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Encyclopedia > Canadian federal election, 1979
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Politics Portal

The House of Commons after the 1979 election
The House of Commons after the 1979 election

The Canadian federal election of 1979 was held on May 22, 1979 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. It resulted in the defeat of Liberal Party of Canada after 11 years in power under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. Joe Clark led the Progressive Conservative Party to power, but with only a minority of seats in the House of Commons. see for legend File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... see for legend File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas current governing political party. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Joseph Philippe Pierre Yves Elliott Trudeau PC, CC, CH, QC, MA, LL.D, FRSC (October 18, 1919 – September 28, 2000) was the fifteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 20, 1968 to June 3, 1979, and from March 3, 1980 to June 30, 1984. ... The Right Honourable Charles Joseph Clark, PC , CC , AOE , MA , LL.D (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 2, 1980. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ...


The Trudeau Liberals had become very unpopular during their last term in government because of large budget deficits, high inflation, and high unemployment. Although elections in Canada are normally held four years apart, Trudeau deferred calling an election until five years after the previous election in the hope that the Liberal Party would be able to recover some of the support that it had lost.


The effort was unsuccessful, however, and the Liberals lost 27 seats. Several high-profile cabinet ministers were defeated. Trudeau resigned as Liberal leader following the election.


The PC Party campaigned on the slogans, "Let's get Canada working again", and "It's time for a change - give the future a chance!" Canadians were not, however, sufficiently confident in the young Joe Clark to give him a majority in the House of Commons. Quebec, in particular, was unwilling to support Clark, and elected only two PC Members of Parliament (MPs) in the province's 75 ridings. Clark, relatively unknown when elected as PC leader at the 1976 PC Party convention, was seen as being bumbling and unsure. Clark had had problems with certain right-wing members of his caucus. In particular, when Clark's riding was merged into the riding of another PC MP during a redistribution of ridings, the other MP refused to step aside, and Clark ended up running in another riding. Also, when Clark undertook a tour of the Middle East Asia in order to show his ability to handle foreign affairs issues, his luggage was lost, and Clark appeared to be uncomfortable with the issues being discussed. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... This page refers to a Riding as a unit in local government. ... The first Progressive Conservative Party of Canada leadership convention was held in 1927, when the party was called the Conservative Party. ...


The Liberals tried to make leadership and Clark's inexperience the issue, arguing in their advertising that "This is no time for on-the-job training", and "We need tough leadership to keep Canada growing. A leader must be a leader."


The Social Credit Party of Canada, which had lost its mercurial leader, Réal Caouette, who died in 1976, struggled to remain relevant. After a series of interim leaders, including Caouette's son, the party turned to Fabien Roy, a popular member of the National Assembly of Quebec, who took the reins of the party just before the beginning of the campaign. The party won the tacit support of the separatist Parti Québécois, which formed the government of Quebec. Social Credit attempted to rally the separatist and nationalist vote: Canadian flags were absent at its campaign kick-off rally, and the party's slogan was C'est à notre tour ("It's our turn"), which was reminiscent of the popular seperatist anthem Gens du pays that includes the chorus, "C'est à votre tour de vous laisser parler d'amour". The party focused its platform on constitutional change, promising to fight to abolish the federal government's never-used right to disallow any provincial legislation, and stating that each province has a "right to choose its own destiny within Canada". Despite these attempts to win nationalist and separatist votes, the party was reduced to six seats in the House of Commons. The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... David Réal Caouette (September 26, 1917 - December 16, 1976) was a Canadian politician from Quebec. ... Fabien Roy (born April 17, 1928) was a Canadian politician in the 1970s. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Québec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the legislative body of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada. ... Gens du Pays is the unofficial anthem of the Canadian province of Québec. ...


Clark's minority government lasted less than nine months. It was defeated in the House of Commons in a vote of non-confidence over a budget bill that proposed to increase the excise tax on gasoline by 18 cents per Imperial gallon. This resulted in the 1980 election, in which the PCs were defeated by the resurgent Trudeau Liberals. A minority government, or a minority cabinet, is a cabinet of a parliamentary system which does not represent a majority in the parliament — or in bicameral parliaments, in that chamber whose confidence is considered most crucial. ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ...

