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Encyclopedia > Cao Pi
(Cao) Wei Wendi ((曹)魏文帝)
Family name: Cao (曹; cáo)
Given name: Pi (丕, pī)
Temple name: Gaozu (高祖, gāozǔ)
Posthumous name: Wen (文, wén)
literary meaning: "civil"

Cáo Pī (曹丕, 187-June 29, 226[1]), formally Emperor Wen of (Cao) Wei (曹魏文帝), courtesy name Zihuan (子桓), was born in Qiao County, Pei Commandery (modern Bozhou, Anhui). He was the second son of the Chinese politician and poet Cao Cao and was the first emperor and the real founder of Cao Wei (also known as "Kingdom of Wei") (see Three Kingdoms). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 388 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (405 × 625 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cao Pi ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The letters CAO are used to denote several things: Central Applications Office - Irish organisation that oversees tertiary education applications Chief Administrative Officer of a company Chief Accounting Officer of a company Collectieve Arbeids Overeenkomst (Collective Work Agreement), Dutch term for a collective employment contract framework Computer Aided Optimization Computer Assisted... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Temple names (Traditional Chinese: 廟號 Simplified Chinese: 庙号 Pinyin: miào hào;), are commonly used when naming most Chinese, Vietnamese (such dynasties as Tran,Anterior Lê and Nguyen Dynasty) and most Korean rulers of the Goryeo and Joseon Dynasties. ... A posthumous name (Traditional Chinese: 諡號/謚號 Simplified Chinese: 谥号; Pinyin: shì hào; Romaji: shigō/tsuigō; Revised Romanization of Korean: siho) is a honorary name given to royalty in some cultures posthumously, that is, after the persons death. ... Events Rebellion of Zhang Chun and Zhang Ju. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events: Accession of Wei Mingdi as emperor of the Kingdom of Wei of China. ... Cha can also refer to a Latin American dance, also called the Cha-cha-cha. ... Bozhou (亳州; pinyin: Bózhōu) is a city in northwestern Anhui, China (Bozhou_shi). ... Anhui (Chinese: 安徽; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: An-hui; Postal System Pinyin: Ngan-hui, Anhwei or An-hwei) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Cáo Cāo (155 – March 15, 220, pronounced Tsau Tsau) was a regional warlord and the second last Chancellor of the Eastern Han Dynasty who rose to great power during its final years in ancient China. ... For the volcano in Indonesia, see Emperor of China (volcano). ... The territories of Cao Wei (in yellow), AD 262 Capital Luoyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 220 - 226 Cao Pi  - 226 - 239 Cao Rui  - 239 - 254 Cao Fang  - 254 - 260 Cao Mao  - 260 - 265 Cao Huan Historical era Three Kingdoms  - Cao Pi taking over the throne of the Later... The Three Kingdoms period (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a period in the history of China, part of an era of disunity called the Six Dynasties. ...


Cao Pi, like his father, was a poet. The first Chinese poem using seven syllables per line (七言詩) was the poem 燕歌行 by Cao Pi. He also wrote over a hundred articles on various subjects. Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong Hand-painted Chinese New Years duilian (對聯 couplet), a by-product of Chinese poetry, pasted on the sides of doors leading to peoples homes, at Lijiang City, Yunnan Poetry is the most highly regarded literary genre in ancient China. ...


Cao Pi was the eldest son of Cao Cao and his concubine (later wife) Princess Bian. Of all his brothers, Cao Pi was the most shrewd. Instead of studying hard or conducting military affairs, he was always in the presence of court officials in order to gain their support. He was mostly in charge of defense at the start of his career. After the defeat of Yuan Shao at Guandu, he took the widow of Yuan Shao's son Yuan Xi, Lady Zhen, as a consort, although eventually she lost his favor and was forced to commit suicide. After he became emperor, his other favorite, Guo Nüwang, became empress. Empress Dowager Bian (卞太后, personal name unknown) (d. ... Yuan Shao (? – 202) was a major warlord occupying the north of ancient China during the massive civil war towards the end of the Eastern Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms era. ... The Battle of Guandu (官渡之戰) was a battle in Chinese history. ... Yuán XÄ« (Chinese: ; pinyin: yuán xÄ«) (176 – 207) was the second son of the warlord Yuán Shào and a military general under his father during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... Zhen Luo (甄宓;甄洛) (d. ... Empress Guo Nüwang (郭嬛) (d. ...


