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Encyclopedia > Cape Feare
The Simpsons episode
"Cape Feare"
Promotional artwork for "Cape Feare".
Episode no. 83
Prod. code 9F22
Orig. airdate October 7, 1993
Show runner(s) Al Jean & Mike Reiss
Written by Jon Vitti
Directed by Rich Moore
Chalkboard "The cafeteria deep fryer is not a toy"[1]
Couch gag The family forms a chorus line, which turns into a large production number.[2]
Guest star(s) Kelsey Grammer as Sideshow Bob
DVD
commentary
Matt Groening
Al Jean
Jon Vitti
Season 5
September 30, 1993May 19, 1994
  1. Homer's Barbershop Quartet
  2. Cape Feare
  3. Homer Goes to College
  4. Rosebud
  5. Treehouse of Horror IV
  6. Marge on the Lam
  7. Bart's Inner Child
  8. Boy-Scoutz N the Hood
  9. The Last Temptation of Homer
  10. $pringfield
  11. Homer the Vigilante
  12. Bart Gets Famous
  13. Homer and Apu
  14. Lisa vs. Malibu Stacy
  15. Deep Space Homer
  16. Homer Loves Flanders
  17. Bart Gets an Elephant
  18. Burns' Heir
  19. Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song
  20. The Boy Who Knew Too Much
  21. Lady Bouvier's Lover
  22. Secrets of a Successful Marriage
List of all The Simpsons episodes
Seasons
1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10
11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19

"Cape Feare" is the second episode of The Simpsons' fifth season, which premiered on the Fox network on October 7, 1993 after being held over from season four.[1] The episode features Sideshow Bob trying to kill Bart Simpson after getting out of jail. It is a spoof of the 1962 film Cape Fear as well as its 1991 remake, but alludes to other horror films. The production crew found it difficult to stretch "Cape Feare" in order to fulfil the standard length of a half-hour episode, leading to the padding of several scenes for which some became memorable. Simpsons redirects here. ... Promo card for Cape Feare. This work is copyrighted. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Al Jean is a TV comedy writer most known for his work on The Simpsons. ... Mike Reiss is an American TV comedy writer. ... Al Jean (left) and David Mirkin (right), have both been writers for The Simpsons for more than ten years. ... Vitti as portrayed in the episode of The Simpsons The Front. Jon Vitti is a writer who is most noted for his well-received scripts for the television series The Simpsons. ... The three people are caricatures of (left to right) Rich Moore, Wes Archer and David Silverman[1] The following is a list of directors who have worked on the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... Rich Moore is an animation director whose credits include The Simpsons, Futurama, Baby Blues, and The Critic. ... Bart writes The Pledge of Allegiance does not end with Hail Satan The chalkboard gag is a running visual joke that occurs during the opening credits of many episodes of The Simpsons. ... The couch gag is a running visual joke in the opening credits of the animated television series The Simpsons. ... (left to right) Elvis Costello, Tom Petty, Keith Richards, Homer, Mick Jagger, Lenny Kravitz and Brian Setzer guest starred in the heavily promoted season 14 episode How I Spent My Strummer Vacation. This is a list of guest stars who appeared on The Simpsons. ... Allen Kelsey Grammer (born February 21, 1955 in Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands) is a six-time Emmy and a two-time Golden Globe-winning American actor who is best known for his two-decade portrayal of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane, whom he played for nine years on Cheers... Robert Underdunk Terwilliger, better known by his stage name Sideshow Bob, is a recurring character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... The Simpsons DVD season boxsets have been released since 2001 in different regions all over the world. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Al Jean is a TV comedy writer most known for his work on The Simpsons. ... Vitti as portrayed in the episode of The Simpsons The Front. Jon Vitti is a writer who is most noted for his well-received scripts for the television series The Simpsons. ... The Simpsons Season 5 DVD Digipak. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Homers Barbershop Quartet is the first episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Rosebud is the fourth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Treehouse of Horror IV is the fifth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on October 28, 1993. ... Marge on the Lam is the sixth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Barts Inner Child is the seventh episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on November 11, 1993. ... Boy-Scoutz N the Hood is the eighth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... The Last Temptation of Homer is the ninth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling), also known as $pringfield, is the tenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Homer the Vigilante is the eleventh episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Bart Gets Famous is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which originally aired on February 3, 1994. ... Homer and Apu is the thirteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on February 10, 1994. ... Lisa vs. ... Deep Space Homer is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season and first aired on February 24, 1994. ... Homer Loves Flanders is the sixteenth episode from the fifth season of The Simpsons. ... Bart Gets an Elephant is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Burns Heir is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on April 14, 1994. ... Sweet Seymour Skinners Baadasssss Song is the nineteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on April 28, 1994. ... The Boy Who Knew Too Much is the 20th episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Lady Bouviers Lover is the twenty-first episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which originally aired on May 12, 1994. ... Secrets of a Successful Marriage is the 22nd and final episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... The following is an episode list for the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... The Simpsons Season 1 DVD Digipak. ... The Simpsons second season originally aired between October 1990 and July 1991, beginning on October 11, 1990. ... The Simpsons Season 3 DVD. The Simpsons 3rd season (September 1991 – May 1992) began on September 19, 1991. ... The Simpsons Season 4 Digipak The Simpsons fourth season originally aired between September 1992 and May 1993, beginning on September 24, 1992. ... The Simpsons Season 5 DVD Digipak. ... The standard Season 6 DVD box. ... The Simpsons Season 7 DVD Digipak. ... The Simpsons Season 8 DVD Digipak. ... The Simpsons Season 9 DVD Digipak. ... The Simpsons tenth season originally aired between August 1998 and May 1999, beginning on Sunday, August 23, 1998. ... The Simpsons 11th season (September 1999 - May 2000) began on Sunday, September 26, 1999 with Beyond Blunderdome. ... The Simpsons 12th season (November 2000 - May 2001) began on Sunday, November 1, 2000 with Treehouse of Horror XI. The season contains three hold-over episodes from the season 11 (BABF) production line. ... The Simpsons 13th season (November 2001 - May 2002) began on Tuesday, November 6, 2001 with Treehouse of Horror XII. The season contains five hold-over episodes from the season 12 (CABF) production line. ... The Simpsons 14th season (November 2002 - May 2003) began on Sunday, November 3, 2002 with Treehouse of Horror XIII. The season contains five hold-over episodes from the season 13 (DABF) production line. ... The Simpsons 15th season (November 2003 - May 2004) began on Sunday, November 2, 2003 with Treehouse of Horror XIV. The season contains five hold-over episodes from the season 14 (EABF) production line. ... The Simpsons 16th season (November 2004 - May 2005) began on Sunday, November 7, 2004 with Treehouse of Horror XV. The season contains six hold-over episodes from the season 15 (FABF) production line. ... The Simpsons celebrate Labor Day in this promotional artwork for the series 17th season. ... The Simpsons 18th season (2006 - 2007) began on Fox on September 10, 2006[1] and ended on May 20, 2007. ... The Simpsons 19th season (2007 - 2008) began airing on Fox on September 23, 2007. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The Simpsons Season 5 DVD Digipak. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Simpsons Season 4 Digipak The Simpsons fourth season originally aired between September 1992 and May 1993, beginning on September 24, 1992. ... Robert Underdunk Terwilliger, better known by his stage name Sideshow Bob, is a recurring character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson comics. ... Cape Fear is a 1962 film which tells the story of an attorney whose family is stalked by a criminal whom the attorney helped to send to jail. ... Cape Fear is a 1991 film, directed by Martin Scorsese. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ...


