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Encyclopedia > Caravel
Portuguese caravel, adorned with the Cross of the Order of Christ. This was the standard model used by the Portuguese in their voyages of exploration. It could accommodate about 20 sailors.
Portuguese caravel, adorned with the Cross of the Order of Christ. This was the standard model used by the Portuguese in their voyages of exploration. It could accommodate about 20 sailors.[1]
Caravela Latina / Latin Caravel
Caravela Latina / Latin Caravel
Caravela Redonda / Square-rigged Caravel
Caravela Redonda / Square-rigged Caravel

A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, two- or three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration from the 15th century. Its origins date back to the qarib used by muslim Andalusian explorers in the 13th century.[2] The Seal of the Grand-Masters Evrard de Barres and Regnaud de Vichier depict the Dome of the ROCK. The Order of Christ was the heritage of the Templar Knights. ... Image File history File links Caravel_Boa_Esperanca_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Caravel_Boa_Esperanca_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Caravel_Espirito_Santo_Brazil. ... Image File history File links Caravel_Espirito_Santo_Brazil. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ...


Although the carrack (or Nau) represented the state of the art in later medieval shipbuilding, there were purposes for which it was not appropriate. Initially carracks were used for exploration by the Portuguese venturing out along the west African coast and into the Atlantic Ocean. But large, full-rigged ships could not always be sailed with the precision necessary for inshore surveying in unknown waters. The explorers soon came to prefer the Barge (Barca) or the Balinger (Barinel) of around 50 to 200 tons, or the light two or three-masted Mediterranean lateen-rigged vessels known as caravels. The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a university in Flagstaff, Arizona in the United States. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A vessel (xebec) with three lateens Dhow with lateen sail in bad tack with the sail pressing against the mast, in Mozambique. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Because of its smaller size, the caravel as shown, was able to explore upriver in shallow coastal waters. With the lateen sails affixed, it was able to go speedily over shallow water and take deep wind, while with the square Atlantic-type sails attached, the caravel was very fast. Its economy, speed, agility, and power made the caravel esteemed as the best sailing vessel of its time. It generally carried two or three masts with lateen sails, while later types had four masts. Although widely used for exploration and discovery it had to be later replaced by the more capacious Nao more profitable for trading purposes. NAO can refer to: A Carrack (a three- or four-masted sailing ship developed in the Mediterranean in the 15th century) National Audit Office Nautical Almanac Office New Age Outlaws, now known as Voodoo Kin Mafia in TNA Wrestling North Atlantic Oscillation The Scotland-based electro/rock band North Atlantic...


Early caravels were usually two-masted boats of around 50 tons with an overall length of between 20–30 m and a high length-to-beam ratio of around 3.5:1 and narrow ellipsoidal (not circular as in the Nao) frames making them very fast and maneuverable but with somewhat low capacity. Towards the end of the 15th century the caravel was occasionally modified by giving it the same rig as a carrack with a foresail, square mainsail and lateen mizzen, but, unlike the unweatherly carrack, the caravel did not have a high forecastle or much of a sterncastle. In this form it was sometimes known as caravela redonda (a bulging square sail is said to be round or redonda in the Iberian tradition) and it was in such ships that Christopher Columbus set out on his famous expedition in 1492; Santa Maria was a small carrack which served as the flagship, and Pinta and Niña were caravels of around 20 m with a beam of 7 m. This article is about the unit of length. ... NAO can refer to: A Carrack (a three- or four-masted sailing ship developed in the Mediterranean in the 15th century) National Audit Office Nautical Almanac Office New Age Outlaws, now known as Voodoo Kin Mafia in TNA Wrestling North Atlantic Oscillation The Scotland-based electro/rock band North Atlantic... A foresail refers to one of several types of sail set on the foremost mast (foremast) of a sailing vessel: Any triangular sail set forward of the foremast, such as a jib. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... forecastle with figurehead Grand Turk Focsle of the Prince William, a modern square rigged ship, in the North Sea. ... {{dablink|For other meanings, see Stern (disambiguation). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... The Santa Maria was the largest of the three ships used by Christopher Columbus in his first voyage across the Atlantic Ocean in 1492. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... Replica of the Pinta, in Palos de la Frontera For the human skin disease, see pinta (disease). ... The Niña (the Spanish word for girl) was one of the three ships used by Christopher Columbus in his first voyage towards the Indies in 1492. ...


In the first half of the 16th century, a specialized fighting ship with that same name caravela redonda was created by the Portuguese to act as an escort in Brazil and in the East Indies route. It had a foremast with square sails and three other masts with a lateen each to a total of 4 masts. The hull was galleon-shaped (some experts consider this vessel a forerunner of the fighting galleon). The Portuguese Man o' War was named after this curious fighting ship type which was in use until the 18th century. A Dutch man-of-war firing a salute. ...


