cardiff is made easier by its relative flatness, provision for cycling within the city is fairly poor compared with many cities. Despite its adoption of positive policies on health and environment, Cardiff Council continues to implement major transport and regeneration projects without properly integrating the urban cyclist. Cardiff Council (Welsh: ) is the governing body for Cardiff, one of the Principal Areas of Wales. ...


The Taff Trail runs for 55 miles (88 km) alongside the River Taff, from Cardiff Bay to the market town of Brecon in the Brecon Beacons National Park. On Sundays in summer the Beacons Bike Bus enables cyclists to take their bikes into the Beacons and then ride back to Cardiff along the Trail. Mile post at Quakers Yard The Taff Trail is a popular walking and cycle path that runs for 55 miles between Cardiff Bay and Brecon in Wales. ... The River Taff is a large river in South Wales. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons, looking from the highest point Pen y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Cribyn, 795 m (2608 feet) The Brecon Beacons (Welsh: Bannau Brycheiniog) are a mountain range located in the south-east of Wales. ...


Bus

See Also: Cardiff Central Bus Station Cardiff Central Bus Station serves as the main bus interchange for the Welsh capital, Cardiff. ...


Cardiff has a comprehensive bus network, with council-owned Cardiff Bus providing the vast majority of routes in the city and as well as Newport, Penarth, Barry, Cardiff International Airport and Llantwit Major. Cardiff Bus has introduced "bendy buses" on the popular 17 and 18 routes to Canton, Ely and Caerau and on the Cardiff Bay route. Its hub is Cardiff Central Bus Station. Autobus redirects here. ... Cardiff Bus is an Australian Bus Company. ... Cardiff International Airport (Welsh: Maes Awyr Rhyngwladol Caerdydd) (IATA: CWL, ICAO: EGFF) is a major British airport located in the town of Rhoose, Vale of Glamorgan, approximately 12 miles (19 km) south-west of the Welsh capital, Cardiff, serving all of South and Mid Wales. ... A Mississauga Transit bus in Mississauga Ontario. ... Cardiff Central Bus Station serves as the main bus interchange for the Welsh capital, Cardiff. ...


National Express provides direct services to most cities in the UK, including high frequency services to nearby Swansea and Merthyr Tydfil, as well as major English and Scottish cities. Megabus also operates frequent discounted services to London. National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The Megabus logo Megabus is a no-frills intercity bus service run by the Scottish-based Stagecoach Group in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Railways

Cardiff has a metro system under the name of Valley Lines, which is operated by Arriva Trains Wales. There are eight lines which serve the 22 stations in the city, as well as towns in the South Wales valleys and the Vale of Glamorgan. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 861 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see User:Thryduulf/Relicensing if you wish to use this image under a different license. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 861 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see User:Thryduulf/Relicensing if you wish to use this image under a different license. ... Cardiff Central railway station (Welsh: Caerdydd Canolog) is a major British railway station in Cardiff. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... British Rail Class 143 unit, no. ... Arriva Trains Wales (Welsh: ) is a train operating company that operates urban and inter urban passenger services in Wales and the Welsh Marches. ... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ...


Cardiff Central Railway Station is the largest railway station in Wales with 7 platforms and one of the busiest in the UK. It provides direct services to major cities such as Newport, Bristol, Birmingham, London, Manchester, Nottingham, Southampton, Portsmouth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Edinburgh and Glasgow, as well as serving as an interchange for services from West Wales. There is also a regular shuttle service to Holyhead (for ferries to Ireland) and Wrexham in North Wales. Cardiff Central railway station (Welsh: Caerdydd Canolog) is a major British railway station in Cardiff. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Holyhead (Welsh: Caergybi, the fort of St. ... , Wrexham (Welsh: Wrecsam) is a large (former industrial) town, conurbation and principal area of Wales lying in north-eastern part of the country. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ...


Cardiff Queen Street railway station is the second busiest in Wales and is hub for routes via the Valley Lines services that connect the South Wales valleys and the Cardiff suburbs with the city centre and is situated on the north-eastern end of the city centre which is quite convenient for shoppers. This station also provides services to Cardiff Bay (from Platform 3), these do not call at Central. Cardiff Queen Street railway station (Welsh Caerdydd Heol y Frenhines) is seen by many as the main hub of the Valley Lines network around Cardiff - the solitary connection to Cardiff Bay is seen as part of the reason for this. ... British Rail Class 143 unit, no. ... The South Wales Valleys are a number of industrialised valleys in South Wales. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ...


