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Encyclopedia > Canadian federal election, 1945
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The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election
The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election

The Canadian federal election of 1945 was the 20th general election in Canadian history. It was held June 11, 1945 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal government was re-elected to its third consecutive majority government. Image File history File links Cdn1945. ... Image File history File links Cdn1945. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King, PC , LL.B , Ph. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas current governing political party. ...


The federal election was the first since the victory of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation in the Saskatchewan provincial election, and many predicted a major breakthrough for the CCF nationally. The party was expected to win 70 to 100 seats, possibly even enough to form a minority government. Despite the expectations, the party only won 28 seats. The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups as well as the League for Social Reconstruction. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) • Land 591,670 km² • Water 59,366 km² (9. ... A minority government, or a minority cabinet, is a cabinet of a parliamentary system which does not represent a majority in the parliament — or in bicameral parliaments, in that chamber whose confidence is considered most crucial. ...


1945 was also the first test of the newly named Progressive Conservatives. The Conservative Party had changed its name in 1942 when former Progressive Party Premier of Manitoba John Bracken became its leader. The party improved its standing over the old Conservative Party, but fell far short of challenging Liberal hegemony. The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Progressive Party of Manitoba was a political party that developed from the United Farmers of Manitoba, an agrarian movement that became politically active following World War I. A successor to the provinces Grain Growers Association, the UFM represented the interests of farmers frustrated with traditional political parties. ... Categories: Canada-related stubs | Manitoba premiers ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... The name Conservative Party of Canada has been used twice in Canadian history. ...


A key issue in this election seems to have been electing a stable government. The Liberals urged voters to "Return the Mackenzie King Government", and argued that only the Liberal Party had a "preponderence of members in all nine provinces". Mackenzie King threatened to call a new election if he was not given a majority: "We would have confusion to deal with at a time when the world will be in a very disturbed situation. The war in Europe is over, but unrest in the east is not over."


The Progressive Conservatives tried to capitalize on the massive mid-campaign victory by the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party in the 1945 Ontario provincial election. PC campaign ads exhorted voters to rally behind their party: "Ontario shows! Only Bracken can win!", and suggesting that it would be impossible to form a majority government in the country without a plurality of seats in Ontario, which only the Tories could win. In the event, the Liberals fell just short of a majority even though they won only 34 seasts in Ontario to the PCs' 48 seats. Eight "Independent Liberal" MPs could be expected to support the government. The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario, also known as Tories) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario general election of 1945 was held to elect the 90 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ...


Social welfare programs were also an issue in the campaign. Another Liberal slogan encouraged voters to "Build a New Social Order" by endorsing the Liberal platform, which included

  • $750 million to provide land, jobs and business support for veterans;
  • $400 million of public spending to build housing;
  • $250 million for family allowances;
  • establishing an Industrial development Bank;
  • loans to farmers, floor prices for agricultural products;
  • tax reductions.

Campaigning under the slogan, "Work, Security, and Freedom for All -- with the CCF", the CCF promised to retain war-time taxes on high incomes and excess profits in order to fund social servcies, and to abolish the Canadian Senate. The CCF fought hard to prevent the support of labour from going to the Labour Progressive Party (i.e., the Communist Party of Canada). The Senate (French: Sénat) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The Labour-Progressive Party was a Communist party in Canada. ... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ...


The LPP, for its part, pointed out that the CCF's refusal to enter into an electoral pact with the LPP had cost the CCF 100,000 votes in the Ontario election, and had given victory to the Onatrio PCs. It urged voters to "Make Labor (sic) a Partner in Government."


The Social Credit Party of Canada tried, with modest success, to capitalize on the positive image of the Alberta Socred government of William Aberhart, asking voters, "Good Government in Alberta -- Why Not at Ottawa?". Referring to social credit monetary theories, the party encouraged voters to "Vote for the National Dividend". The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... The Social Credit Party of Alberta is a provincial political party in Alberta, Canada that was founded on the social credit monetary policy and conservative Christian social values. ... William Aberhart - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Social Credit is an economic theory and a social movement which started in the early 1920s. ...


