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Encyclopedia > Cardamom
Cardamom

True Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Liliopsida
Order: Zingiberales
Family: Zingiberaceae
Genera

Amomum
Elettaria Cardamom may refer to: Cardamom (or cardamon), species within two genera of the ginger family Zingiberaceae, namely Elettaria and Amomum Black cardamom (or brown cardamom), a plant in the family Zingiberaceae having pods used as a spice Cardamom Khmer (or Western Kymer), a Khmer language dialect spoken by some Khmer... Image File history File links Koeh-057. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Liliopsida is the botanical name for a class. ... Families see text The Zingiberales are an order of flowering plants that includes many familiar plants like ginger, cardamom, turmeric, myoga, and also banana and arrowroot. ... Subdivisions Subfamily Siphonochiloideae  Tribe Siphonochileae   Siphonochilus Subfamily Tamijioideae  Tribe Tamijieae   Tamijia Subfamily Alpinioideae  Tribe Alpinieae   Aframomum   Alpinia - galangal   Amomum   Aulotandra   Cyphostigma   Elettaria - cardamom  Elettariopsis   Etlingera   Geocharis   Geostachys   Hornstedtia   Leptosolena   Paramomum   Plagiostachys   Renealmia   Siliquamomum (Incertae Sedis)   Vanoverberghia  Tribe Riedelieae   Burbidgea   Pleuranthodium   Riedelia   Siamanthus Subfamily Zingiberoideae  Tribe Zingibereae   Boesenbergia   Camptandra   Caulokaempferia (Incertae... Amomum is a genus of plants, such as the cardamom and grains of paradise, remarkable for their pungency and aromatic properties. ... Binomial name Elettaria caramomum Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) is a pungent aromatic spice belonging to the Zingiberaceae family. ...

The name cardamom is used for herbs within two genera of the ginger family Zingiberaceae, namely Elettaria and Amomum. Both varieties take the form of a small seedpod, triangular in cross-section and spindle-shaped, with a thin papery outer shell and small black seeds. Elettaria pods are light green in color, while Amomum pods are larger and dark brown. For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... Subdivisions Subfamily Siphonochiloideae  Tribe Siphonochileae   Siphonochilus Subfamily Tamijioideae  Tribe Tamijieae   Tamijia Subfamily Alpinioideae  Tribe Alpinieae   Aframomum   Alpinia - galangal   Amomum   Aulotandra   Cyphostigma   Elettaria - cardamom  Elettariopsis   Etlingera   Geocharis   Geostachys   Hornstedtia   Leptosolena   Paramomum   Plagiostachys   Renealmia   Siliquamomum (Incertae Sedis)   Vanoverberghia  Tribe Riedelieae   Burbidgea   Pleuranthodium   Riedelia   Siamanthus Subfamily Zingiberoideae  Tribe Zingibereae   Boesenbergia   Camptandra   Caulokaempferia (Incertae...

Contents

Types of cardamom and their distribution

The two main genera of the ginger family that are named as forms of cardamom are distributed as follows:

  • Elettaria (commonly called cardamom, green cardamom, or true cardamom) is distributed from India to Malaysia.
  • Amomum (commonly known as black cardamom, brown cardamom, Kravan, Java cardamom, Bengal cardamom, Siamese cardamom, white or red cardamom) is distributed mainly in Asia and Australia.

Binomial name Elettaria caramomum Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) is a pungent aromatic spice belonging to the Zingiberaceae family. ... Amomum is a genus of plants, such as the cardamom and grains of paradise, remarkable for their pungency and aromatic properties. ... Binomial name Amomum subulatum Roxb. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...

Uses

All the different cardamom species and varieties are used mainly as cooking spices and as medicines. In general, For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ...

  • Elettaria cardamomum (the usual type of cardamom) is used as a spice, a masticatory, and in medicine; it is also sometimes smoked; it is used as a food plant by the larva of the moth Endoclita hosei.
  • Amomum is used as an ingredient in traditional systems of medicine in China, India, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
  • In the Middle East and Turkey, green cardamom powder is used as a spice for sweet dishes as well as traditional flavouring in coffee and tea. It is also used to some extent in some dish recipes. In Arabic, cardamom is called al-Hayl.
  • In South Asia green cardamom is often used in traditional Indian sweets and in tea, or chai. Black cardamom is sometimes used in garam masala for curries. It is often referred to by its size as being 'Moti Elaichi' or fat cardamom. In Hindi and Urdu cardamom is called elaichi. It is called Elakka in Malayalam, language of kerala which contributes 70% of Indian cardamom.[1]
  • In Northern Europe, cardamom is commonly used in sweet foods.
  • It has also been known to be used for making gin.