In 220, Cao Pi forced Emperor Xian to abdicate the throne and proclaimed himself emperor of Wei. Cao Pi continued his father's war against Liu Bei's Shu Han and Sun Quan's Eastern Wu but was unsuccessful. Unlike Cao Cao he concentrated most of his efforts on his home country, which prospered under his rule. Events Han Xiandi abdicates his throne to Cao Pi, symbolizing the end of the Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... Format of naming convention in English is under discussion at Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese). ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is 劉 (Liu) Liú Bèi (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (161 – 223), courtesy name Xuándé (玄徳), was a powerful warlord and the founding emperor of the Kingdom of Shu during the Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... The Kingdom of Shu (蜀 shǔ) (221 – 263) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... Sun Quan (孫權 pinyin: SÅ«n Quán) (182 - 252), son of Sun Jian, was the third ruler of the State of Wu and the founder of Kingdom of Wu, during the Three Kingdoms period, in China. ... The territories of Eastern Wu (in green), AD 262 Capital Jianye Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 222 - 252 Sun Quan  - 252 - 258 Sun Liang  - 258 - 264 Sun Xiu  - 264 - 280 Sun Hao Historical era Three Kingdoms  - Establishment 222  - Sun Quan declares himself emperor 229  - Conquest of Wu by Jin...


There were many internal conflicts during Cao Pi's rule. He demoted his brother Cao Zhi (who had contended with him the status as Cao Cao's heir) and had two of Cao Zhi's best friends executed. Allegedly, his younger brother Cao Xiong committed suicide out of fears for his brother, although this was undocumented in actual historical records. Cao Pi also put Yu Jin to shame for his loss to Guan Yu, which caused him to become ill and die. He further restricted the roles his other brothers had in the imperial administration; in addition, unlike princes of the Han Dynasty, under regulations established by Cao Pi, Cao Wei princes had minimal authority even in their own principalities and were restricted in many ways. Many historians attribute these heavy restrictions to how Cao Pi was jealous of Cao Zhi's literary talent and Cao Zhang's military might. Cao Zhi (曹植 192 – 232) was a Chinese poet during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period. ... Cao Xiong was the son of the powerful warlord Cao Cao, and lived during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and the Three Kingdoms period. ... Yu Jin (? – 220) was a military general under the powerful warlord Cao Cao during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Guan (é—œ) Guan Yu (關羽) (160–219) was a general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of China. ... Cao Zhang (曹彰; styled Ziwen 子文) was a son of Cao Cao and a general of the Wei during the Three Kingdoms period in China. ...

Contents

Family background and early career

Cao Pi was born in 187, to Cao Cao and one of his favorite concubines, Lady Bian. At the time of Cao Pi's birth, Cao Cao was a mid-level officer in the imperial guards in the capital Luoyang, with no hint that he would go on to the great campaigns that he would eventually carry out after the collapse of the imperial government in 190. After 190, when Cao Cao was constantly waging war, it is not known where Cao Pi and his mother Lady Bian were, or what their activities were. The lone reference to Cao Pi during this period was in 204, when he took Yuan Xi's wife Zhen Luo as his wife. (Lady Zhen gave birth to Cao Pi's oldest son Cao Rui only eight months later -- which created murmurs that Cao Rui might have been biologically Yuan Xi's son and not Cao Pi's, although the possibilities appeared farfetched.) Luoyang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Events A part of Rome burns, and emperor Commodus orders the city to be rebuilt under the name Colonia Commodiana First year of Chuping era of Chinese Han Dynasty Births 190 is a number Deaths Athenagoras of Athens, Christian apologist Categories: 190 ... Events Births Philip the Arab, Roman Emperor (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 204 ... Yuán Xī (Chinese: ; pinyin: yuán xī) (176 – 207) was the second son of the warlord Yuán Shào and a military general under his father during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... Zhen Luo (甄宓;甄洛) (d. ... Cao Rui, ch. ...


The immediate next reference to Cao Pi's activities was in 211, when he was commissioned to be the commander of the imperial guards and deputy prime minister (i.e., assistant to his father, who was then prime minister and in effective control of the imperial government). His older brother Cao Ang having died earlier, Cao Pi was now the oldest son of Cao Cao, and his mother Lady Bian was now Cao Cao's wife (after Cao Ang's adoptive mother, Cao Cao's first wife Lady Ding, was deposed), making Cao Pi the presumptive heir for Cao Cao. This article is about the year 211. ... Cao Ang (175 – 197) was the eldest son of the powerful warlord Cao Cao during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. ...


