FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Canadian federal election results since 1867
A Conservative election poster from 1891.

This article provides a summary of results for the general elections to the Canadian House of Commons, the elected lower half of Canada's federal bicameral legislative body, the Parliament of Canada. The number of seats has increased steadily over time, from 180 for the first election, to the current total of 308. The current federal government structure was established in 1867 by the Constitution Act. For the eight general elections of the Province of Canada prior to 1867, see List of elections in the Province of Canada. Image File history File links John_A_Macdonald_election_poster_1891. ... Image File history File links John_A_Macdonald_election_poster_1891. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... The Constitution Act, 1867 (formerly called the British North America Act, 1867, and still known informally as the BNA Act), constitutes a major part of Canadas Constitution. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // The Province of Canada was the union of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada and later Ontario) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada and later Quebec). ...


Two parties have dominated politics in Canada: the Liberal party and the historic Conservative party (known as the Progressive Conservative party from 1943). If one regards the modern Conservative party as the successor to the historic one, then these are the only two parties to have formed a government. (The 1917 win was by a pro-conscription Unionist coalition, between former Liberals and Conservatives). The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The name Conservative Party of Canada has been used twice in Canadian history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir...


Although government has been a two-party system, Canadian federal politics has been a multi-party affair since the 1920s, which saw significant parliamentary presence from the Progressive party and the United Farmers movement. They were supplanted by the Social Credit party and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) in the 1930s. The CCF evolved into the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 1961. The Social Credit party and the CCF/NDP occupied the 3rd and 4th party slots between them from the 1930s, until the Social Credit party failed to win any seats in the 1980 election. Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate the voting in nearly all elections. ... A multi-party system is a type of party system. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... The United Farmers movement in Canada rose to prominence after World War I. With the failure of the wartime Union government to alter a tariff structure that hurt farmers, various farmers movements across Canada became more radical and entered the political arena. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada (French: Parti Crédit social du Canada), was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ...


Since 1980, the NDP have remained a presence in the Canadian parliament, but the situation amongst other non-government parties has been more complex. The historic Conservative party never recovered from its spectacular defeat in the 1993 election (when it went from being the majority government with 169 seats, to just two seats and the loss of official party status). Right-wing politics has since seen the rise and fall of the Reform party and the Canadian Alliance, followed by the rise to government of the new Conservative party. Further, 1993 saw the first seats won by the separatist Bloc Québécois, who have been a constant presence in the Canadian parliament since then. The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party that existed from 1987 to 2000. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Bloc Québécois (BQ) is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that defines itself as devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ...

Contents

Party colour key
  Liberal   Canadian Alliance
New Democratic Party Conservative
Anti-Confederate Liberal-Conservative,
Conservative (historic), [M]
Progressive Conservative
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation
Social Credit Bloc Québécois
United Farmers Progressive
Reform Unionist coalition

The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Anti-Confederation was the name used by several parties in what is now Atlantic Canada by movements opposed to Canadian confederation. ... The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The name Conservative Party of Canada has been used twice in Canadian history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada (French: Parti Crédit social du Canada), was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... The Bloc Québécois (BQ) is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that defines itself as devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... The United Farmers movement in Canada rose to prominence after World War I. With the failure of the wartime Union government to alter a tariff structure that hurt farmers, various farmers movements across Canada became more radical and entered the political arena. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party that existed from 1987 to 2000. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir...

Summary of results

The third, fourth and fifth parties' results are included under "other" if the party did not achieve at least four seats at some point in its history. Independent candidates are listed under "Others."