A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. ... Endoclita is a genus of moths of the family Hepialidae. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A variety of Indian sweets Indian sweets or Mithai, consist of many different kinds of milk, sugar and flour-based confectioneries originating from the Indian sub-continent. ... Garam masala is a blend of ground spices common in the Indian cuisine, whose literal meaning is hot (or warm) spice. There are many variants: most traditional mixes use just cinnamon, roasted cumin, cloves, nutmeg (and/or mace) and green cardamom seed or black cardamom pods. ... Malayalam (മലയാളം ) is the language spoken predominantly in the state of Kerala, in southern India. ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ...

Uses in cuisines around the world

Cardamom has a strong, unique taste, with an intensely aromatic fragrance. It is a common ingredient in Indian cooking, and is often used in baking in Nordic countries. One of the most expensive spices by weight, little is needed to impart the flavour. Cardamom is best stored in pod form, because once the seeds are exposed or ground, they quickly lose their flavour. However, high-quality ground cardamom is often more readily (and cheaply) available, and is an acceptable substitute. For recipes requiring whole cardamom pods, a generally accepted equivalent is 10 pods equals 1½ teaspoons of ground cardamom. Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Baking Baking is the technique of prolonged cooking of food by dry heat acting by conduction, and not by radiation, normally in an oven, but also in hot ashes, or on hot stones. ... Political map of the Nordic countries and associated territories. ...


In traditional medicine

In South Asia, green cardamom called "Elaichi", in Hindi and Urdu, is broadly used to treat infections in teeth and gums, to prevent and treat throat troubles, congestion of the lungs and pulmonary tuberculosis, inflammation of eyelids and also digestive disorders. It is also reportedly used as an antidote for both snake and scorpion venom. The gingiva, or gums, consist of the tissue surrounding the roots of the teeth and covering the jawbone. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... The digestive system is the organ system that breaks down and absorbs nutrients that are essential for growth and maintenance. ... An antidote is a substance which can counteract a form of poisoning. ... It has been suggested that Snake poison be merged into this article or section. ...


Species in the genus Amomum are also used in traditional Indian medicine. Among other species, varieties and cultivars, Amomum villosum cultivated in China, Laos and Vietnam is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat stomach-aches, constipation, dysentery, and other digestion problems. "Tsaoko" cardamom Amomum tsao-ko is cultivated in Yunnan, China and northwest Vietnam, both for medicinal purposes and as a spice. Increased demand since the 1980s, principally from China, for both Amomum villosum and Amomum tsa-ko has provided a key source of income for poor farmers living at higher altitudes in localized areas of China, Laos and Vietnam, people typically isolated from many other markets. Shirodhara, one of the techniques of Ayurveda Ayurveda (Devanagari: ) or Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient system of health care that is native to the Indian subcontinent. ... Constipation or irregularity, is a condition of the digestive system where a person (or animal) experiences hard feces that are difficult to egest; it may be extremely painful, and in severe cases (fecal impaction) lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction. ... Dysentery (formerly known as flux or the bloody flux) is the term for tenesmus (painful straining to pass stool), cramping, and frequent, small-volume severe diarrhea associated with blood in the feces. ... Yunan redirects here. ...


Gallery

References

General

  1. Mabberley, D.J. The Plant-book: A Portable Dictionary of the Higher Plants. Cambridge University Press, 1996.
  2. Gernot Katzer's Spice Pages: Cardamom
  3. Plant Cultures: botany and history of Cardamom
  4. Pham Hoang Ho 1993, Cay Co Vietnam [Plants of Vietnam: in Vietnamese], vols. I, II & III, Montreal.
  5. Buckingham, J.S. & Petheram, R.J. 2004, Cardamom cultivation and forest biodiversity in northwest Vietnam, Agricultural Research and Extension Network, Overseas Development Institute, London UK.
  6. Aubertine, C. 2004, Cardamom (Amomum spp.) in Lao PDR: the hazardous future of an agroforest system product, in 'Forest products, livelihoods and conservation: case studies of non-timber forest products systems vol. 1-Asia, Center for International Forest Research. Jakarta, Indonesia.

  Results from FactBites:
 
GourmetSleuth - Cardomon, Cardamom (201 words)
Cardamom (frequently misspelled and mispronounced "cardamon") is the common name for certain plant species native to
The true cardamom has large leaves and white flowers with blue stripes and yellow borders; it grows to about 3 m (about 10 ft) in height.
The fruit is a small capsule with 8 to 16 brown seeds; the seeds are used as a spice.
Cardamom - LoveToKnow 1911 (436 words)
CARDAMOM, the fruit of several plants of the genera Elettaria and Amomum, belonging to the natural order Zingiberaceae, the principal of which is Elettaria Cardamomum, from which the true officinal or Malabar cardamom is derived.
It is a native of the mountainous parts of the Malabar coast of India, and the fruits are procured either from wild plants or by cultivation throughout Travancore, western Mysore, and along the western Ghauts.
Cardamoms generally are possessed of a pleasant aromatic odour, and an agreeable, spicy taste.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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