National results

Party Party Leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular Vote
1940 Elected % Change # % % Change
     Liberal
Mackenzie King
236 177 118 -33.9% 2,086,545 39.78% -11.54%
     Progressive Conservative1 John Bracken 203 39 66 +66.7% 1,448,744 27.62% -2.79%
     Cooperative Commonwealth M.J. Coldwell 205 8 28 +250% 815,720 15.55% +7.31%
     Social Credit2 Solon Low 93 10 13 +30.0% 212,220 4.05% +1.46%
     Independent Liberal 20 2 8 +300% 93,791 1.79% -1.40%
     Independent 64 1 6 +500% 256,381 4.89% +3.65%
     Bloc Populaire Canadien Maxime Raymond 35 * 2 * 172,765 3.29% *
     Labour Progressive3 Tim Buck 68 - 1   111,892 2.13% +1.94%
     Independent PC 8 * 1 * 14,541 0.28% *
     Independent CCF4 2 * 1 * 6,402 0.12% *
     Liberal-Progressive   1 3 1 -66.7% 6,147 0.12% -0.48%
     National Government5   1   -   4,872 0.09%  
     Trades Union   1 * - * 4,679 0.09% *
     Farmer-Labour   2 - - - 3,620 0.07% -0.11%
     Independent Conservative 1 - - -100% 2,653 0.05% -0.18%
     Democratic W.R.N. Smith 5 * - * 2,603 0.05% *
     Union of Electors   1 * - * 596 0.01% *
     Socialist Labour   2 * - * 459 0.01% *
     Labour   1 - - - 423 0.01% -0.07%
     Liberal-Labour   1 * - * 345 0.01% *
     Independent Labour 1 * - * 241 x *
     Unknown 1 - - - 70 x x
Total 952 243 245 - 5,245,709 100%  
Sources: http://www.elections.ca -- History of Federal Ridings since 1867

Notes: The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas current governing political party. ... The Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King, PC , LL.B , Ph. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... The Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups as well as the League for Social Reconstruction. ... Hon. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... Categories: People stubs | 1900 births | 1962 deaths | Social Credit Party of Canada Leaders ... The Bloc populaire canadien was a political party in the Canadian province of Quebec founded on September 8, 1942 by opponents of conscription during World War II. In the April 27, 1942 national referendum held in Canada, a little more than 70% of Quebec voters refused to free the federal... The Labour-Progressive Party was a Communist party in Canada. ... Timothy (Tim) Buck (January 6, 1891-March 11, 1973) was a long-time leader of the Communist Party of Canada (known from the 1940s until the late 1950s as the Labour Progressive Party). ... Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The Democratic Party of Canada was a short-lived political party in Canada. ... Historically in Quebec, Canada, there was a number of political parties that were part of the Canadian social credit movement. ... The Socialist Labour Party was made up of Canadian supporters of the ideas of Daniel De Leon and the Socialist Labor Party of America. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The Liberal-Labour banner has also been used several times by candidates in Canadian elections: Malcolm Lang, who was elected as a Labour Party of Canada Member of Parliament in the 1926 federal election, was re-elected as Liberal-Labour in the north-eastern Ontario riding of Timiskaming South in...


* The party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.


x - less than 0.005% of the popular vote.


1 1945 Progressive Conservative vote compared to 1940 National Government + Conservative vote.


2 1945 Social Credit vote compared to 1940 New Democracy + Social Credit vote.


3 1945 Labour Progressive vote compared to 1940 Communist vote.


4 The successful "Independent CCF" candidate ran as a People's Cooperative Commonwealth Federation candidate. The Peoples Cooperative Commonwealth Federation was a label used by candidates in elections in the Canadian province of British Columbia who were not endorsed by the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation, but who were supportive of its policies. ...


5 One Progressive Conservative candidate ran under the "National Government" label that the party had used in the 1940 election.