That status, however, was not immediately made legal, and for years there were lingering doubts whom Cao Cao intended to make heir, because Cao Cao greatly favored a younger son of his, also by Lady Bian -- Cao Zhi, who was known for his literary talents; while Cao Pi was a talented poet, Cao Zhi was even higher regarded as a poet and speaker. By 215, the brothers were on the surface in concord but each having his set of associates, fighting with each other under the surface. Initially, Cao Zhi's party appeared to be prevailing, and they were successful in 216 in falsely accusing two officials supporting Cao Pi -- Cui Yan (崔琰) and Mao Jie (毛玠). Cui was executed, while Mao was deposed. However, the situation shifted after Cao Cao received advice from his strategist Jia Xu, who concluded that changing the general rules of succession (primogeniture) would be disruptive -- using Yuan Shao and Liu Biao as counterexamples. Cao Pi was also fostering his image among the people and creating the sense that Cao Zhi was wasteful and lacking actual talent in governance. In 217, Cao Cao, who was by this point Prince of Wei, finally declared Cao Pi as his crown prince. He would remain as such until his father's death in 220. Events Caracallas Roman troops massacre the population of Alexandria, Egypt. ... Events The Baths of Caracalla in Britain is divided into Britannia Superior and Britannia Inferior. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction, this article may require cleanup. ... Jia Xu (147 - 224 AD) was an advisor to the Wei Kingdom. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Yuan Shao (? – 202) was a major warlord occupying the north of ancient China during the massive civil war towards the end of the Eastern Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms era. ... Liú BiÇŽo (劉表 142 – 208) was the governor of the Jing province in China towards the end of the Han Dynasty. ... Events Macrinus becomes Roman Emperor on the death of Caracalla. ... Events Han Xiandi abdicates his throne to Cao Pi, symbolizing the end of the Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms period in China. ...


Events of 220: inheritance of his father's position and seizure of the imperial throne

Cao Pi ascending the imperial throne in the 84-episode TV serial Romance of the Three Kingdoms
Cao Pi ascending the imperial throne in the 84-episode TV serial Romance of the Three Kingdoms

Cao Cao died in spring 220, while he was at Luoyang. Even though Cao Pi had been crown prince for several years, there was initially some confusion as to what would happen next. The apprehension was particularly heightened when, after Cao Cao's death, the Qing Province (青州, modern central and eastern Shandong) troops suddenly deserted, leaving Luoyang and returning home. Further, Cao Zhang, whom the troops were impressed by, quickly arrived in Luoyang, creating apprehension that he was intending to seize power from his brother. Cao Pi, hearing these news at Cao Cao's headquarters at Yecheng, quickly declared himself the new Prince of Wei and issuing an edict in the name of his mother, Princess Bian, to that effect -- without confirmation from Emperor Xian of Han, of whom he was still technically a subject. After Cao Pi's self-declaration, neither Cao Zhang nor any other individual dared to act against him. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In 1995, Central Chinese Television(CCTV) produced a adaptation of the novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms. ... Luoyang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-tung) is a coastal province of eastern Peoples Republic of China. ... Cao Zhang (曹彰; styled Ziwen 子文) was a son of Cao Cao and a general of the Wei during the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... Ye was a city in ancient China. ... Emperor Xian of Han, trad. ...


One of the first acts that Cao Pi carried out as Prince of Wei was to send his brothers, including Cao Zhang and Cao Zhi, back to their marches. Cao Pi, particularly fearful and resentful at Cao Zhi, soon had his march reduced in size and killed a number of his associates, including Ding Yi, who was chief among Cao Zhi's strategists. Mark or march (or various plural forms of these words) are derived from the Frankish word marka (boundary) and refer to a border region, e. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


In winter 220, Cao Pi finally made his move for the imperial throne, strongly suggesting to Emperor Xian that he should yield the throne. Emperor Xian did so, and Cao Pi formally declined three times (a model that would be followed by future usurpers in Chinese history), and then finally accepted, ending Han Dynasty and starting a new Wei Dynasty. The former Emperor Xian was created the Duke of Shanyang. Cao Pi posthumously honored his grandfather Cao Song and father Cao Cao as emperors, and his mother Princess Dowager Bian as empress dowager. He also moved his capital from Xu (許縣, in modern Xuchang, Henan) to Luoyang. Cao Song was the father of Cao Cao. ... Empress Dowager (Chinese, Korean and Japanese: 皇太后; Chinese pinyin Húang Tài Hòu, Korean pronunciation: Hwang Tae Hu, Japanese pronunciation: Kōtaigō) was title given to the mother of a Chinese emperor. ... Xuchang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in central Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ...