Cardiff benefits from having a centralised and integrated transport system. The central bus and railway stations are sited together, at Central Square, in the centre of the city, allowing passengers to easily utilise both methods of transport in journeys.


Proposals to include a light-rail network in the city have been shelved due to rising costs. A Citadis tram of the Luas system in Dublin, Ireland Changchun LRT, China Shanghai Metro transit station, China A METRORail train approaching Preston Station in downtown Houston, Texas, USA. A LYNX light rail train from Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. The Guadalajara urban L-train system (SITEUR), at first a trolleybus...


Water

A waterbus operates hourly from Cardiff city centre to Cardiff Bay and onto Penarth. A New York Water Taxi docks at Pier 11 near Wall Street. ... Cardiff city centre is a large and sprawling area that spreads out from Butetown in the south to Cathays Park in the north, and from Canton and Grangetown in the west to Adamsdown in the east. ...


Air

Cardiff and South & West Wales are served by Cardiff International Airport (CWL), the only international airport in the Wales. It provides links domestically and internationally. It is situated in the village of Rhoose, 10 miles west of the city. There are regular bus services linking the airport with the Cardiff Central Bus Station as well as a train service from Rhoose Cardiff International Airport railway station to Cardiff Central. The airport is the fastest growing regional Airport in the UK and is expected to have its passangers increase 150% by 2015 Cardiff International Airport (Welsh: Maes Awyr Rhyngwladol Caerdydd) (IATA: CWL, ICAO: EGFF) is a major British airport located in the town of Rhoose, Vale of Glamorgan, approximately 12 miles (19 km) south-west of the Welsh capital, Cardiff, serving all of South and Mid Wales. ... Rhoose (Y Rhws), Wales, is a village located near the sea. ... Rhoose Cardiff International Airport railway station is a railway station that serves Cardiff International Airport in the village of Rhoose. ...


Time Zone

Cardiff time is the same as the rest of the UK, in that it is in the Western European Time zone; GMT is the standard time and in summer Western European Summer Time[11] Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Western European Time (WET, UTC+0) is the time zone covering parts of western and northwestern Europe, including the following countries and regions: Canary Islands, since 1946 (rest of Spain is CET, i. ... GMT redirects here. ... BST redirects here. ...


Education

Universities and colleges

Cardiff is home to three major institutions of higher education: Cardiff University, founded by Royal Charter in 1883 as the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire,[12] is a "red brick" university and member of the Russell Group of leading research led universities; University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC) gained university status in 1992; The Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama is a conservatoire established in 1949 and is based in the grounds of Cardiff Castle. The University of Glamorgan will also have a Cardiff campus (serving 2,200 students from 2007.) The total number of higher education students in the city will thus be around 45,000. The city also has two further education only colleges: Coleg Glan Hafren and St. David's College, although further education is offered at most high schools in the city. The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... Red Brick originally referred to the six civic British universities which were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and which achieved university status before World War II. The modern term roughly equates to those members of the so-called Russell group of universities founded between... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Affiliations University of Wales, Coalition of Modern Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... The Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama is a conservatoire located in Cardiff. ... A university school of music or college of music, or academy of music or conservatoire (British English) — also known as a conservatory (American English) or a conservatorium (Australian English) — is a higher education institution dedicated to teaching the art of music, including the playing of musical instruments, musical composition, musicianship... The Norman keep Burgess summer smoking room Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) in Wales was founded by the Normans in 1091, on the site of a Roman fort whose remains can still be seen. ... The University of Glamorgan (Welsh: Prifysgol Morgannwg) is a university in Glamorgan, Wales with campuses in Trefforest, Glyntaff, Merthyr Tydfil and Cardiff. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... Coleg Glan Hafren is a Further Education college based in Cardiff. ...