Election
Year
Summary Government Official
opposition
Third
party
Fourth
party
Other
parties
Total
seats
1st 1867 Conservative Party, led by Sir John A. Macdonald, is elected to form Canada's first majority government, defeating the Liberals and their de facto leader George Brown. 100 [A] 62 18 [B] - 0 180
2nd 1872 Conservatives under Macdonald are re-elected with a second majority, defeating the Liberals and their de facto leader Edward Blake. 100 [C] 95 - - 5 200
3rd 1874 Liberal Party, led by Alexander Mackenzie, retains power with a majority after having formed a government when Conservative Macdonald lost the confidence of the House in 1873. 129 65 [A] - - 12 206
4th 1878 Conservatives, led by Macdonald, defeat Mackenzie's Liberals, returning Macdonald to power with a third majority. 134 [A] 63 - - 9 206
5th 1882 Conservatives, led by Macdonald, are re-elected with a fourth majority, defeating Edward Blake's Liberals. 134 [D] 73 - - 4 211
6th 1887 Conservatives, led by Macdonald, are re-elected with a fifth majority, defeating Edward Blake's Liberals. 124 [D] 80 - - 11 215
7th 1891 Conservatives, led by Macdonald, are re-elected with a sixth majority, in Macdonald's final election before his death shortly after. Macdonald defeated rookie Liberal opposition leader Wilfrid Laurier. 118 [D] 90 - - 7 215
8th 1896 Liberals, led by Sir Wilfrid Laurier, are elected with a majority, defeating the Conservatives of prime minister Sir Charles Tupper. 117 86 [A] - - 10 213
9th 1900 Liberals, led by Laurier, are re-elected with a second majority, defeating Tupper's Conservatives. 128 79 [A] - - 6 213
10th 1904 Liberals, led by Laurier, are re-elected with a third majority, defeating the Conservatives of Sir Robert Borden. 137 75 [A] - - 2 214
11th 1908 Liberals, led by Laurier, are re-elected with a fourth majority, defeating Borden and the Conservatives. 133 85 [A] - - 3 221
12th 1911 Conservatives, led by Sir Robert Borden, defeat Laurier's Liberals with a majority. 132 [A] 85 - - 4 221
13th 1917 Conservatives, led by Borden, are re-elected with a majority as part of a pro-conscription unionists coalition, which had former Liberals and Conservatives in the cabinet. The Unionists defeat Laurier's anti-conscription Liberals in the most bitter campaign in Canadian history. 153 82 - - 0 235
14th 1921 Liberals, led by William Lyon Mackenzie King, win a minority government, defeating Conservative prime minister Arthur Meighen. The Conservatives are reduced to third place in the House. However the Progressives decline the title of official opposition, so Meighen becomes opposition leader. 118 49 58 3 [E] 7 235
15th 1925 Mackenzie King's Liberals hold on to power with the help of Progressive Robert Forke, despite Conservatives, led by Arthur Meighen, winning more seats. The Progressives withdraw support from scandal-plagued Liberals and refuse to support the Conservatives, triggering the 1926 election. 100 115 22 2 [F] 6 245
16th 1926 Liberals, led by Mackenzie King, defeat Meighen's Conservatives, winning a minority supported by the eight Liberal-Progressives. Also see the King-Byng Affair. 116 91 11 12 [E] 15 245
17th 1930 Conservatives, led by R.B. Bennett, win a majority, defeating the Liberals under Mackenzie King. 134 90 9 [F] 3 9 245
18th 1935 Liberals, led by Mackenzie King, defeat Bennett's Conservatives with a majority. 173 39 17 7 9 245
19th 1940 Liberals, led by Mackenzie King, are re-elected with a second consecutive majority, defeating Robert Manion's National Government party, a failed attempt to recreate Robert Borden's World War I-era Unionists. 179 39 [G] 10 [H] 8 9 245
20th 1945 Liberals, led by Mackenzie King, are re-elected with a third consecutive majority, defeating the newly renamed Progressive Conservatives, led by John Bracken. 118 66 28 13 20 245
21st 1949 Liberals, led by Liberal prime minister Louis St-Laurent, are re-elected with a fourth majority, defeating the Progressive Conservatives led by George Drew. 191 [I] 41 13 10 7 262
22nd 1953 Liberals, led by St. Laurent, are re-elected with a fifth majority, defeating George Drew's Progressive Conservatives. 169 [I] 51 23 15 7 265