As emperor of Cao Wei

Failure to take advantage of the conflict between Liu Bei and Sun Quan

A 7th century Tang Dynasty era painting of Cao Pi and ministers at his side, by Yan Liben (600-673).
A 7th century Tang Dynasty era painting of Cao Pi and ministers at his side, by Yan Liben (600-673).

After news of Cao Pi's ascension (and an accompanying false rumor that Cao had executed Emperor Xian) arrived in Liu Bei's domain of Yi Province (益州, modern Sichuan and Chongqing), Liu Bei declared himself emperor as well, establishing Shu Han. Sun Quan, who controlled the vast majority of modern southeastern and southern China, did not take any affirmative steps one way or another, leaving his options open. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 387 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (438 × 678 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission See below. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 387 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (438 × 678 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission See below. ... China under the Tang Dynasty (yellow) and its sphere of influence Capital Changan (618–904) Luoyang (904-907) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 618-626 Emperor Gaozu  - 684, 705-710 Emperor Zhongzong  - 684, 710-712 Emperor Ruizong  - 904-907 Emperor Ai History  - Li Yuan... Yan Liben ( 600 - 673) was a Chinese painter and government official of the early Tang Dynasty. ... The population of the Earth rises to about 208 million people. ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: SzÅ­4-chuan1; Postal map spelling: Szechwan and Szechuan) is a province in the central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... Chongqing (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Chungching, also Chungking) is the largest and most populous of the Peoples Republic of Chinas four provincial-level municipalities, and the only one in the less densely populated western half of China. ... The Kingdom of Shu (蜀 shǔ) (221 – 263) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ...


An armed conflict between Liu and Sun quickly developed, because in 219 Sun had ambushed Liu's general and beloved friend Guan Yu to seize back western Jing Province (荊州, modern Hubei and Hunan), which Liu had controlled, and Liu wanted to take vengeance. To avoid having to fight on two fronts, Sun formally paid allegiance to Cao, offering to be a vassal of Cao Wei. Cao's strategist Liu Ye (劉曄) suggested that Cao decline -- and in fact attack Sun on a second front, effectively partitioning Sun's domain with Shu Han, and then eventually seek to destroy Shu Han as well. Cao declined, in a fateful choice that most historians believe doomed his empire to ruling only the northern and central China -- and this chance would not come again. Indeed, against Liu Ye's advice, he created Sun the Prince of Wu and granted him the nine bestowments. Events Legio III Gallica and IV Scythica are disbanded by Roman Emperor Elagabalus after their leaders, Verus and Gellius Maximus, rebel. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Guan (é—œ) Guan Yu (關羽) (160–219) was a general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of China. ... Hubei (Chinese: 湖北; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hu-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hupeh) is a central province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a province of China, located in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River and south of Lake Dongting (hence the name Hunan, meaning south of the lake). Hunan is sometimes called 湘 (pinyin: Xiāng) for short, after the Xiang River which runs through the province. ... The nine bestowments (九錫) were awards given by Chinese emperors to extraordinary officials, ostensibly to reward them for their accomplishments. ...


Sun's submission did not last long, however. After Sun's forces, under the command of Lu Xun, defeated Liu Bei's forces in 222, Sun began to distance himself from Cao Wei. When Cao demanded Sun to send his heir Sun Deng (孫登) to Luoyang as hostage and Sun refused, formal relations broke down. Cao personally led an expedition against Sun, and Sun, in response, declared independence from Cao Wei, establishing Eastern Wu. By this time, having defeated Liu, Eastern Wu's forces enjoyed high morale and effective leadership from Sun, Lu, and a number of other capable generals, and Cao's forces were not able to make significant advances against them despite several large-scale attacks in the next few years. The division of the Han empire into three states has become firmly established, particularly after Liu Bei's death in 223; his prime minister Zhuge Liang, serving as regent for his son Liu Shan, reestablished the alliance with Sun, causing Cao Wei to have to defend itself on two fronts and not being able to conquer either. Exasperated, Cao made a famous comment in 225 that "Heaven created the Yangtze to divide the north and the south." Lu Xun (Traditional Chinese: 陸遜; Simplified Chinese: 陆逊; Pinyin: Lù Xùn) (183 – 245), originally named Lu Yi (陸議/陆議), was a general of the Kingdom of Wu during the Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... The territories of Eastern Wu (in green), AD 262 Capital Jianye Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 222 - 252 Sun Quan  - 252 - 258 Sun Liang  - 258 - 264 Sun Xiu  - 264 - 280 Sun Hao Historical era Three Kingdoms  - Establishment 222  - Sun Quan declares himself emperor 229  - Conquest of Wu by Jin... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhuge (諸葛) Zhuge Liang (181 - 234) was one of the greatest Chinese strategists of the Three Kingdoms period, as well as a statesman, engineer, scholar, and inventor. ... Liu Shan, (commonly mispronounced as Liu Chan[1]), (207 – 271) was the second and last emperor of the Kingdom of Shu during the Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ...