Popular Vote Map showing bar graphs for seat totals in each province
Popular Vote Map showing bar graphs for seat totals in each province

Download high resolution version (774x608, 47 KB)Popular vote map of Canada, 1979 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (774x608, 47 KB)Popular vote map of Canada, 1979 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

National results

Clark won the popular vote in eight provinces, but because his Tories could only muster 2 seats in Quebec, he only won a minority government. The Liberals won only one seat west of Manitoba. This election was the last in which the Social Credit Party of Canada won seats. An unusual event occurred in the Northwest Territories: the Liberals won the popular vote in the territory, but won neither seat. The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ...

Party Party Leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular Vote
1974 Dissolution Elected % Change # % Change
     Progressive Conservative
Joe Clark
282 95 98 136 +43.2% 4,111,606 35.89% +0.43%
     Liberal
Pierre Trudeau
282 141 133 114 -19.1% 4,595,319 40.11% -3.04%
     New Democratic
Ed Broadbent
282 16 17 26 +62.5% 2,048,988 17.88% +2.45%
     Social Credit
Fabien Roy
103 11 9 6 -45.5% 527,604 4.61% -0.46%
     Rhinoceros
Cornelius I
63     -   62,601 0.55%  
     Independent 48 1 5 - -100% 30,518 0.27% -0.14%
     Unknown 19 - - - - 21,268 0.19% +0.01%
     Union Populaire 69     -   19,514 0.17%  
     Libertarian 60     -   16,042 0.14%  
     Marxist-Leninist
Hardial Bains
144 - - - - 14,231 0.12% -0.05%
     Communist
William Kashtan
71 - - - - 9,141 0.08% -0.05%
     No affiliation 1 - - - - 176 x x
     Vacant 2  
Total 1,424 265 265 282 +6.8% 11,457,008 100.00%  
Sources: http://www.elections.ca History of Federal Ridings since 1867

Notes: The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In parliamentary systems, a dissolution of parliament is the dispersal of a legislature at the call of an election. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Right Honourable Charles Joseph Clark, PC , CC , AOE , MA , LL.D (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 2, 1980. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas current governing political party. ... The Right Honourable Joseph Philippe Pierre Yves Elliott Trudeau PC, CC, CH, QC, MA, LL.D, FRSC (October 18, 1919 – September 28, 2000) was the fifteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 20, 1968 to June 3, 1979, and from March 3, 1980 to June 30, 1984. ... The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique) is a left wing political party in Canada that advocates varying forms of social democracy and democratic socialism. ... The Honourable Dr. John Edward Ed Broadbent, PC , CC , Ph. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... Fabien Roy (born April 17, 1928) was a Canadian politician in the 1970s. ... The Rhinoceros Party of Canada, also known as the Rhinos, was a registered political party in Canada from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... Cornelius the First was a Canadian rhinoceros, from Granby, Quebec, who was the normal leader of the Rhinoceros Party of Canada from 1965 to 1993,and was the leader when the 121 seats 110,000 votes in 1980 was pleasing to there low amount of votes prvious elections, but failed... The Union populaire was a federal political party in Canada that nominated candidates in the 1979 and 1980 federal elections. ... Founded in 1975, the Libertarian Party of Canada adheres to the philosophy of libertarianism, and has been particularly influenced by the ideas of Ayn Rand. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Hardial Bains Hardial Bains (August 15, 1939 – August 24, 1997) was the founder and leader of the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) until his death. ... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ... William Kashtan (1909-1993?) became general secretary of the Communist Party of Canada in January 1965, several months following the death of Leslie Morris. ...


"% change" refers to change from previous election.


x - less than 0.005% of the popular vote.