23rd 1957 Progressive Conservatives, led by John Diefenbaker, defeat Liberals, led by St-Laurent with an upset minority victory 111 104 [I] 25 19 6 265
24th 1958 Progressive Conservatives, led by Diefenbaker, are re-elected with the largest majority to date in Canadian history, defeating the Liberals and their new leader Lester Pearson. 208 48 [I] 8 - 1 265
25th 1962 Progressive Conservatives, led by Diefenbaker, are re-elected, but with a minority. 116 99 [I] 30 19 1 265
26th 1963 Liberals, led by Lester Pearson, defeat Diefenbaker's Progressive Conservatives, winning a minority 128 [I] 95 24 17 1 265
27th 1965 Liberals, led by Pearson, are re-elected with a second minority, defeating Diefenbaker's Progressive Conservatives. 131 97 21 14 [J] 2 265
28th 1968 Liberals, led by new prime minister Pierre Trudeau, are re-elected with a majority, defeating the Progressive Conservatives led by Robert Stanfield. 154 [I] 72 22 14 [K] 2 264
29th 1972 Liberals, led by Trudeau, are re-elected, but with a minority, defeating Stanfield's Progressive Conservatives by only two seats. 109 107 31 15 2 264
30th 1974 Liberals, led by Trudeau, defeat Stanfields's Progressive Conservatives with a majority. 141 95 16 11 1 264
31st 1979 Progressive Conservatives, Joe Clark, defeat Liberals, led by Trudeau, and win a minority, despite winning a significantly smaller share of the vote than the Liberals. The Progressive Conservatives won the highest vote share in seven provinces, but the Liberals captured an enormous lead in Quebec 136 114 26 6 0 282
32nd 1980 Progressive Conservatives, led by Joe Clark, are defeated by the Liberals, led by Pierre Trudeau. 147 103 32 - 0 282
33rd 1984 Progressive Conservatives, led by Brian Mulroney, defeat Liberals, led by prime minister John Turner and win the most seats in Canadian history. The election is both the best showing ever for the Progressive Conservatives, and the worst showing ever for the Liberals. 211 40 30 - 1 282
34th 1988 Conservative Mulroney is re-elected with a second majority, contending with a much stronger performance from Liberal Turner, and a strong third-party showing from Ed Broadbent's New Democrats, winning that party's best result ever as of 2007. 169 83 43 - 0 295
35th 1993 Liberals, led by Liberal Jean Chrétien, win a majority, defeating the Progressive Conservatives, led by new prime minister Kim Campbell. Ex-Mulroney cabinet minister Lucien Bouchard's separatist Bloc Québécois become the official opposition, and the right-wing Reform Party, led by Preston Manning, becomes the third party. Meanwhile Audrey McLaughlin's New Democrats and Campbell's Progressive Conservatives both have their worst electoral results ever, with 9 and 2 seats, respectively. 177 54 52 9 3 295
36th 1997 Liberals, led by Chretien, are re-elected with a second majority. Manning's Reform Party become the official opposition. The Progressive Conservatives under Jean Charest win nearly as many votes as Manning's Reform Party, but only one-third the seats. 155 60 44 21 21 [N] 301
37th 2000 Liberals, led by Chretien, are re-elected with a third majority, defeating Stockwell Day's Canadian Alliance, the failed attempt to unite the Reform Party and the Progressive Conservatives. The Progressive Conservatives, lead by former prime minister Joe Clark, are only just able to keep official party status in the House of Commons by winning the necessary 12 seats. 172 66 38 13 12 [O] 301
38th 2004 The Liberals are re-elected under new Prime minister Paul Martin to a minority government. They defeat the new Conservative party, led by Stephen Harper, ex-leader of the Canadian Alliance. Gilles Duceppe's Bloc Quebecois experience a revival due to a Quebec-based Liberal scandal. Jack Layton's NDP come 1 seat short of being able to guarantee the survival of Martin's government. 135 99 54 19 1 308
39th 2006 Conservatives, led by Stephen Harper, win a minority, defeating Martin's Liberals. The BQ retain most of its seats; the NDP improve their fourth-place position. 124 103 51 29 1 308

