FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Canterbury" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Canterbury

Coordinates: 51.276682° N 1.074761° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Canterbury
Statistics
Population: 42,259 (2001)
Location
OS grid reference: TR145575
Latitude: 51.276682°
Longitude: 1.074761°
Administration
District: City of Canterbury
Shire county: Kent
Region: South East England
Constituent country: England
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Ceremonial county: Kent
Historic county: Kent
Services
Police force: Kent Police
Fire and rescue: Kent
Ambulance: South East Coast
Post office and telephone
Post town: CANTERBURY
Postal district: CT1, CT2
Dialling code: 01227
Politics
UK Parliament: Canterbury
European Parliament: South East England

Canterbury [ˈkæntəˌbɹi] is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... Longitude, sometimes denoted by the Greek letter λ (lambda),[1][2] describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase sometimes used, usually by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia (example here) and European institutions such as the Council of Europe... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Kent Police is the police force covering Kent in England, including the unitary authority of Medway. ... A fire engine belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Kent Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the county of Kent covering a geographical area south of London, to the coast and including major shipping routes via the Thames and Medway rivers. ... This is a list of ambulance services in the United Kingdom: Ambulance services in England, after July 1, 2006 are A few deviations from the above have been made for operational reasons. ... As of 1st July the NHS Ambulance Services Trusts of Kent, Surrey and Sussex are being joined together to form a new South East Coast Ambulance Service . ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK postal system runs on a system of alphanumeric codes, or postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Canterbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOOMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooOOOOOOOO ... South East England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... The Fountain of Life in front of the city hall Cathedral City is a city located in Riverside County, California. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ...

Contents

History

Prehistoric and Roman history

There has been a settlement in Canterbury since prehistoric times. Bronze Age finds, and Neolithic round barrows have been discovered in the area; and before the Roman arrival Durovernon (British duro "fort", verno "swamp") was the most important settlement in Kent. my dick is to long Durovernum Cantiacorum was a town in the Roman province of Britannia. ... Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ...


Canterbury (known in Latin as Durovernum Cantiacorum) became a Roman administrative centre: it lay at the junction of three roads from their ports of Regulbium (Reculver), Dubris (Dover) and Lemanis (Lympne); and it stood on what has become known as Watling Street. The city walls and one of the city gates remain. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Reculver is a summer resort situated about 3 miles east of Herne Bay along the North Kent coast and is popular with visitors. ... Roman Dover Dubris or Portus Dubris, Roman name for Roman-founded town of Dover, Kent, England. ... Arms of Dover Borough Council This article is about the English port town. ... Lympne (pronounced limm) village is situated on the once sea cliffs above the Romney Marsh in Kent. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to a British ancient trackway which was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ...


Saxon and Norman history

The name Canterbury derives from the Old English Cantwarebyrig, meaning "fortress of the men of Kent". The bury element is a form of borough, which has cognates in words and place names in virtually every Indo-European and Semitic language, as well as others. For a fuller explanation, see under borough. The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred related languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, the Americas as well as many spoken in the Indian subcontinent (South Asia), the Iranian plateau (Southwest Asia), and Central Asia. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... A borough is an administrative division used in various countries. ...


A Motte and Bailey castle was constructed in Canterbury by the Normans soon after the Norman Conquest, but this was soon replaced by the stone keep of Canterbury Castle which still stands today. Model of a motte-and-bailey A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Canterbury Castle was established by the Normans, in 1080, and replaced an earlier motte and bailey fortification built at the nearby Dane John. ...


Religious significance

The gate which once led to Saint Augustine's Abbey now leads to part of the King's School.
The gate which once led to Saint Augustine's Abbey now leads to part of the King's School.
Canterbury cathedral
Canterbury cathedral
A tour of Canterbury by river.
A tour of Canterbury by river.