Results by province

Party Name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE YK Total
     Liberal Seats: 5 2 2 9 34 47 7 9 3   118
     Popular Vote: 27.5 21.8 33.0 32.7 40.8 46.5 50.0 45.7 48.4   39.8
     Progressive Conservative Seats: 5 2 1 2 48 1 3 2 1 1 66
     Vote: 30.0 18.7 18.8 24.9 41.4 9.7 38.3 36.8 47.4 40.0 27.6
     Cooperative Commonwealth Seats: 4 - 18 5 - - - 1 - - 28
     Vote: 29.4 18.4 44.4 31.6 14.3 2.4 7.4 16.7 4.2 27.5 15.6
     Social Credit Seats: - 13 - - - -         13
     Vote: 2.3 36.6 3.0 3.2 0.2 4.4         4.0
     Independent Liberal Seats: 1         7 -       8
     Vote: 1.7         5.9 1.1       1.8
     Independent Seats:       - - 6 - -     6
     Vote:       0.8 0.4 16.9 3.2 0.2     4.9
     Bloc populaire Seats:         - 2         2
     Vote:         0.3 11.9         3.3
     Labour Progressive Seats: - - - - - 1   -   - 1
     Vote: 5.9 4.5 0.8 5.0 2.0 1.0   0.6   32.4 2.1
     Independent PC Seats:         - 1         1
     Vote:         xx 1.0         0.3
     Independent CCF Seats: 1         -         1
     Vote: 1.4         xx         0.1
     Liberal-Progressive Seats:       1             1
     Vote:       1.9             0.1
Total Seats 16 17 21 17 82 65 10 12 4 1 245
Parties that won no seats:
     National Government Vote:         0.3           0.1
     Trades Union Vote: 1.1                   0.1
     Farmer-Labour Vote:         0.2           0.1
     Independent Conservative Vote:           0.2         0.1
     Democratic Vote: 0.6                   xx
     Union of Electors Vote:           xx         xx
     Socialist Labour Vote: 0.1                   xx
     Labour Vote:           xx         xx
     Liberal-Labour Vote:           xx         xx
     Independent Labour Vote:         0.1           xx
     Unknown Vote:           xx         xx

xx - less than 0.05% of the popular vote. Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) • Land 925,186 km² • Water 19,549 km² (2. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th) • Land 642,317 km² • Water 19,531 km² (2. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) • Land 591,670 km² • Water 59,366 km² (9. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Glorious and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Area 647,797 km² (8th) • Land 553,556 km² • Water 64,241 km² (14. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th) • Land 917,741 km² • Water 158,654 km² (14. ... The first European explorer of what is now Quebec was Jacques Cartier, who planted a cross either in the Gaspé in 1534 or at Old Fort Bay on the Lower North Shore and sailed into the St. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope was restored) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Bernard Lord (PC) Area 72 908 km² (8th) • Land 71 450 km² • Water 1 458 km² (2. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (One defends and the other conquers) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Lieutenant-Governor Myra Freeman Premier John Hamm (PC) Area 55,283 km² (12th) • Land 53,338 km² • Water 1,946 km² (3. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (The small under the protection of the great) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Area 5,660 km² (13th) • Land 5,660 km² • Water 0 km² (0%) Population (2004) • Population 137,900... Motto: none Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Whitehorse Largest city Whitehorse Commissioner Jack Cable Premier Dennis Fentie (Yukon Party) Area 482,443 km² (9th) • Land 474,391 km² • Water 8,052 km² (1. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas current governing political party. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups as well as the League for Social Reconstruction. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... The Bloc populaire canadien was a political party in the Canadian province of Quebec founded on September 8, 1942 by opponents of conscription during World War II. In the April 27, 1942 national referendum held in Canada, a little more than 70% of Quebec voters refused to free the federal... The Labour-Progressive Party was a Communist party in Canada. ... Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The Democratic Party of Canada was a short-lived political party in Canada. ... Historically in Quebec, Canada, there was a number of political parties that were part of the Canadian social credit movement. ... The Socialist Labour Party was made up of Canadian supporters of the ideas of Daniel De Leon and the Socialist Labor Party of America. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The Liberal-Labour banner has also been used several times by candidates in Canadian elections: Malcolm Lang, who was elected as a Labour Party of Canada Member of Parliament in the 1926 federal election, was re-elected as Liberal-Labour in the north-eastern Ontario riding of Timiskaming South in...



Preceded by:
1940 federal election
Canadian federal elections Followed by:
1949 federal election


The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... ... The Canadian federal election of 1949 was the first election in Canada in almost thirty years in which the Liberals were not led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian federal election results (1940-1959) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (221 words)
Canadian federal election, 1940 - 19th General Election
Canadian federal election, 1945 - 20th General Election
Canadian federal election, 1958 - 24th General Election
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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