The Canadian parliament after the 1867 election The 1867 federal election, which proved how much canada sucks ended on September 20th, was the first election for the new . ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Right Honourable Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, QC (January 11, 1815 - June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 - November 5, 1873 - and - October 17, 1878 - June 6, 1891. ... In the Westminster System, a majority government is one in which the government enjoys an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or Parliament. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... George Brown George Brown (November 29, 1818 – May 9, 1880) was a Scottish-born Canadian journalist and politician. ... Politics of Canada Categories: Stub | Canadian federal elections ... Dominick Edward Blake, PC, QC (October 13, 1833 – March 1, 1912), (known as Edward Blake) was Premier of Ontario, Canada, from 1871 to 1872 and leader of the Liberal Party of Canada from 1880 to 1887. ... The Canadian federal election of 1874 was held on January 22, 1874. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Alexander Mackenzie, PC (January 28, 1822 – April 17, 1892), a writer, was the second Prime Minister of Canada from November 7, 1873 to October 9, 1878. ... A Motion of Confidence is a motion of support proposed by a government in a parliament or other assembly of elected representatives to give members of parliament (or other such assembly) a chance to register their confidence in a government. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election The Canadian federal election of 1878 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1882 election The Canadian federal election of 1882 was held on June 20, 1882 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1887 election The Canadian federal election of 1887 was held on February 22, 1887 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 1891 Canadian federal election was won by the Conservative Party of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Leader of the Opposition (French: Chef de lOpposition) in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... Sir Wilfrid Laurier, PC, GCMG, KC, BCL, DCL, LLD, DLitt, baptized Henri-Charles-Wilfrid Laurier (November 20, 1841 – February 17, 1919) was the seventh Prime Minister of Canada from July 11, 1896, to October 5, 1911. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1896 election The Canadian federal election of 1896 was held on June 23, 1896 to elect members of the 8th Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1900 election The Canadian federal election of 1900 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC, DCL, LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1908 election The Canadian federal election of 1908 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by MPs in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir Wilfrid Laurier in... The Canadian parliament after the 1921 election The Canadian federal election of 1921 was held on December 6, 1921 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... For minority governments in general, see dominant minority. ... Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. ... Mackenzie King requested a dissolution of Parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election The Canadian federal election of 1945 was the 20th general election in Canadian history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... The Canadian federal election of 1949 was the first election in Canada in almost thirty years in which the Liberals were not led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. ... Louis Stephen St. ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC , QC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... National results Notes: (1) The Liberal-Labour MP sat with the Liberal caucus. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1957 election The Canadian federal election of 1957 was held June 10, 1957, to elect members of the 23rd Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... The 24th general election was held just nine months after the 23rd and transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbakers minority into the largest ever majority government in Canadian history. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson (April 23, 1897 - December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1962 election The Canadian federal election of 1962 was held on June 18, 1962 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Map of Canadas provinces and territories and which party won the most votes in each province and territory and their popular vote. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1965, the Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of June 25, 1968, the Liberal Party won a majority government under its new leader, Pierre Trudeau. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... Robert Lorne Stanfield, PC, QC (April 11, 1914–December 16, 2003) was Premier of Nova Scotia and leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... The House of Commons after the 1972 election The Canadian federal election of 1972 was held on October 30, 1972 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8, 1974 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1979 election The Canadian federal election of 1979 was held on May 22, 1979 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ... Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... John Napier Turner, PC, CC, QC, MA, BCL, LLD (born June 7, 1929) was the seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 30, 1984 to September 17, 1984. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... John Edward Ed Broadbent, PC, CC, Ph. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... This article is about the former Canadian Prime Minster. ... Lucien Bouchard, PC , B.Sc , LL.B (born December 22, 1938 in Saint-Coeur-de-Marie, Quebec, Canada) is a Quebec lawyer, diplomat and politician. ... The Bloc Québécois (BQ) is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that defines itself as devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party that existed from 1987 to 2000. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... The Honourable Audrey Marlene McLaughlin, OC, P.C. (born November 7, 1936) was leader of Canadas New Democratic Party, and the first woman leader of a major Canadian federal party. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... John James Charest, PC, LL.B., MNA, known as Jean Charest IPA: (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... Stockwell Burt Day Jr. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB, LLD (h. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Gilles Duceppe, MP (born July 22, 1947 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Quebec nationalist and social democratic politician in Canada. ... John Gilbert Jack Layton, PC, MP, PhD (born July 18, 1950) is a social democratic Canadian politician and current leader of Canadas New Democratic Party (since 2003). ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...