In 596 Pope Gregory the Great sent Augustine to convert England to Christianity. Since 431, when Pope Celestine I sent Palladius to convert the Irish to Christianity, this was the second papal mission, and King Aethelbert of Kent allowed Augustine to build a priory on the site of the present cathedral precincts in AD 597. He also built an abbey outside the city walls where he was buried: as were other early archbishops. Though St. Gregory had planned the division of England into two archbishoprics, one at London and one at York, Augustine's success at Canterbury explains how the southern archiepiscopal see came to be fixed there instead of at London. The first beginnings of the diocese are told by St. Bede (Hist. Eccl., I, xxxiii). "When Augustine, the first Archbishop of Canterbury, assumed the episcopal throne in that royal city, he recovered therein, by the King's assistance, a church which, as he was told, had been constructed by the original labour of Roman believers. This church he consecrated in the name of the Saviour, our God and Lord Jesus Christ, and there he established an habitation for himself and all his successors". The church was Saint Martin's, which is still in use today, and is considered the oldest church in England still in use. The Ancient Diocese of Canterbury was the Mother-Church and Primatial See of All England, from 597 till the death of the last Catholic Archbishop, Cardinal Pole, in 1558. Great Gate of St. ... Great Gate of St. ... Photograph by Keith Edkins File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photograph by Keith Edkins File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 604 KB) Summary I took this picture myself on 30/05/05. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 604 KB) Summary I took this picture myself on 30/05/05. ... King Ethelbert of Kent asks for missionaries to visit his kingdom Yo Momma was arisen from teh grave Bob Marley dies of chronic herpes Categories: | ... Gregory I Pope Saint Gregory I or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (c. ... Augustine of Canterbury (birth unknown, died May 26, 604) was the first Archbishop of Canterbury, sent to Ethelbert of Kent, Bretwalda (ruler) of England by Pope Gregory the Great in 597. ... Saint Celestine I was pope from 422 to 432. ... Palladius (fl. ... Statue of Ethelbert. ... The Kingdom of Kent was a kingdom of Jutes in southeast England, one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the so-called Anglo-Saxon heptarchy. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... Events Saint Augustine is created Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the historic English city. ... Bede, commonly known as the Venerable Bede, (c. ... Folio 3v from Codex Beda Petersburgiensis (746) The Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (in English: Ecclesiastical History of the English People) is a work in Latin by the Venerable Bede on the history of the Church in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between Roman... Reginald Cardinal Pole Reginald Pole (1500 - 1558) Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, was the son of Margaret Pole who was the daughter of George, Duke of Clarence. ... Events January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ...


In the 16th Century the Church of England split from Rome under Henry VIII. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


St Augustine's Abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries ordered by Henry VIII, although ruins remain. During this time Canterbury became the centre of the new Church of England, although a Catholic shrine remains. At the same time, the ancient religious school was refounded as the King's School. Canterbury Cathedral is the burial place of King Henry IV and of Edward the Black Prince, but is most famous as the scene of the murder of Thomas Becket in 1170. As a result of this event, Canterbury became a major pilgrimage site, inspiring Geoffrey Chaucer to write The Canterbury Tales in 1387. The Hospital of St Thomas was a place of lodging for pilgrims in the city. The city is also associated with the family of Thomas More (his head is buried at the church of St. Dunstan's, Canterbury, and his body at St. Peter ad Vincula at the Tower of London [1]). Medieval Gate Leading to The Ruins of Saint Augustines Abbey. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries, referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the formal process during the English Reformation by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the monastic institutions in England between 1538 and 1541. ... For other meanings see Henry VIII (disambiguation). ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ... // Birth and life before accession - relationship with Richard II - exile - return and usurpation Henry IV (April 3, 1367 – March 20, 1413) was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, hence the other name by which he was known, Henry of Bolingbroke. His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest... Edward the Black Prince - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Effigy on the Black Princes tomb in Canterbury Cathedral Edward, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince (June 15, 1330 - June 8, 1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Pilgrim at Mecca In religion and spirituality, a pilgrimage is a long journey or search of great moral significance. ... Geoffrey Chaucer (c. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... Events June 2 - John Holland, a maternal half-brother of Richard II of England, is created Earl of Huntingdon. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), posthumously known also as Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, author, and statesman. ... Church dedicated to St. ... St. ... The Tower of London, seen from the River Thames, with a view of the water gate called Traitors Gate. ...


The city is also the start/finish point for many pilgrimage routes, such as the Via Francigena to Rome, the Pilgrims' Way to Winchester and the route from Southwark taken in The Canterbury Tales. Route of the Via Francigena Via Francigena was an important medieval road connecting Canterbury, England, with Rome via France and Switzerland. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... The Pilgrims Way is reputedly the route taken by pilgrims to the shrine of Thomas Becket from Winchester in Hampshire to Canterbury in Kent, England. ... Statistics Population: 40,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU485295 Administration District: City of Winchester Shire county: Hampshire Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hampshire Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office... The Borough or Southwark is an area of the London Borough of Southwark situated 1. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ...