References

  • Museu da Marinha
  • Museu da Marinha , fac-similes
  • Musée de la Marine, Paris.
  • John M. Hobson (2004), The Eastern Origins of Western Civilisation, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0521547245.
  • Instituto Camões. Caravela

Caravel Model of the French submarine Plongeur at the Musée national de la Marine, Paris. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


See also

Look up Caravel in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
In boat building, carvel is a method of constructing wooden boats by fixing planks to a frame so that the planks butt up against each other, gaining support from the frame and forming a smooth hull. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The barca longa was a two or three-masted lugger found on the coasts of Spain and Portugal as well as more widely in the Mediterranean Sea. ... A barc is a type of sailing vessel. ... This article is about the ship. ... In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... A Bilander, also spelled billander or belandre, was a small European merchant ship with two masts, used in the Netherlands for coast and canal traffic and occasionally seen in the North Sea but more frequently to be seen in the Mediterranean Sea. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... The occupied boats are catboats, but with a mast and boom rig A catboat (alternate spelling: cat boat), or a cat-rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward (, near the front of the boat). ... A model of a vessel of the clipper type, the four-masted barque named Belle Étoile A clipper was a very fast multiple-masted sailing ship of the 19th century. ... While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more then a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands. ... Excavated cog from 1380 Cogs or rather cog-built vessels came into existence around 12th century AD. They were cheracterized by flush-laid flat bottom at midships but gradually shifted to overlapped strakes near the posts. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate and larger than a coastal patrol craft. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... A Dhow near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... For the fictional moon, see Felucca (Ultima). ... A postcard showing the St. ... Dutch fluyts of 17th Century A fluyt or a flute (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel originally designed as a dedicated cargo vessel. ... A fore-and-aft rig is a sailing rig consisting mainly of sails that are set along the line of the keel rather than perpendicular to it. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... The galeas is a small type of trade ship, which was common in the Baltic Sea and North Sea during the 17th to the early 20th centuries. ... Galiot in Willaumezs Dictionnaire de la Marine Galiots (or galliots) were types of ships from the Age of Sail. ... A Spanish galleon. ... In sailing, a gunter is a wire that leads from one end of a gaff to the other. ... A hermaphrodite brig, or brig-schooner, is a type of two-masted sailing ship which has square sails on the foremast combined with a schooner rig on the mainmast (triangular topsail over a gaff mainsail). ... A hoy was a small sloop-rigged coasting ship or a heavy barge used for freight. ... A jackass-barque, sometimes spelled jackass bark, is a sailing ship with 3 (or more masts), of which the foremast is square-rigged and the main is partially square-rigged (topsail, topgallant, etc. ... A junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... A longship tacking in the wind Longships Are Built in the Land of the Slavs by Nicholas Roerich (1903) Longships were ships primarily used by the Scandinavian Vikings and the Saxon people to raid coastal and inland settlements during the European Middle Ages. ... // For the bird of prey, see Laggar Falcon. ... A mast aft rig is a sailboat sail-plan that uses a single mast set in the aft half of the hull to support a jib or multiple staysails, with either a small or completely absent mainsail. ... A Mersey flat is a two masted, doubled-ended barge with rounded bilges, carvel build and fully decked. ... A multihull is a ship or boat with more than one hull. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... There are two classifications of Pink. ... A pinnace is a light boat, propelled by sails or oars, formerly used as a tender for guiding merchant and war vessels. ... A pocket cruiser, microcruiser or pocket yacht is a small, often lightweight sailboat with a cabin, which is intended for recreational cruising (either overnight or for extended periods) of the owners chosen waterways. ... A polacca is a type of seventeenth-century sailing vessel, similar to the xebec. ... A pram or pramm was a type of shallow-draught flat-bottomed ship used in Europe during the 18th century, particularly in the Baltic Sea during the Great Northern War and Napoleonic Wars, as the prams shallow draught allowed it to approach the shore. ... R. M. Munroes 1898 proa A Proa is a multihull vessel consisting of two (usually) unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... Punting while dressed for Cambridge graduation This article concentrates on the history and development of punts and punting in England, for other usages see the disambiguation pages at punt and punter. ... A sailing hydrofoil or hydrosail is a sailboat with wing-like foils mounted under the hull. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... The sixareen or Sixern (Norwegian: Seksring meaning six-oared), is a clinker built boat, evolved as a larger version of the Yoal, when the need arose for crews to fish further from shore. ... For the military definition of sloop see: Sloop-of-war. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... The Smack was a English sailing vessel that was used to bring the fish to Market for most of the 19th Century and even in small numbers up to the Second World War. ... This article is about snow, the merchant vessel. ... Main-mast of a square-rigged ship, with all square sails set except the course. ... The USCGC Eagle. ... The distinctive sailing barges that were once a common sight on Londons River Thames, were commercial craft relying on sail power alone. ... Photograph of an Orma 60 trimaran in Sandhamn before the Round Gotland Race 2005 A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull (vaka) and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... A traditional boat found in the southern Philippine island of Mindanao characterized by a colorful sail of assorted vertical colors. ... A wherry (meaning boat) is a boat used for carrying cargo on rivers and canals in England. ... A windjammer is a type of sailing ship with a large iron hull, usually used for cargo in the nineteenth century. ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii. ... XEBEC is a subsidiary of the anime studio Production I.G. that specialises in the production of television anime. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Yawl sailing vessel. ... The Yoal, often referred to as the Ness Yoal, is a clinker built craft used traditionally in the Shetland Islands. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Caravel - definition of Caravel in Encyclopedia (351 words)
A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century.
Early caravels were usually two-masters of around 50 tons with an overall length of between 20–30 m and a high length-to-beam ratio of around 1:7 making them very fast and manoeuvrable.
Towards the end of the 15th century the caravel was modified by giving it the same rig as a carrack with a foresail, square mainsail and lateen mizzen but, unlike the unweatherly carrack, the caravel did not have a high forecastle or much of a sterncastle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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