Notes

A 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Includes results for the Liberal-Conservative Party.
B  The Anti-Confederates campaigned against confederatation, but latter sat with the Liberals.
C  Includes results for the Liberal-Conservative Party, and one "Conservative Labour" candidate.
D 1  2  3  Includes results for the Liberal-Conservative and Nationalist Conservative parties.
E 1  2  Combined total for United Farmers of Alberta and United Farmers of Ontario.
F 1  2  Seats won by the United Farmers of Alberta.
G  Includes results for National Government party.
H  Includes results for New Democracy party.
I 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Includes one seat won by a Liberal-Labour candidate in Kenora—Rainy River who sat in the House as a Liberal.
J  Includes 9 seats won by the Ralliement créditiste party.
K  All 14 seats were won by the Ralliement créditiste party.
M  In the 1921 election, the Conservatives ran under the name National Liberal and Conservative Party, and in 1940 under the name National Government. In both cases the Conservatives lost the election and the new name was soon abandoned.
N  Includes 20 seats won by the Progressive Conservative party.
O  All 12 seats were won by the Progressive Conservative party.

The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The label Nationalist Conservative was used by three Quebec Members of the Canadian Parliament (MPs) and several unsuccessful candidates. ... The United Farmers of Alberta was founded in 1909 as a lobby organization representing the interests of farmers. ... The United Farmers of Ontario (UFO) were the Ontario section of the nation-wide United Farmers movement that arose in Canada in the early part of the 20th century. ... The United Farmers of Alberta was founded in 1909 as a lobby organization representing the interests of farmers. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... New Democracy was a political party in Canada founded by William Duncan Herridge in 1939. ... The Liberal-Labour banner has also been used several times by candidates in Canadian elections: Malcolm Lang, who was elected as a Labour Party of Canada Member of Parliament in the 1926 federal election, was re-elected as Liberal-Labour in the north-eastern Ontario riding of Timiskaming South in... Kenora—Rainy River was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Ontario. ... Historically in Quebec, Canada, there was a number of political parties that were part of the Canadian social credit movement. ... The National Liberal and Conservative Party was the name adopted by the Canadian Conservatives in 1920 after the end of the Unionist government of Robert Borden. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

See also

Canada was federated in 1867. ... Elections in Canada gives information on election and election results in Canada. ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... // The Province of Canada was the union of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada and later Ontario) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada and later Quebec). ... This is a list of by-elections in Canada since 1980. ...

References

  • History of Federal Ridings since 1867. Parliament of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
Elections in Canada
v  d  e
Most recent:    Federal 2006 | Provinces summary
BC 2005 | Alberta 2004 | Saskatchewan 2007 | Manitoba 2007 | Ontario 2007
Quebec 2007 | New Brunswick 2006 | Nova Scotia 2006 | PEI 2007 | Nfld. & Lab. 2007
Yukon 2006 | NWT 2007 | Nunavut 2004
Lists: Summary | Federal | BC | AB | SK | MB | ON | QC | NB | NS | PEI | NL | YU | NT | NU
Electoral districts: BC | AB | SK | MB | ON | QC | NB | NS | PEI | NL | YU | NT | NU


Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... Popular vote map by riding. ... Alberta riding map showing the winning parties and their vote percentage in each won riding. ... The 26th Saskatchewan general election will be the twenty-sixth provincial election held in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... On April 20, 2007, Premier of Manitoba Gary Doer announced that a general election will be held on May 22, 2007. ... The Ontario general election of 2007 is scheduled to be held on October 10, 2007 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The new composition of the legislature Map of Quebecs ridings coloured in to indicate ridings won by each party and their popular vote. ... Map of New Brunswicks ridings coloured in based on the winning parties and their popular vote The 2006 general election (more formally the 56th general election) was held on September 18, 2006, in the province of New Brunswick, Canada to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick. ... Riding map of Nova Scotia showing winning parties. ... Map of PEIs ridings coloured in based on how they voted Prince Edward Island general election was held on May 28, 2007. ... The Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2007 is scheduled to be held on October 9, 2007 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The next Yukon general election will be held on October 10, 2006, in the Yukon Territory in [{Canada]] to elect members of the Yukon Legislative Assembly. ... The 2007 Northwest Territories general election will take place on 1 October 2007. ... Nunavut, Canada conducted its second general election on February 16, 2004, to elect the 19 members of the Legislative Assembly. ... This article provides a timeline of elections in Canadas provinces (and also Yukon, the only territory to have politcal parties). ... British Columbia is a province of Canada. ... Alberta is a province of Canada. ... Saskatchewan is province in Canada. ... Proportion of seats won by major parties for each election This article provides a summary of results for the general elections to the Canadian province of Manitobas unicameral legislative body, the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. ... Beginning with the 2003 election, Ontario elections are held every 4 years in October. ... This is a list of Quebec general elections since Confederation in 1867, when Quebec became a province of the Dominion of Canada. ... Number of seats won by major parties at each election This article provides a summary of results for the general elections to the Canadian province of New Brunswicks unicameral legislative body, the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick. ... Number of seats won by major parties at each election This article provides a summary of results for the general elections to the Canadian province of Nova Scotias unicameral legislative body, the Nova Scotia House of Assembly. ... This article provides a summary of results for the general elections to the Canadian province of Prince Edward Islands unicameral legislative body, the Prince Edward Island House of Assembly. ... Newfoundland and Labrador is part of Canada. ... The Yukon Territory is part of Canada. ... This is a list of territorial elections in the Northwest Territories, Canada since 1870. ... The territory of Nunavut, in Canadas arctic which was created in 1999 has had two elections in its short history: Nunavut general election, 1999 Nunavut general election, 2004 Nunavut uses consensus government, which means there are no parties. ... Alberta provincial electoral districts are currently single member ridings that each elect one member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1867 election The 1867 federal election, which proved how much canada sucks ended on September 20th, was the first election for the new . ... Politics of Canada Categories: Stub | Canadian federal elections ... The Canadian federal election of 1874 was held on January 22, 1874. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election The Canadian federal election of 1878 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1882 election The Canadian federal election of 1882 was held on June 20, 1882 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1887 election The Canadian federal election of 1887 was held on February 22, 1887 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 1891 Canadian federal election was won by the Conservative Party of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1896 election The Canadian federal election of 1896 was held on June 23, 1896 to elect members of the 8th Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1900 election The Canadian federal election of 1900 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1908 election The Canadian federal election of 1908 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1921 election The Canadian federal election of 1921 was held on December 6, 1921 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election The Canadian federal election of 1945 was the 20th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian federal election of 1949 was the first election in Canada in almost thirty years in which the Liberals were not led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. ... National results Notes: (1) The Liberal-Labour MP sat with the Liberal caucus. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1957 election The Canadian federal election of 1957 was held June 10, 1957, to elect members of the 23rd Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 24th general election was held just nine months after the 23rd and transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbakers minority into the largest ever majority government in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1962 election The Canadian federal election of 1962 was held on June 18, 1962 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Map of Canadas provinces and territories and which party won the most votes in each province and territory and their popular vote. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1965, the Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of June 25, 1968, the Liberal Party won a majority government under its new leader, Pierre Trudeau. ... The House of Commons after the 1972 election The Canadian federal election of 1972 was held on October 30, 1972 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8, 1974 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1979 election The Canadian federal election of 1979 was held on May 22, 1979 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... The 40th Canadian federal election, barring war or insurrection, must be called no later than October 19, 2009, according to Bill C-16, which was passed by the 39th Parliament. ...

1st | 2nd | 3rd | 4th | 5th | 6th | 7th | 8th | 9th | 10th | 11th | 12th | 13th | 14th | 15th | 16th | 17th | 18th | 19th | 20th | 21st | 22nd | 23rd | 24th | 25th | 26th | 27th | 28th | 29th | 30th | 31st | 32nd | 33rd | 34th | 35th | 36th | 37th | 38th | 39th