Cardiff University was home to Millicent McKenzie who was possibly the first female in Britain to be addressed as ‘professor’, becoming associate professor in 1904 and full professor in 1910.[13] Famous alumni of Cardiff University include Neil Kinnock, Glenys Kinnock, millionaire businessman and philanthropist Julian Hodge, the BBC newsreader Huw Edwards, and fellow BBC personalities Jeremy Bowen and Adrian Chiles. Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... Image:GlenysKinnock. ... Sir Julian Hodge (October 15, 1904 - July 17, 2004) was a London-born entrepreneur and banker who lived in Wales for most of his life, starting at age five. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... “Anchorman” redirects here. ... Huw Edwards may refer to two United Kingdom public figures: Huw Edwards, the former Labour Party Member of Parliament Huw Edwards, the presenter of BBC ONEs Ten OClock News Huw Edwards, a character in EastEnders This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same... Jeremy Bowen has been Middle East Editor for BBC News since June 2005. ... Adrian Chiles (born 21 March 1967 in Birmingham, England) is a British television and radio presenter. ...


Schools

Cardiff has eighty-three state primary schools (two bilingual, ten Welsh medium),[14] and twenty state secondary schools, of which two are Welsh medium.[15] There are also a number of independent schools in the city, including Llandaff Cathedral School, Kings Monkton and Howell's School, a single-sex girls' school (until sixth form). Notable schools include Whitchurch High School, the largest in Wales, and Fitzalan High School one of the most multi-cultural state schools in the UK; Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Glantaf the largest Welsh medium secondary in the country. Also, Cardiff High School which has exceptional academic achievement and is rated one of the best in the UK. Education in Wales differs in certain respects from the system used elsewhere in the United Kingdom. ... Whitchurch High School is a large, co-educational, comprehensive secondary school in the suburb of Whitchurch in Cardiff, Wales taught in the medium of English. ... Fitzalan High School is a public secondary school located in the Canton/Leckwith area of Cardiff, Wales. ... Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Glantaf (Welsh: Glantaf Welsh Comprehensive School) is the largest Welsh-medium school in Wales. ... Cardiff High School is a comprehensive school in the Cyncoed area of the city of Cardiff in South Wales. ...


As well as academic institutions, Cardiff is also home to other educational and learning organisations such as Techniquest, a hands on science discovery centre that now has franchises throughout Wales.[16] Techniquest is also part of the Wales Gene Park in collaboration with Cardiff University, NHS Wales and the Welsh Development Agency (WDA).[17] Techniquest is a science and discovery centre in Cardiff Bay, Wales. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... The logo of NHS Wales NHS Wales is the name for the National Health Services activities in Wales. ... The Welsh Development Agency (WDA) is a public sector quango or NGO funded by the British government for the purpose of encouraging business development and investment in Wales. ...


International Baccalaureate Organisation

Cardiff is also home of the largest regional office of the International Baccalaureate Organisation (IB). The curriculum and assessment centre, which is responsible for overseeing the creation and grading of various IB assessments is located in Cardiff, as are the offices of various professional support services. [13] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ...


Health

There are seven major hospitals in the city. The University Hospital of Wales, which is also known simply as 'The Heath' or the 'UHW', is the third largest hospital in the UK and deals with most accidents and emergencies. Llandough Hospital is located in the south of the city. The city's newest hospital, St. David's Hospital (built behind the former building) is located in the Canton area and provides services for the elderly and children. Cardiff Royal Infirmary closed in 1999 but reopened as a medical centre in 2003. There is also Rookwood Hospital, Llandaff and Velindre Hospital, and Whitchurch Hospital. BUPA has a hospital in the city which is located in Pentwyn. University Hospital of Wales (referred to locally as the Heath) is situated on the outskirts of central Cardiff, Wales. ... Cardiff Royal Infirmary or CRI is an Hospital situated near Newport road in the heart of Cardiff City. ... Rookwood is a Spinal injuries rehabilitation hospital situated in the city of Cardiff in South Wales. ... Whitchurch Hospital is a psychiatric hospital in Whitchurch, an area in the north of Cardiff. ... BUPA is a healthcare organisation with bases on four continents and more than eight million customers in 192 countries. ...