Later history

The "Big Dig".
The "Big Dig".

The city became a county corporate in 1461. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x600, 164 KB) Description: The Big Dig. Source: michaelpead. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x600, 164 KB) Description: The Big Dig. Source: michaelpead. ... A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ...


French Protestant refugees settled in the city during the sixteenth century: here they introduced silk-making. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... For other senses of this word, see silk (disambiguation). ...


As a historic county corporate, Canterbury was made a county borough under the Local Government Act 1888. It was the smallest such county borough, and never exceeded the 50,000 population limit initially required - the 1971 cenuss reported a population of 33,175. Under the Local Government Act 1972 it formed part of the larger Canterbury district of Kent. A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ...


During World War II the city was severely damaged by bombing after it was targeted by the Luftwaffe in the Baedeker Blitz. There is footage of the devastated areas in the 1944 film A Canterbury Tale, by film directors Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. The film is a celebration of the city, the Pilgrim's Way, and the Chaucerian stories, not a re-telling of the original tales. Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Baedeker Blitz or Baedeker raids were a series of reprisal raids for the bombing of the erstwhile Hanseatic League city of Lübeck during World War II, which was being used to supply the Russian front. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A Canterbury Tale (1944) is a British film by the film-making team of Powell & Pressburger. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Michael Powell film-maker. ... Emeric Pressburger in Paris. ...


Post-war large scale redevelopment of the city centre started quickly with the rebuilding of much of the bomb damaged east of the city, including what is now the Whitefriar's development. The ring-road was constructed some time after in stages to alleviate growing traffic problems in the city centre, which was then pedestrianised.


Canterbury today is a major city for tourism with Canterbury Cathedral alone attracting 1.2 million visitors in 2001. It still contains many ancient buildings and modern building development within the medieval town centre is strictly regulated. Tourists at Oahu island, Hawaii Tourism is the act of travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During 2004-5 the Whitefriars area of the city underwent major redevelopment and the associated archeological research was called the "Big Dig". Canterbury now has a much larger shopping attraction due to the Whitefriars development, many of the shops have undergone major redevelopment, as has the city's bus station. Locally, however, the development has been criticised for causing empty buildings in other parts of the town, due to shop movement and the closure of several local shops under competition from the increased chain store presence. For example, the Boots the Chemist seen in the 1944 A Canterbury Tale remained at that high street location until 2005, when it moved to Whitefriars. Boots is the dominant pharmacist chain in the United Kingdom, with outlets in most high streets throughout the country. ...


Demographics

  • Population (Census figures):
    • 1801: 9,500
    • 1861: 16,700
    • 1921: 18,900
    • 1961: 30,408
    • 2001: 42,258 Other statistics for 2001 include:
      • Ethnicity: 94% white. No other classification exceeds 2%
      • Area: 23.54 km²
      • Density: 1,795 / km²
        • Figures for 1801-1961 taken from Kent History Illustrated Frank W Jessup [KCC, 1966]

To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ...

Government

Canterbury City Council area (darkest shade) includes the City of Canterbury itself, in Kent
Canterbury City Council area (darkest shade) includes the City of Canterbury itself, in Kent

The local government district City of Canterbury covers an area some 13 times larger than the city of Canterbury itself, and includes Herne Bay and Whitstable. The city contains the district wards of Barton, Northgate, St Stephens, Westgate and Wincheap, plus part of the University of Kent (which straddles the city boundary) in the otherwise rural Blean Forest ward. Since October 7, 2004 the 5 wards entirely within the city have been represented by 9 Liberal Democrat, 3 Conservative and 2 Labour councillors, out of the total 50 members of the district council. location within Kent File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... location within Kent File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Statistics Population: Approx. ... Whitstable is a town in Kent, England with a population of 30,000. ... The Westgate from Westgate Gardens The Westgate is a massive medieval gatehouse in Canterbury, Kent, England. ... The University of Kent is a plate glass campus university in Kent, England. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ...


The south-western end of Canterbury comprises the parish of 'Thanington Without', the rest of the city is unparished. A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ...