Domestic matters

Cao Pi was generally viewed as a competent, but unspectacular, administrator of his empire. He commissioned a number of capable officials to be in charge of various affairs of the empire, employing his father's general guidelines of valuing abilities over heritage. However, he was not open to criticism, and officials who dared to cricitize him were often demoted and, on rare occasions, put to death.


Marriage and succession issues

An immediate issue after Cao Pi became emperor in 220 was who the empress would be. Lady Zhen was his wife, but had by this point long lost favor due to a variety of reasons -- chief among which was the struggle she had with a favorite concubine of Cao's, Guo Nüwang. Lady Guo used the unlikely possibility that Zhen's son Cao Rui might be biologically Yuan Xi's son to full advantage in creating conflicts between Cao Pi and Lady Zhen. Cao therefore refused to summon Lady Zhen to Luoyang after he ascended the throne but instead ordered her to remain at Yecheng, which caused Lady Zhen to be resentful. When words of her resentment reached Cao, he became angry and forced her to commit suicide. In 222, Cao created Consort Guo empress. Empress Guo Nüwang (郭嬛) (d. ...


Empress Guo, however, was sonless. Lady Zhen's son Cao Rui was the oldest of Cao Pi's sons, but because she had been put to death and because of Cao Pi's lingering doubt as to his paternity, was not created crown prince but only the Prince of Pingyuan after Cao Pi's ascension. Cao Pi, however, did not appear to have seriously considered any other son as heir. (It might have been because the other sons were all significantly younger, although their ages were not recorded in history.) In the summer of 226, when Cao Pi was seriously ill, he finally created Prince Rui crown prince. He died soon thereafter, and Prince Rui ascended the throne. Events: Accession of Wei Mingdi as emperor of the Kingdom of Wei of China. ...


Era name

  • Huangchu (黃初; py. huáng chū) 220-226

Events Han Xiandi abdicates his throne to Cao Pi, symbolizing the end of the Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... Events: Accession of Wei Mingdi as emperor of the Kingdom of Wei of China. ...

Modern references

Cao Pi, as he appears in Dynasty Warriors 5.

Cao Pi appears in the Koei video game Dynasty Warriors 5, the latest in the Romance of the Three Kingdoms-based franchise. Whilst several characters have been portrayed as corrupt, megalomanical, arrogant and merciless, none before the introduction of Cao Pi have been portrayed as inherently evil. Cao Pi is arguably the most cold, calculating and ruthless character to appear so far amongst the fifty unique historical figures featured in the series, even going so far as to label his own father, Cao Cao, as a small and foolish man with narrow ambitions. Cao Pi wields a double-ended, detachable pole blade called the "Chaos," fighting wth a direct and aggressive style of sword play. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (648x1000, 262 KB) Cao Pi, second son of Cao Cao and ruler of the Kingdom of Wei. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (648x1000, 262 KB) Cao Pi, second son of Cao Cao and ruler of the Kingdom of Wei. ... Dynasty Warriors 5 (真・三國無双4) is a beat em up video game set in China and the fifth installment in the Dynasty Warriors series, developed by Omega Force and published by Koei, the game was released on the PlayStation 2 and Xbox. ... Koeis Current Company Logo Koei Co. ... Dynasty Warriors 5 (真・三國無双4) is a beat em up video game set in China and the fifth installment in the Dynasty Warriors series, developed by Omega Force and published by Koei, the game was released on the PlayStation 2 and Xbox. ... Cáo Cāo (155 – March 15, 220, pronounced Tsau Tsau) was a regional warlord and the second last Chancellor of the Eastern Han Dynasty who rose to great power during its final years in ancient China. ...