"Cape Feare" was written by Jon Vitti and directed by Rich Moore and was the last episode that the original writing staff helped produce.[1] Kelsey Grammer guest stars as Sideshow Bob.[1] The episode is generally rated as one of the best of the entire series and the score received an Emmy Award nomination. Vitti as portrayed in the episode of The Simpsons The Front. Jon Vitti is a writer who is most noted for his well-received scripts for the television series The Simpsons. ... Rich Moore is an animation director whose credits include The Simpsons, Futurama, Baby Blues, and The Critic. ... Allen Kelsey Grammer (born February 21, 1955 in Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands) is a six-time Emmy and a two-time Golden Globe-winning American actor who is best known for his two-decade portrayal of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane, whom he played for nine years on Cheers... An Emmy Award. ...

Contents

Plot

After receiving several death threats in the mail, Bart starts to become easily frightened. It is revealed that the writer is Bart's arch-enemy, Sideshow Bob, residing in Springfield State Prison. The next day, Sideshow Bob's parole hearing is held and Chief Wiggum and Selma give their testimonies, which Sideshow Bob's lawyer rebuffs. Sideshow Bob promises that he is no threat to Bart and is swiftly paroled. When the Simpson family goes to watch a film, Sideshow Bob sits in front of them. They then realize that it was he who sent the letters. Springfield is the fictional city where the TV series The Simpsons is set, founded by Jebediah Springfield, located near Shelbyville. ... Police Chief Clancy Wiggum is a fictional character from the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Hank Azaria. ... This article or section should be merged with Patty Bouvier Selma Bouvier (voiced by Julie Kavner) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons. ...