The parliamentary constituency of Canterbury is represented in Parliament by the Conservative MP Julian Brazier, the Shadow Transport Minister. Canterbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Julian William Hendy Brazier TD (born July 24, 1953) is a British politician. ...


Transport

St Peter's St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993
St Peter's St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993
The River Great Stour runs through Westgate Gardens in Canterbury's city centre.
The River Great Stour runs through Westgate Gardens in Canterbury's city centre.

View of Canterbury from the West Gate. ... View of Canterbury from the West Gate. ... The Westgate from Westgate Gardens The Westgate is a massive medieval gatehouse in Canterbury, Kent, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 229 KB) Description: The River Stour runs through Westgate Gardens in Canterburys city centre. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 229 KB) Description: The River Stour runs through Westgate Gardens in Canterburys city centre. ...

Railway

Canterbury has two railway stations, Canterbury West and Canterbury East. The services from these are operated by Southeastern. Canterbury West is served primarily from London Charing Cross with limited services from Victoria as well as by trains to Ramsgate and Margate. Services from London Victoria stop at Canterbury East (journey time around 88 minutes) and continue to Dover. Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street Station in 1865. ... Canterbury West railway station is one of two stations in Canterbury in Kent. ... Canterbury East railway station is one of two stations in Canterbury in Kent. ... Southeastern is a train operating company that began operations in south-east England on 1 April 2006, replacing the former publicly-owned operator South Eastern Trains. ... Charing Cross Charing Cross railway station is a central London railway terminus. ... Ramsgate is an English seaside town on the Isle of Thanet in East Kent. ... Statistics Population: 58,465 (2001 census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TR355705 Administration District: Thanet Shire county: Kent Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: {{{Police}}} Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South East Coast Post office... Victoria station in London is a London Underground and National Rail station in the City of Westminster. ... Arms of Dover Borough Council This article is about the English port town. ...


Canterbury West station was the earliest to be built. It was opened by the South Eastern Railway from Ashford on 6 February 1846; on 13 April the line to Ramsgate was completed. Canterbury East is the more central of the two stations, although it came later, being opened by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway on 9 July 1860. The London and Greenwich Railway (LGR), together with the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (CWR) in East Kent were the earliest railways to serve the then county of Kent: eventually both became parts of the South Eastern Railway (SER). ... Ashford is a town spanning the confluence of the River Upper Great Stour, River East Stour, Aylesford Stream, Whitewater Dyke, Ruckinge Dyke and the resulting River Great Stour, in the borough of Ashford, located just south of the North Downs, in Kent, United Kingdom. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Ramsgate is an English seaside town on the Isle of Thanet in East Kent. ... Crest of the LCDR on the first Blackfriars Railway Bridge The London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR) was a railway company that operated in south-eastern England between 1859 and 1923 before grouping with three other companies to form the Southern Railway. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


Canterbury was also the terminus of the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (known locally as the 'Crab and Winkle' line) which was a pioneer line, opened in 1830, and finally closed in 1953. Despite claims by the Stockton and Darlington Railway, the Canterbury and Whitstable was the first regular passenger steam railway in the world. It included the first significant railway tunnel in the world, which is located at the Archbishop's School and the first railway bridge in the world. The locomotive which originally worked the line, Invicta, was until recently displayed at the museum at Canterbury, but now can be found in the National Railway Museum, York. Part of the former route of the line can be walked along near Tyler Hill. Part of one of the buildings of the University collapsed into the closed railway tunnel a number of years ago, extensive rebuilding and the filling in of the tunnel was required. The London and Greenwich Railway (LGR), together with the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (CWR) in East Kent were the earliest railways to serve the then county of Kent: eventually both became parts of the South Eastern Railway (SER). ... Archbishops School is a mixed ability, protestant Christian, state school situated in Canterbury, Kent. ... This article is about the historic English city. ...


Road

Canterbury is now by-passed by the A2 London to Dover Road. It is about 45 miles from the M25 London orbital motorway, and 61 miles from central London. The other main road through Canterbury is the A28 from Ashford to Ramsgate and Margate. Canterbury is legendary for traffic congestion throughout the day, and the City Council has invested heavily in Park-and-Ride systems around the City's outskirts. The A2 is a major road in the United Kingdom, connecting London with the English Channel port of Dover in Kent. ... The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The A28 near Rolvenden The A28 is a major road in England. ... Ashford is a town spanning the confluence of the River Upper Great Stour, River East Stour, Aylesford Stream, Whitewater Dyke, Ruckinge Dyke and the resulting River Great Stour, in the borough of Ashford, located just south of the North Downs, in Kent, United Kingdom. ...