Results by province

Party Name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL NT YK Total
     Progressive Conservative Seats: 19 21 10 7 57 2 4 8 4 2 1 1 136
     Popular Vote: 44.3 65.6 41.2 43.4 41.8 13.5 40.0 45.4 52.8 29.7 32.3 40.6 35.9
     Liberal Seats: 1 - - 2 32 67 6 2 - 4 - - 114
     Vote: 23.0 22.1 21.8 23.5 36.4 61.7 44.6 35.5 40.6 40.6 34.1 36.4 40.1
     New Democratic Seats: 8 - 4 5 6 - - 1 - 1 1 - 26
     Vote: 31.9 9.9 35.8 32.7 21.1 5.1 15.3 18.7 6.5 29.7 31.9 23.1 17.9
     Social Credit Seats: - - - - - 6             6
     Vote: 0.2 1.0 0.5 0.2 xx 16.0             4.6
Total seats: 28 21 14 14 95 75 10 11 4 7 2 1 282
Parties that won no seats
     Rhinoceros Vote: xx       xx 1.9             0.5
     Independent Vote: 0.2 1.1 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.3     1.6   0.3
     Unknown Vote: 0.1 0.2 xx xx xx 0.5   xx         0.2
     Union Populaire Vote:           0.6             0.2
     Libertarian Vote: xx xx     0.3 0.1     xx       0.1
     Marxist-Leninist Vote: 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2   xx         0.1
     Communist Vote: 0.2 0.1 xx 0.1 0.1 0.1   xx         0.1
     No affiliation Vote: xx xx xx xx xx               xx

xx - less than 0.05% of the popular vote. Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) • Land 925,186 km² • Water 19,549 km² (2. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th) • Land 642,317 km² • Water 19,531 km² (2. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) • Land 591,670 km² • Water 59,366 km² (9. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Glorious and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Area 647,797 km² (8th) • Land 553,556 km² • Water 64,241 km² (14. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th) • Land 917,741 km² • Water 158,654 km² (14. ... The first European explorer of what is now Quebec was Jacques Cartier, who planted a cross either in the Gaspé in 1534 or at Old Fort Bay on the Lower North Shore and sailed into the St. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope was restored) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Bernard Lord (PC) Area 72 908 km² (8th) • Land 71 450 km² • Water 1 458 km² (2. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (One defends and the other conquers) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Lieutenant-Governor Myra Freeman Premier John Hamm (PC) Area 55,283 km² (12th) • Land 53,338 km² • Water 1,946 km² (3. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (The small under the protection of the great) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Area 5,660 km² (13th) • Land 5,660 km² • Water 0 km² (0%) Population (2004) • Population 137,900... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital St. ... Motto: None Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government - no party affiliations) Area 1,346,106 km² (3rd) Land 1,183,085 km² Water 163,021 km² (12. ... Motto: none Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Whitehorse Largest city Whitehorse Commissioner Jack Cable Premier Dennis Fentie (Yukon Party) Area 482,443 km² (9th) • Land 474,391 km² • Water 8,052 km² (1. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas current governing political party. ... The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique) is a left wing political party in Canada that advocates varying forms of social democracy and democratic socialism. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... The Rhinoceros Party of Canada, also known as the Rhinos, was a registered political party in Canada from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... The Union populaire was a federal political party in Canada that nominated candidates in the 1979 and 1980 federal elections. ... Founded in 1975, the Libertarian Party of Canada adheres to the philosophy of libertarianism, and has been particularly influenced by the ideas of Ayn Rand. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ...


Notes

See: 31st Canadian parliament for a full list of MPs elected in this election.
Founded in 1975, the Libertarian Party of Canada adheres to the philosophy of libertarianism, and has been particularly influenced by the ideas of Ayn Rand. ... The Union populaire was a federal political party in Canada that nominated candidates in the 1979 and 1980 federal elections. ... The Rhinoceros Party of Canada, also known as the Rhinos, was a registered political party in Canada from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... The 31st Canadian parliament was a briefly-lived parliament in session from the fall of 1979 until March 1980. ...

Preceded by:
1974 federal election
Canadian federal elections Followed by:
1980 federal election


The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian federal election, 2004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2383 words)
The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons.
On election day, polling times were arranged to allow results from most provinces to be announced more or less simultaneously, with the exception of Atlantic Canada, whose results were known before the close of polling in other provinces.
Although on the eve of the election the party was polling slightly ahead of the Liberals everywhere west of Quebec, it had dropped in support, polling behind or an par with Liberals everywhere except Alberta and British Columbia, where it held onto its traditional support.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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