Whilst many characters insult or demean their opponents, Cao Pi will barely acknowledge their existence, doing so only long enough to kill them. Cao's "Musou Mode" (story mode) revolves around his desire to remove himself from his father's shadow and prove himself a greater man by conquering the land and defeating those that his father could not. During the Battle of Guan Du, he meets Zhen Ji, and immediately wishes to make her his own. She complies, but only after Cao defeats her in battle to prove himself worthy. However despite his cold nature, he does genuinely love her and at times suggests that he sees her as a worthy match for him. Even so, this is ironic considering the historical Cao Pi would eventually order Lady Zhen's suicide. During Cao's ending sequence, while conversing with Sima Yi, Cao subtley mentions to Sima that he is aware of Sima'a plot to usurp the throne from his family, to which Sima replies with feigned confusion. Cao then informs Sima that, as China's rulers, they have the ability to help the country prosper by governing with virtue. That being said, Cao informs Sima that, if he still wishes to carry out his coup, he asks only that Sima wait until he is gone, displaying complete apathy for the Cao Family's future beyond his own rule. Of course, the Sima family follows this plan after Cao Pi is gone. Like several other characters in the series, Cao Pi's name is pronounced incorrectly. Characters in Dynasty Warriors pronounce his name as "Cow Pee," rather than the actual pronunciation "Tsao Pi." The Battle of Guandu (官渡之戰) was a battle in Chinese history. ... Zhen Ji (甄姫) (or Queen Zhen 甄后, Queen Wen Zhao of Wei 魏文昭皇后(which means Queen of Brightness of Wei, Wen 文 is refering Cao Pi, as Emperor Wen), for official records) Lady Zhen was a minor character in Romance of the Three Kingdoms novel. ... Sima Yi (179 - 251) was a general, military strategist, and politician of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ...


Personal information

  • Father
  • Mother
  • Wife
  • Major Concubines
    • Consort Li
    • Consort Yin, mother of Prince Xie
    • Consort Liu, daughter of Emperor Xian of Han
    • Consort Liu, daughter of Emperor Xian of Han (two daughters of Emperor Xian were Cao Pi's consorts, Liu being Emperor Xian's family name)
    • Consort Pan, mother of Prince Ruí
    • Consort Zhu, mother of Prince Jian
    • Consort Chou, mother of Prince Lin
    • Consort Xu, mother of Prince Li
    • Consort Su, mother of Prince Yong
    • Consort Zhang, mother of Prince Gong
    • Consort Song, mother of Prince Yan
  • Children
    • Cao Ruì (曹叡), initially Prince of Pingyuan (created 222), later Crown Prince (created 226), later Emperor Ming of (Cao) Wei
    • Cao Xie (曹協), died early (unclear when), posthumously created Duke Sang of Jing (231) then Prince Ai of Zan (234)
    • Cao Ruí (note different tone than Emperor Ming) (曹蕤), initially the Prince of Yangping (created 226), later Prince Dao of Beihai (created 232, d. 233)
    • Cao Jian (曹鑒), Prince Huai of Dongwuyang (created and d. 225)
    • Cao Lin (曹霖), initially the Prince of Hedong (created 222), later the Prince of Guantao (created 225), later Prince Ding of Donghai (created 232, d. 249), father of Cao Mao
    • Cao Li (曹禮), initially the Duke of Qin (created 221), later the Prince of Jingzhao (created 222), later Prince Ai of Yuancheng (created 225, d. 229)
    • Cao Yong (曹邕), initially the Duke of Huainan (created 221), later the Prince of Huainan (created 222), later the Prince of Chen (created 223), later Prince Huai of Handan (created 225, d. 229)
    • Cao Gong (曹貢), Prince Dao of Qinghe (created 222, d. 223)
    • Cao Yan (曹儼), Prince Ai of Guangping (created 222, d. 223)
    • Princess Dongxiang