The hourly National Express coach service to and from Victoria Coach Station, which leaves from the main bus station is typically scheduled to take 2 hours. National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... Victoria Coach Station is the largest and most significant coach station in London, and is operated by Victoria Coach Station Ltd. ... For other meanings, see Bus stop (disambiguation). ...


Rivers

Rectory of Blackfriars and the River
Rectory of Blackfriars and the River

The city is on the River Great Stour, flowing from Ashford to the English Channel at Sandwich, but is currently navigable only on the tidal section from Sandwich to Fordwich, north east of Canterbury. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1266 KB) Canterbury - Pfarrhaus der Blackfriars und Stour Canterbury - Rectory of the Blackfriars and Stour Source: Photo taken by my own (ABrocke) on May 25th 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Canterbury Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1266 KB) Canterbury - Pfarrhaus der Blackfriars und Stour Canterbury - Rectory of the Blackfriars and Stour Source: Photo taken by my own (ABrocke) on May 25th 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Canterbury Metadata This file contains... The River Great Stour is one of the sources of the River Stour in Kent, formed when the River East Stour and the River West Stour join at Ashford. ... Ashford is a town spanning the confluence of the River Upper Great Stour, River East Stour, Aylesford Stream, Whitewater Dyke, Ruckinge Dyke and the resulting River Great Stour, in the borough of Ashford, located just south of the North Downs, in Kent, United Kingdom. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: La Manche (IPA: ), the sleeve) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fordwich is the smallest town in England, with a population of around 300 people. ...


Educational establishments

The city has many students as it is home to several Higher Education institutions and other colleges. The University of Kent at Canterbury stands on a hill about two miles outside the city centre. Chaucer College is an independent graduate college for Japanese students within the campus of the University. Near the University of Kent is the Franciscan International Study Centre [2], a place of study for the worldwide Franciscan Order. Canterbury Christ Church University [3] is located in the city as is one of the campuses of the University College for the Creative Arts. There is also the Further Education institution, Canterbury College. There was also the St Augustine's College, Canterbury (1848-1976), a Church of England theological college. The University of Kent is a plate glass campus university in Kent, England. ... Chaucer College Canterbury is an independent graduate college for Japanese students, founded in 1992 by Hiroshi Kawashima on the Canterbury campus of the University of Kent in the United Kingdom. ... Canterbury Christ Church University is a new university based in Kent. ... The University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester (often abbreviated to the University College for the Creative Arts) is an art school based in South East England, with campuses in Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... __ __ __ _ |##| | | | / | | | _| | |##| |__| |/ | | | __| |_| ## This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... St Augustines College, Canterbury was a Church of England theological college in Canterbury, Kent that opened in 1848 and closed in 1976. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in theology, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ...


Independent secondary schools include St Edmund's School, Kent College, and what may be the world's oldest extant school The King's School. Arms of St Edmunds School St Edmund’s School is an independent secondary school (ages 13-18) in Canterbury, Kent, England. ... Kent College, Canterbury is an independent co-educational boarding and day school for pupils between the ages of 11 and 18. ... The Kings School is a British independent school situated in Canterbury, Kent. ...


State secondary schools include Archbishop's School, Barton Court Grammar School, Chaucer Technology School, Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys, Simon Langton Grammar School for Girls, The Canterbury High School and St Anselm's Catholic School. Archbishops School is a mixed ability, protestant Christian, state school situated in Canterbury, Kent. ... Barton Court Grammar School is a co-ed selective school in Canterbury. ... Chaucer Technology School is a mixed ability comprehensive school, with designated technology status situated in Canterbury, Kent. ... The Langton Lion An aerial view of The Langton Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys [1] is a selective boys school of nearly 1000 pupils and staff, located in the outskirts of Canterbury, Kent. ... Simon Langton Grammar School For Girls is an English state school of around 1000 pupils in Canterbury, Kent. ... St Anselms Catholic School is a co-educational (11-18) Catholic school, originally founded by the Archdiocese of Southwark, occupying a rural site on the fringes of Canterbury with extensive playing fields, bordered by orchards and farmland. ...