Canadian Parliaments are the legislative bodies of the Government of Canada. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The initial seat distribution of the 1st Canadian parliament The 1st Canadian parliament was in session from November 6, 1867 until July 8, 1872. ... The initial seat distribution of the 2nd Canadian Parliament Sir John A. Macdonald was Prime Minister during most of the 2nd Canadian Parliament. ... Contents // Categories: Canada government stubs | Canadian parliaments ... The initial seat distribution of the 4th Canadian parliament The 4th Canadian parliament was in session from 1878 until 1882. ... The initial seat distribution of the 5th Canadian parliament The 5th Canadian parliament was in session from 1882 until 1887. ... The initial seat distribution of the 6th Canadian parliament The 6th Canadian parliament was in session from 1887 until 1891. ... The initial seat distribution of the 7th Canadian Parliament Several people served as Prime Minister during the 7th Canadian Parliament. ... The initial seat distribution of the 8th Canadian parliament The 8th Canadian parliament was in session from 1896 until 1900. ... The initial seat distribution of the 9th Canadian parliament The 9th Canadian parliament was in session from 1900 until 1904. ... The initial seat distribution of the 10th Canadian parliament The 10th Canadian parliament was in session from 1904 until 1908. ... The initial seat distribution of the 11th Canadian parliament The 11th Canadian parliament was in session from 1908 until 1911. ... The initial seat distribution of the 12th Canadian parliament The 12th Canadian parliament was in session from 1911 until 1917. ... The initial seat distribution of the 13th Canadian parliament The 13th Canadian parliament was in session from 1917 until 1921. ... The initial seat distribution of the 14th Canadian parliament The 14th Canadian parliament was in session from 1921 until 1925. ... The initial seat distribution of the 15th Canadian parliament The 15th Canadian parliament was in session from 1925 until 1926. ... The initial seat distribution of the 16th Canadian parliament The 16th Canadian parliament was in session from 1926 until 1930. ... The initial seat distribution of the 17th Canadian parliament The 17th Canadian parliament was in session from 1930 until 1935. ... The initial seat distribution of the 18th Canadian parliament The 18th Canadian parliament was in session from 1935 until 1940. ... The initial seat distribution of the 19th Canadian parliament The 19th Canadian parliament was in session from 1940 until 1945. ... The 20th Canadian parliament was in session from 1945 until 1949. ... The 21st Canadian parliament was in session from 1949 until 1953. ... The 22nd Canadian parliament was in session from 1953 until 1957. ... The 23rd Canadian parliament was in session from 1957 until 1958. ... The 24th Canadian parliament was in session from 1958 until 1962. ... The 25th Canadian parliament was in session from 1962 until 1963. ... The 26th Canadian parliament was in session from 1963 until 1965. ... The 27th Canadian parliament was in session from 1965 until 1968. ... The initial seat distribution of the 28th Canadian parliament The 28th Canadian parliament was in session from 1968 until 1972. ... The initial seat distribution of the 29th Canadian parliament The 29th Canadian parliament was in session from 1972 until 1974. ... The initial seat distribution of the 30th Canadian parliament The 30th Canadian parliament was in session from 1974 until 1979. ... The initial seat distribution of the 31st Canadian Parliament Joe Clark was Prime Minister during the 31st Canadian Parliament. ... The initial seat distribution of the 32nd Canadian parliament The 32nd Canadian parliament was in session from March 1980 until June 1984. ... The initial seat distribution of the 33rd Canadian parliament The 33rd Canadian parliament was in session from 1984 until 1988. ... The initial seat distribution of the 34th Canadian Parliament Brian Mulroney was Prime Minister during most of the 34th Canadian Parliament. ... The 35th Canadian parliament was in session from 1993 until 1997. ... The initial seat distribution of the 36th Canadian Parliament Jean Chrétien was Prime Minister during the 36th Canadian Parliament( and is also a pedafile). ... 37th Parliament * - formerly a member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada ** - formerly a member of the Canadian Alliance Party Categories: Canadian parliaments ... The initial seat distribution of the 38th Canadian Parliament Paul Martin was Prime Minister during the 38th Canadian Parliament. ... The initial seat distribution of the 39th Canadian Parliament Stephen Harper is the Prime Minister of the 39th Parliament. ...

Federal political parties | Federal electoral districts | Historical federal electoral districts

  Results from FactBites:
 
Election Resources on the Internet: Federal Elections in Canada - Elections to the House of Commons (2310 words)
The Reform Party (which became the Canadian Alliance in 2000) displaced the Progressive Conservatives as the major right-wing force at the federal level, but the party was unable to mount an effective challenge to the Liberals, who dominated Canadian federal politics from 1993 to 2006.
As in the United Kingdom, the Crown is formally an integral part of Parliament, but the role of the monarch - since 1952, Queen Elizabeth II - and of her representative in Canada, the Governor General, is primarily ceremonial.
Between 1962 and 1980, eight federal elections were held in Canada, five of which (1962, 1963, 1965, 1972 and 1979) resulted in minority governments, as no party won an absolute majority of seats in the House of Commons.
Past Canadian Elections - Historical Results & Analysis (376 words)
Examine the detailed results of the 2004, 2000 and 1997 elections, which are available with the results broken down by province as well.
Compare the summary results of 37 general elections held between 1867 to 2006 with each party's share of the votes and seats, as well as the number of candidates and overall voter turnout.
For a background to the 2006 election you can view and the standings of the political parties in Parliament at the time it was dissolved in late November 2005.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m