Cáo Cāo (155 – March 15, 220, pronounced Tsau Tsau) was a regional warlord and the second last Chancellor of the Eastern Han Dynasty who rose to great power during its final years in ancient China. ... Empress Dowager Bian (卞太后, personal name unknown) (d. ... Zhen Luo (甄宓;甄洛) (d. ... Cao Rui, ch. ... Events June 26 - Roman Emperor Elagabalus adopts Alexander Severus as his heir. ... Empress Guo Nüwang (郭嬛) (d. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Events Maximinus Thrax becomes Roman Emperor. ... A swampy marsh area ... Emperor Xian of Han, trad. ... Emperor Xian of Han, trad. ... Cao Rui, ch. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Events: Accession of Wei Mingdi as emperor of the Kingdom of Wei of China. ... Events Births Cao Fang, emperor of the Kingdom of Wei (approximate date) Deaths Zhang He, general of the Wei Kingdom Categories: 231 ... Events Wei Yan revolts against the kingdom of Shu Han Births Emperor Wu of Jin China (approximate date) Deaths Li Yan, general of the Shu Kingdom Wei Yan, Shu general, executed by Ma Dai Zhuge Liang of the Shu Kingdom in China, dies on the Wu Zhang Plains in a... Events: Accession of Wei Mingdi as emperor of the Kingdom of Wei of China. ... Events Relics of St. ... Events Roman Emperor Alexander Severus wins a war against the Persians. ... Events Zhuge Liang pacifies Nan Zhong Births January 20 - Gordian III, Roman emperor Deaths Categories: 225 ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Events Zhuge Liang pacifies Nan Zhong Births January 20 - Gordian III, Roman emperor Deaths Categories: 225 ... Events Relics of St. ... Events Trajan Decius becomes Roman emperor. ... Cao Mao, ch. ... Events June 26 - Roman Emperor Elagabalus adopts Alexander Severus as his heir. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Events Zhuge Liang pacifies Nan Zhong Births January 20 - Gordian III, Roman emperor Deaths Categories: 225 ... Events Foundation of Jiankang (Nanjing) Sun Quan formally declares himself Emperor of Wu Births Deaths Dio Cassius (approximate date) Categories: 229 ... Events June 26 - Roman Emperor Elagabalus adopts Alexander Severus as his heir. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Liu Shan becomes second emperor of Shu-Han upon the death of his father, Liu Bei. ... Events Zhuge Liang pacifies Nan Zhong Births January 20 - Gordian III, Roman emperor Deaths Categories: 225 ... Events Foundation of Jiankang (Nanjing) Sun Quan formally declares himself Emperor of Wu Births Deaths Dio Cassius (approximate date) Categories: 229 ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Liu Shan becomes second emperor of Shu-Han upon the death of his father, Liu Bei. ... Events Pope Urban I succeeds Pope Callixtus I Roman Emperor Alexander Severus succeeds Heliogabalus Kingdom of Wu is established in China Sun Quan defeats Liu Bei at the Battle of Yi Ling Deaths March 11 - Roman Emperor Heliogabalus murdered Tertullian, theologian Pope Callixtus I Claudius Aelianus, teacher and rhetorician Ma... Liu Shan becomes second emperor of Shu-Han upon the death of his father, Liu Bei. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.sinica.edu.tw/ftms-bin/kiwi1/luso.sh?lstype=2&dyna=%ABe%C3Q&king=%A4%E5%AB%D2&reign=%B6%C0%AA%EC&yy=7&ycanzi=&mm=5&dd=&dcanzi=%A4B%A4x

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cao Pi
Preceded by
None (dynasty founded)
Emperor of Cao Wei
220226
Succeeded by
Cao Rui (Emperor Ming)
Preceded by
Emperor Xian of Han
Emperor of China (Northern)
220226

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cao Pi, Cao Zhang and Cao Zhi (454 words)
Cao Pi, Cao Zhang and Cao Zhi were born of the same mother, Bian Hou the Queen.
Cao Cao once held on to Zhang's beard and said, 'My son of yellow beard is simply amasing!' When Cao Pi became king in 220 A.D., Cao Zhang was awarded the Duke of Jin.
Pi would pick the unmarked ones that were safe to eat and leave the rest to his brother.
Cao Zhi (440 words)
Cao Zhi demonstrated his spontaneous wit[?] at an early age and was a front-running candidate of the throne; however, such ability was devoted to Chinese literature and poetry, which was encouraged by his father's subordinate officials.
Cao Zhi eventually lost the favour of his father and was demoted after Cao Pi's accession to an estate in Linzi Commandry[?] in modern Shandong province, where he spent the rest of his life as a recluse[?].
This is a metaphor in which Cao Zhi (represented by the beans) crtiticises why Cao Pi (the stalks) hurried to torture him despite both brothers being from the same parents.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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