Local radio

Canterbury is served by:

  • kmfm for Canterbury, Whitstable & Herne Bay based in St Georges Place, Canterbury. The station broadcasts on 106FM. It was formerly known as kmfm 106 and before the Kent Messenger Group took control was known as CTFM based on the local postcode being 'CT'. CTFM was based round the corner from kmfm on Lower Bridge Street. KMFM 106 Website

A new community station will also be operating in the city from January 15th 2007 under the new OFCOM licensing laws it will be operating for 5 years with a broadcast area of Canterbury city and three miles around. It will be known as: kmfm is the name of six Independent Local Radio stations owned by KM Radio Ltd, each broadcasting locally to a region of Kent. ... kmfm is the name of six Independent Local Radio stations owned by KM Radio Ltd, each broadcasting locally to a region of Kent. ... kmfm is the name of six Independent Local Radio stations owned by KM Radio Ltd, each broadcasting locally to a region of Kent. ...

  • CSR FM standing for 'Canterbury Student Radio' and will broadcast on 97.4FM with studios at both the University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University. The station will be run by a collaboration of education establishments in the city including the three universities. The transmitter will be based at the University of Kent offering a good coverage of the city. CSR FM will provide a wide range of programming with a 50% speech/50% music format. The station will be non commercial as under OFCOM's rules a community station within an area served by an existing commercial radio station cannot carry advertisements. It will be the first community licence given to a student radio station in the country. CSR FM Website

CSR is a joint collaboration between 3 universities and is the combining of these two former student radio stations: The University of Kent is a plate glass campus university in Kent, England. ... Canterbury Christ Church University is a new university based in Kent. ... The University of Kent is a plate glass campus university in Kent, England. ... // Ofcom was designed to be a super regulator, required in an age where many media platforms are converging. ...

Canterbury also has a hospital radio station known as: Canterbury Christ Church University is a new university based in Kent. ... Online means being connected to the Internet or another similar electronic network, like a bulletin board system. ... UKC Radio was the student radio station for the University of Kent at Canterbury (UKC). ... The University of Kent is a plate glass campus university in Kent, England. ...

  • Canterbury Hospital Radio (CHR) serving the patients of the Kent and Canterbury Hospital. CHR Website

Trivia

The city gave its name to a musical genre known as the Canterbury Sound or Canterbury Scene (a subgenre of Progressive Rock). Shortly after there was a decline in the music scene and it is only just starting to pick itself back up again due to students running live music nights within the city. The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... For the unrelated Swedish music movement, see progg. ...


The homeless charity the Scrine Foundation is based in Canterbury. homeless charity Formerly known as the Canterbury Open Center which was formerly known as Canterbury Open Christmas. ...


Some of Canterbury's famous offspring include: Christopher Marlowe, Michael Powell, Sir Freddie Laker, Orlando Bloom and Rupert Bear. Christopher (Kit) Marlowe (baptised 26 February 1564 – 30 May 1593?) was an English dramatist, poet, and translator of the Elizabethan era. ... Michael Powell film-maker. ... Sir Frederick Alfred Laker (6 August 1922 – 9 February 2006), was a British airline entrepreneur. ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born January 13, 1977) is an English actor. ... Rupert Bear Rupert Bear is a cartoon character created by Mary Tourtel and who first appeared in the Daily Express on November 8, 1920. ...


Canterbury is a World Heritage site because of the three following places:- Canterbury Cathedral, St Augustine's Abbey and St. Martin's. Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ... Medieval Gate Leading to The Ruins of Saint Augustines Abbey. ... Parish church in Canterbury, out of town centre. ...