The Simpson family try to protect themselves from Sideshow Bob. Homer goes to a shady-looking vigilante, who promises to run Sideshow Bob out of town, but actually pleads with him and fails. The next day, Sideshow Bob goes around Evergreen Terrace in an ice-cream truck, calling out the names of all the people whom he will not kill, and Bart's name is not on that list. The Simpsons opt for the FBI's Witness Relocation Program and move to Terror Lake, with the new surname "Thompson" and a houseboat to live in. However, unbeknownst to the family as they drive (cross-country) to their new home, Sideshow Bob has strapped himself to the underside of the car. Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... In the United States, the Witness Protection Program (also known as WITSEC) is established by the Witness Protection Act, which in turn sets out the manner in which the U.S. Attorney General may provide for the relocation and protection of a witness or potential witness of the federal government...


After arriving at Terror Lake, the Simpsons go inside their new houseboat, and Sideshow Bob comes out from under the car. In doing so, he accidentally steps on the teeth of a number of rakes repeatedly, causing the rakes' handles to swing up and hit him in the face. As Bart later walks down the road, he hears Sideshow Bob's sinister voice and sees him extricate himself from the underside of another car. Bart runs home and warns his parents.


After nightfall, Sideshow Bob arrives on the houseboat and cuts it loose from the dock. After tying up the other family members, Bob grabs his knife and enters Bart's room. Bart escapes out the window and tries to hide from Sideshow Bob, but he cannot jump off the boat, as there are crocodiles and electric eels in the water. He sees that they are 15 miles from Springfield and as a last request, asks Sideshow Bob to sing the entire score to the H.M.S. Pinafore. After giving a stirring performance, Bob advances on Bart again, but the boat runs aground, and Sideshow Bob is apprehended by the police. He is taken away, and the Simpsons return home. Wikisource has original text related to this article: H.M.S. Pinafore H.M.S. Pinafore, or The Lass that Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ...


Production

Even though the episode aired during the beginning of the fifth season, it was produced by the crew of the fourth season.[3] A large part of the original crew left the show after season four to pursue new challenges.[3] This led to the addition of several scenes, which normally would not have been considered, because the mentality of the departing crew was "what are they going to do, get us fired?"[3] Although most of the episode was completed by the staff of season four, the end was rewritten by the team of season five.[4]


Wallace Wolodarsky had seen the 1991 version of Cape Fear and pitched the idea of making a spoof of the film.[4] Jon Vitti was then assigned to write a spoof of the original film from 1962 as well as the remake.[4] Instead of using the spoof as only a part of the episode, which could also have contained a B-story, the entire episode was devoted to this parody. Sideshow Bob was cast as the villain and Bart became the main victim. The episode followed the same basic plot outline as the films and used a pastiche of the score by Bernard Herrmann, which after this episode became Sideshow Bob's theme.[4] This episode marked the first time a Sideshow Bob episode was not a mystery.[3] Wallace Wolodarsky was a writer for the Simpsons during the first four seasons, all of his episodes were co-written with former writing partner Jay Kogen. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ...


Compared to previously produced episodes, this episode featured several elements that could be described as silly and cartoonish. This was a result of the staff's careless attitude towards the end of season four. Al Jean has compared Sideshow Bob to Wile E. Coyote, after he was stomped on by multiple elephants and bounced right back up.[4] Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote The Road Runner cartoons are a series of Looney Tunes cartoons created by Chuck Jones for Warner Brothers. ...

In the rake sequence, Sideshow Bob would step on nine rakes in a row in order to fill time.
In the rake sequence, Sideshow Bob would step on nine rakes in a row in order to fill time.

Additions to the end musical number, including visual gags such as Bob appearing in uniform, were added after the animatics, because the crew felt that watching the character singing would not be interesting enough and they had to include these gags to make it work.[4] Matt Groening was surprised when he saw the additions, because he thought that these silly gags would not appear in the final cut, but he does like them now.[5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Animatics are digital pre conceptions of scenes. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ...


There were difficulties getting this episode up to the minimum length of an episode and many scenes were added in post-production.[4] The episode starts with a repeat of a couch gag that was first used in the episode "Lisa's First Word", which is considerably longer than the typical couch gag. The crew added an Itchy & Scratchy cartoon and a few misleads as to who was trying to kill Bart.[4] Even with all of these additions, the episode still ran short of time. This led to the creation of the rake sequence, which became a memorable moment for this episode.[4] Originally, Sideshow Bob was only supposed to step on one rake after he stepped out from the underside of the Simpson family's car, but this was changed to nine rakes in a row.[4] The idea was to make it funny, then unfunny and later funny again.[4] The couch gag is a running visual joke in the opening credits of the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Lisas First Word is the 10th episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ... Itchy and Scratchy The Itchy & Scratchy Show is a fictional television cartoon show within the television cartoon show The Simpsons (see show-within-a-show). ... A heavy-duty rake for soil and rocks A light-duty rake for grass and leaves A double-sided rake A Rake better known as Kiran Buckman in various parts of Australia (Old English raca, cognate with Dutch raak, German Rechen, from a root meaning to scrape together, heap up...