Twinning

Cardiff has twinning arrangements with:* Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Luhansk Oblast (Луганська область, Luhanska oblast in Ukrainian) is an oblast (province) of eastern Ukraine. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Overview of the city Pernik (Bulgarian: ) is a city in western Bulgaria with a population of 91,883 as of 2006. ... Pernik Province is a province in western Bulgaria, neighbouring Serbia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... County District Midhordland Municipality NO-1201 Administrative centre Bergen Mayor (2007) Gunnar Bakke (Frp) Official language form Neutral[1] Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 215 465 km² 445 km² 0. ...   is a county in Norway, bordering Sogn og Fjordane, Buskerud, Telemark and Rogaland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Traditional city flag City coat of arms Motto: Favet Neptunus eunti (Latin: Shall Neptune favour the traveller) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Pays de la Loire Department Loire-Atlantique (44) Mayor Jean-Marc Ayrault  (PS) (since 1989) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ... Capital Nantes Land area¹ 32,082 km² Regional President Jacques Auxiette (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Stuttgart. ... For other uses, see Stuttgart (disambiguation). ... Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE1 Capital Stuttgart Minister-President Günther Oettinger (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  35,752 km² (13,804 sq mi) Population 10,741,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links National_emblem_of_the_People's_Republic_of_China. ... A view of the Xiamen University campus Xiamen (Simplified Chinese: 厦门; Traditional Chinese: 廈門; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is a coastal sub-provincial city in southeastern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal map spelling: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wales Portal

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new 500 acre freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales. ... Cardiff city centre is a large and sprawling area that spreads out from Butetown in the south to Cathays Park in the north, and from Canton and Grangetown in the west to Adamsdown in the east. ... This page is about the popular music scene in Cardiff, Wales, UK. Cardiff boasts a thriving local music scene. ... This is a list of cultural venues in the City of Cardiff, Wales. ... The Parliamentary constituency boundaries used in Wales up to the United Kingdom general election, 2005 were drawn up before the Local Government reorganisation in 1996, and consequent changes to Preserved County boundaries have left some constituencies spanning county boundaries. ... This is a listing of places in Cardiff, capital city of Wales. ... Type Unicameral Presiding Officer Dafydd Elis-Thomas Members 60 Political groups Labour Plaid Cymru Conservative Liberal Democrats Last elections May 3, 2007 Meeting place Senedd, Cardiff, Wales Web site http://www. ... The Big Number Change was the name given to the update of dialling codes in the U.K. in response to the rapid late 1990s growth of telecommunications and impending exhaustion of numbers. ... 0207 and 0208 are erroneous British telephone STD codes, which are commonly and incorrectly quoted in speech and writing by residents of the United Kingdom instead of the correct code of 020 for London. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ...

References

  1. ^ Eurocities, Retrieved on 12 November
  2. ^ The Garden of Cardiff
  3. ^ River Lleucu
  4. ^ [1] Met Office statistics
  5. ^ [2] Met Office statistics
  6. ^ [3] Weather Statistics
  7. ^ Cardiff as Capital of Wales: Formal Recognition by Government. The Times. 21 December 1955.
  8. ^ Office for National Statistics, 2001. In 2004, the GVA of Cardiff grew at 1% faster than the average for the UK so that it was 117% of UK GVA or 150% of UK GVA. (or [www.cardiff.gov.uk/ObjView.asp?Object_ID=3743]. (PDF)
  9. ^ Number ranges allocated by OFCOM for drama purposes
  10. ^ Red Dragon Centre
  11. ^ [4]Time zone in Cardiff
  12. ^ Cardiff University [5]
  13. ^ [Cunningham V. and Goodwin J. (2001) Cardiff University – A Celebration, Cardiff University External Relations Division]
  14. ^ Cardiff Council [6]
  15. ^ Cardiff Council [7]
  16. ^ Techniquest [8]
  17. ^ Wales Gene Park[9]

is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ...

External links

Coordinates: 51°28′40.73″N, 3°10′37.39″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Category:People from Cardiff


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Cardiff Hotels Best Accommodation in Cardiff. Over 400 hotels in Cardiff. - OANDA Customizable Currency Converter (765 words)
Attractively situated at a communicative place, The Royal Hotel, Cardiff is the newest in the town.
Cardiff Sandringham Hotel Attractively situated in the center of the town, Cardiff Sandringham Hotel offers warm family welcome to its visitors.
Situated in close proximity to the city center as well as to South Wales, Quality Hotel Cardiff is where your pleasant and comfortable stay is guaranteed.
Cardiff Castle (1820 words)
However, in the midst of this urbanization, Cardiff's ancient past is grandly displayed, in the form of a fine castle.
After the King-maker's death in 1471, the fortress at Cardiff passed first to his eldest daughter, another Isabel, and then to her sister, Ann (whose husband, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, became King Richard III in 1483).
Cardiff Castle was a prize sought by both sides of the struggle, the Royalists and Parliamentary forces, but it was eventually taken by Oliver Cromwell's army.
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