Affiliations

Canterbury is twinned with the following city: This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

The district also participates in the Sister Cities programme, with links to: Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm Town twinning or sister cities is a concept whereby towns or cities from geographically and politically distinct areas are paired, with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... location in McLean County, Illinois Coordinates: Founded 1822 Incorporated Dec. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia_(bordered). ... Vladimir (Влади́мир) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Vladimir Oblast. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Basilica in Esztergom. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
 view  talk  edit 
The city of Canterbury in Kent, South East England
with the surrounding suburbs, villages, towns and parishes :

AdishamBarhamBekesbourne • Bekesbourne-with-Patrixbourne • BishopsbourneBleanBridgeCharthamChartham HatchChestfieldChisletEast StourmouthFordwichGreenhillHackingtonHarbledownHerneHerne and BroomfieldHerne BayHersdenHoathIckhamIckham and WellKingstonLittlebourneLower HardresMarshsidePatrixbournePethamPlucks GutterReculver • Stourmouth • Sturry • Swalecliffe • Tankerton • Thanington Without • Tyler Hill • Upper HarbledownUpper Hardres • Waltham • WestbereWhitstableWickhambreauxWomenswold Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... A village is a human residential settlement commonly found in rural areas. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Adisham (formerly Adesham) is a village and civil parish in the English county of Kent. ... Barham is a village and civil parish in the City of Canterbury district of Kent, England. ... Bekesbourne is a village, within the civil parish of Bekesbourne-with-Patrixbourne, near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Bekesbourne-with-Patrixbourne is a civil parish in the City of Canterbury district of Kent, England. ... Bishopsbourne is a small village in Kent, UK. It lies in the Nailbourne valley four miles from Canterbury and about fifteen miles from Dover. ... Blean is located in the Canterbury district of Kent, England. ... Bridge is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Chartham is a village (population: 4,941 - 2001 census) in Kent, 4 miles west of Canterbury. ... Chartham Hatch is a small village of around 200 households situated around 5 miles South-West of Canterbury. ... Chestfield is a village (and civil parish along with Swalecliffe) in the Canterbury District of Kent, England. ... Chislet is a sprawling rural parish in the northeast of the English county of Kent between the city of Canterbury and the Isle of Thanet. ... East Stourmouth is part of the parish of Stourmouth in Kent, England. ... Fordwich is the smallest town in England, with a population of around 300 people. ... Greenhill is a village near Herne Bay, part of the Herne and Broomfield parish, in the district of Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Hackington is a civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England, including the village of Tyler Hill. ... Harbledown is a village to the west of Canterbury, Kent, now contiguous with the city and in effect a suburb. ... Herne is a village, in the civil parish of Herne and Broomfield, near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Herne and Broomfield is a civil parish within the City of Canterbury. ... Statistics Population: Approx. ... Hersden is a village near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Hoath is a small village situated within the Canterbury area. ... Ickham is a village, within the civil parish of Ickham and Well, five miles east of Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Ickham and Well is a civil parish east of Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Kingston is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Littlebourne is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Lower Hardres is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Marshside is a hamlet in the English county of Kent. ... Patrixbourne is a small settlement within the civil parish of Bekesbourne-with-Patrixbourne in the Canterbury District of Kent, England. ... Petham is a small village and civil parish in the North Downs, five miles south of Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... Plucks Gutter is a small hamlet in Kent, England where the River Little Stour and River Great Stour meet. ... Reculver is a summer resort situated about 3 miles east of Herne Bay along the North Kent coast and is popular with visitors. ... Sturry is a small village on the River Stour three miles north-east of Canterbury in Kent. ... A suburb of Whitstable, Tankerton was a commercial development by the Tankerton Estate Company in the late 19th century, and was designed with a grid of streets leading from the shoreline. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Upper Hardres is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. ... A small village in Kent between Canterbury and Thanet. ... Whitstable is a town in Kent, England with a population of 30,000. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Womenswold (formerly spelt Wymynswold[1]) is a village situated about 3 miles north of Adisham and about 5 miles south-west of Bridge near Canterbury, Kent, England. ...

The district of the City of Canterbury
List of places in Kent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Canterbury Official Tourism Website (285 words)
Canterbury has the perfect blend of city, coast and countryside, ensuring that however varied your interests are, you will be spoilt for choice.
History and Heritage Canterbury has been welcoming travellers for centuries, and they have all left their mark.
Explore Canterbury's medieval atmosphere and historical charm with two Hidden Gem Trails available to purchase at Canterbury Information Centre for £1.25 each.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Canterbury (1829 words)
Diocese of Canterbury was the Mother-Church and Primatial See of All England, from 597 till the death of the last Catholic Archbishop, Cardinal Pole, in 1558.
Canterbury, and reorganized the arrangement of property, dividing off that of the archbishop from that of the monastery, with the result that from that
Canterbury became absorbed in the wider duties of primate, as is seen in the episcopate of St.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m