Kelsey Grammer was brought in to guest star as Sideshow Bob for the third time.[1] At that time Grammer had become a household name as the lead of the television series Frasier, which was in production at the same time as this episode.[4] Grammer did not know that the rake scene was extended, because he had only done the moan once and was surprised when he saw the final product.[4] Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ...


Cultural references

Besides borrowing the overall plot structure of the Cape Fear films, the episode made several direct references to specific scenes from the films, including: Marge going to Chief Wiggum only to be told that Sideshow Bob has not broken any laws, Sideshow Bob getting out of prison, the scene in the movie theatre, and Sideshow Bob hiding under the Simpson family's car, which was a reference to the 1991 remake.[4] The episode also contains elements of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho with Sideshow Bob staying at Bates Motel.[1] Homer surprising Bart with his new hockey mask recalls the film Friday the 13th Part 3[2] and Sideshow Bob's tattoos on his knuckles are similar to those of Robert Mitchum's character in The Night of the Hunter (Mitchum also played the villain, Max Cady, in the original 1962 movie of "Cape Fear").[6] Homer's hat and singing of "Three Little Maids From School Are We" from The Mikado during the car trip to Terror Lake alludes to I Love Lucy.[4] Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... Friday the 13th Part 3: 3D is the second sequel to Friday the 13th. ... Robert Charles Durman Mitchum (August 6, 1917 – July 1, 1997) was an Academy award nominated American film actor and singer. ... The Night of the Hunter is a 1953 novel by American author, Davis Grubb. ... Robert Mitchum as Max Cady in Cape Fear Robert DeNiro as Max Cady in the 1991 remake. ... The Mikado, or The Town of Titipu, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert, their ninth of fourteen operatic collaborations. ... I Love Lucy is a television situation comedy, starring Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball, also featuring Vivian Vance and William Frawley. ...


Reception

This episode is generally regarded as one of the best episodes of The Simpsons, and according to Matt Groening, people often include this episode among their top 10 favorites.[5] In Entertainment Weekly's top 25 The Simpsons episodes ever, it was placed third.[7] In 2003, to celebrate the show's 300th episode "Barting Over", USA Today published a top 10 chosen by the webmaster of The Simpsons Archive, which had this episode at a ninth place.[8] In 2006, IGN.com named Cape Feare the best episode of the fifth season.[9] Vanity Fair called it the show's fourth best episode in 2007, as "this episode's masterful integration of filmic parody and a recurring character puts it near the top."[10] Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Barting Over is an episode of The Simpsons advertised by FOX to be the 300th episode of the show. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Simpsons Archive (www. ... IGN is the oldest and most visited general gaming website, and runs one of the most popular forums on the Internet. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ...


The musical score for this episode earned composer Alf Clausen an Emmy Award nomination for "Outstanding Dramatic Underscore - Series" in 1994.[11] Kelsey Grammer's performance of H.M.S. Pinafore was later included on the album Go Simpsonic with The Simpsons.[12] Alf Clausen (born March 28, 1941) composes music for television and film. ... An Emmy Award. ... Go Simpsonic with The Simpsons is the 1999 soundtrack album from The Simpsons. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Richmond, Ray; Antonia Coffman (1997). The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to our Favorite Family. Harper Collins Publishers, p. 121. ISBN 0-00-638898-1. 
  2. ^ a b Martyn, Warren; Wood, Adrian (2000). Cape Feare. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-02-12.
  3. ^ a b c d Vitti, Jon. (2004). The Simpsons season 5 DVD commentary for the episode "Cape Feare" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Jean, Al. (2004). The Simpsons season 5 DVD commentary for the episode "Cape Feare" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  5. ^ a b Groening, Matt. (2004). The Simpsons season 5 DVD commentary for the episode "Cape Feare" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  6. ^ The Night Of The Hunter. The Greatest Films. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  7. ^ The Family Dynamic. Entertainment Weekly (2003-01-29). Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  8. ^ Paakkinen, Jouni (2003-02-06). 10 fan favorites. USA Today. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  9. ^ Goldman, Eric; Dan Iverson, Brian Zoromski (2006-09-08). The Simpsons: 17 Seasons, 17 Episodes. IGN.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-01.
  10. ^ John Orvted. "Springfield's Best", Vanity Fair, 2007-07-05. Retrieved on 2007-07-13. 
  11. ^ Every show, every winner, every nominee. The Envelope. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  12. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Go Simpsonic with the Simpsons. allmusic.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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'Cape Fear' (1020 words)
What's puzzling about "Cape Fear," though, is why, at this stage of his career, Scorsese would set his sights so low.
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