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Encyclopedia > Caramel
Caramel candy

Caramel (IPA: /ˈkærəmɛl/, also /ˈkɑrməl/ in some U.S. regions) is a confection that is beige to dark brown in color, derived from the caramelization of sugar. Caramel is used to flavor puddings, desserts and beverages, such as Coca-Cola. Caramel is also used as a food colorant. On labels, it is called E150. Image File history File links Emblem-contradict. ... The Maillard reaction is a chemical reaction between an amino acid and a reducing sugar, usually requiring the addition of heat. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 664 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 664 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Caramel may refer to: Caramel, a sweet food Caramel (band), a rock band from Canada Category: ... The term confectionery refers to food items rich in sugar. ... For the album by The Arrogant Worms, see Beige (album). ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ... Pudding can be prepared with a large variety of toppings such as fresh fruit and/or berries, and whipped cream Christmas pudding Dessert pudding Illustrations from Isabella Beetons Mrs Beetons Book of Household Management, 1861 Pudding most often refers to a dessert, but can also be a savory dish. ... Not to be confused with Desert. ... The word drink is primarily a verb, meaning to ingest liquids, see Drinking. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Food coloring spreading on a thin water film. ... E numbers are codes for food additives and are usually found on food labels throughout the European Union. ...


Caramel is made by heating sugar slowly to around 170°C/340°F. As the sugar melts and approaches this temperature, the molecules break down into volatile compounds with a characteristic caramel color and flavor.


A variety of candies, confections, and desserts are made with caramel: caramel apples, barley sugar, caramel with nuts (such as praline, nougat, or brittle), and caramel with custard (such as crème caramel or crème brûlée). For other uses, see Candy (disambiguation). ... The term confectionery refers to food items rich in sugar. ... Caramel apples are apples coated with caramel, generally skewered on a thin wooden stick. ... Barley sugars are a traditional variety of English boiled sweet, or hard candy, yellow or orange in colour with an extract of barley added as flavouring. ... Look up nut in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pralines on a cutting board Pralines and box posed Pralines in a box Praline is a family of confections made from nuts and sugar syrup. ... Nougat is a term used to describe a variety of similar confectioneries made with sugar or honey, roasted nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios or hazelnuts are common, but not peanuts) and sometimes chopped candied fruit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article focuses on egg-thickened custards. ... Homemade flan, Florida style Crème caramel, flan, or caramel custard is a kind of rich custard dessert with a layer of soft caramel on top, as opposed to crème brûlée, which is custard with a hard caramel top. ... Crème brûlée Crème brûlée (French for burnt cream; IPA: in English, in French) is a dessert consisting of a rich custard base topped with a layer of hard caramel, created by burning sugar under a grill or other intense heat source. ...


Caramel candy

Caramel also refers to a soft, chewy, caramel-flavored candy made by boiling milk, sugar, butter, vanilla essence, water, and glucose syrup. Caramel candy is not heated above the firm ball stage (no more than 120°C/248°F), which would cause caramelization. Glucose (Glc), a monosaccharide (or simple sugar), is an important carbohydrate in biology. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Confectionery. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Caramel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (260 words)
Caramel (IPA: ['kærəˌmɛl], also ['kɑrˌməl] in some U.S. regions) is a food which has a colour from orange to dark brown and a sweet toasted flavour, derived from the caramelization of sugar.
Various candies, confections, and desserts are made with caramel: caramel apples, barley sugar, caramel with nuts (such as praline, nougat, or brittle), and caramel with custard (such as crème caramel or crème brûlée).
The colour and flavour of caramel candy are due not to caramelization, but to the Stecker degradation or the Maillard reaction, which occurs between an amino acid and a reducing sugar.
Caramel - Background, History, Raw Materials, The Manufacturing Process (1838 words)
Caramel is often eaten as little brown, sweet, buttery nuggets wrapped in cello-phane, but it is also delicious in candy bars and on top of fresh popcorn.
Caramel manufacturers use the term "short" to characterize a caramel that is too soft (perhaps too moist) or "long" for a caramel that is quite chewy.
In a conventional caramelization process, the sugar syrups are cooked to the proper moisture level, added to the fat and milk, heated, and then allowed to caramelize (develop the characteristic flavor and brown color) in a browning kettle.
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