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Encyclopedia > Canadian federal election, 1930
The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election
The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election

The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. R.B. Bennett's Conservative Party won a majority government, defeating the Liberal Party led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The initial seat distribution of the 17th Canadian parliament The 17th Canadian parliament was in session from 1930 until 1935. ... For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... In the Westminster System, a majority government is one in which the government enjoys an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or Parliament. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King, PC, LLB, PhD, MA, BA (December 17, 1874 – July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921, to June 28, 1926; September 25, 1926, to August 7, 1930; and October 23, 1935, to November 15, 1948. ...


The first signs of the Great Depression were clearly evident by the 1930 election, and Conservative party leader Richard Bedford Bennett campaigned on a platform of aggressive measures in order to combat it. Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California, centering on Florence Owens Thompson, a mother of seven children, age thirty-two, in Nipomo, California, March 1936. ...

"I propose that any government of which I am the head will at the first session of parliament initiate whatever action is necessary to that end, or perish in the attempt." - R.B. Bennett, June 9, 1930.

Part of the reason for Bennett's success lay in the Liberals' own handling of the rising unemployment of 1930. Touting the Liberal formula as the reason for the economic prosperity of the 1920s, for example, left the Liberals carrying much of the responsibility, whether deserved or not, for the consequences of the crash of the American stock market.


King was apparently oblivious to the rising unemployment that greeted the 1930s, and continued to laud his government's hand in Canada's prosperity. Demands for aid were met with accusations of being the part of a great "Tory conspiracy," which led King to make his famous "five-cent piece" outburst, alienating a growing number of voters. In retrospect, one can try and understand King's reasoning. Both the Western mayors and provincial Premiers who had visited King with requests of relief were overwhelmingly Conservative - in the Premiers' case, seven out of nine. King concluded in Parliamentary debates that though aid was a provincial jurisdiction, the fact that he believed there to be no unemployment problem meant that the requests from the provinces appeared to be nothing more than political grandstanding. The Federal Conservatives had certainly exaggerated the Depression in its early stages solely to attack King's government.


Several other factors entered into King's defeat. Though obtaining funds from sometimes dubious sources was not a problem, the Liberal election machine was not as efficient as it once was, primarily due to the cause of the age and poor health of many chief strategists. King's campaign was the epitome of Murphy's Law - every campaign stop appeared to meet the Prime Minister with some kind of mishap.


By contrast, Bennett's Conservatives were electric. The self-made man who led them had practically rebuilt his party (a significant part of it with his own funds) and developed an election machine which could rival the Liberals'. Aside from superior party organization, the Tories used it. They bought out newspapers in key areas (notably the Liberal strongholds of the West, and Quebec) and ensured that pro-Tory slants were kept. In the first election where radio played an important role, Bennett's vibrant, zealous voice was extremely preferable to King's. (The Tory machine, of course, ensured that only the best radio spots were available to Bennett.) And Bennett's tariff policy - epitomized by his infamous promise to "blast" Canada's way into world markets - was extremely well-received in the key Liberal strongholds of the West and Quebec. In the former, agricultural production had been hurt by worldwide overproduction, and certain agricultural groups in Quebec firmly endorsed Bennett's tariff policy. (Given the devastation experienced by farmers during this time, what else could be done?) Bennett's Conservatives won much of the former Progressive and Farmers' vote in the West, and they were elected with 44% of the popular vote in Quebec as a kind of "protest vote".


All these factors led to Bennett's eventual election.


Canadian voters agreed with Bennett and the Conservatives were elected with a majority of 134 seats in the House Of Commons. The incumbent Liberals under William Lyon Mackenzie King became the official opposition after being reduced to 90, with the Progressives taking only 3. The Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ...

"R. B. Bennett leads the Tories to a smashing federal victory, defeating Mackenzie King's Liberals as voters vent their anger over the depression." - Newspaper headline from July 28, 1930

Unfortunately for Bennett and the Conservatives, the Depression brought complex problems to politicians and extreme hardship for most Canadians. Bennett and the Conservatives lost the 1935 election to the Liberals under the previous Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister A prime minister is a politician who serves as the head of the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ...







National results

Party Party Leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular Vote
1926 Elected % Change # % % Change
     Conservative R.B. Bennett 229 91 134 +69.6% 1,863,115 47.79% +3.07%
     Liberal Mackenzie King 226 116 90 -21.1% 1,716,798 44.03% +1.29%
     United Farmers of Alberta   10 11 9 -18.2% 56,968 1.46% -0.55%
     Progressive   15 11 3 -72.7% 70,822 1.82% -2.41%
     Liberal-Progressive   8 8 3 -62.5% 44,822 1.15% -0.94%
     Labour J.S. Woodsworth 8 4 2 -50.0% 26,548 0.68% -0.95%
     Independent 11 2 2 - 21,608 0.55% -0.30%
     Progressive-Conservative   2 - 1   15,996 0.41% +0.18%
     Independent Labour 2 * 1 * 15,988 0.41% *
     Independent Liberal 8 1 - -100% 14,426 0.37% -0.25%
     Farmer   5 * - * 11,999 0.31% *
     Independent Conservative 6 - - - 10,360 0.27% -0.07%
     Unknown 2 - - - 7,441 0.19% +0.08%
     Liberal-Labour   1 - - - 7,195 0.18% +0.05%
     Communist Tim Buck 6 * - * 4,557 0.12% *
     Labour-Farmer   2 - - - 3,276 0.08% +0.04%
     Liberal-Protectionist   1 * - * 2,723 0.07% *
     Farmer-Labour   1 * - * 2,091 0.05% *
     Independent Progressive 1 * - * 1,294 0.03% *
     Franc Lib   1 * - * 429 0.01% *
     Prohibitionist   1 * - * 266 0.01% *
Total 546 245 245 - 3,898,722 100%  
Sources: http://www.elections.ca -- History of Federal Ridings since 1867

Note: The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King, PC, LLB, PhD, MA, BA (December 17, 1874 – July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921, to June 28, 1926; September 25, 1926, to August 7, 1930; and October 23, 1935, to November 15, 1948. ... The United Farmers of Alberta was founded in 1909 as a lobby organization representing the interests of farmers. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... J.S. Woodsworth James Shaver Woodsworth (July 29, 1874 – March 21, 1942) was a pioneer in the Canadian social democratic movement. ... The label Progressive-Conservative was used by some candidates for the Canadian House of Commons in the 1925 , 1926 , 1930 and 1935 federal elections. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... The Liberal-Labour banner has also been used several times by candidates in Canadian elections: Malcolm Lang, who was elected as a Labour Party of Canada Member of Parliament in the 1926 federal election, was re-elected as Liberal-Labour in the north-eastern Ontario riding of Timiskaming South in... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ... Timothy (Tim) Buck (January 6, 1891-March 11, 1973) was a long-time leader of the Communist Party of Canada (known from the 1940s until the late 1950s as the Labour Progressive Party). ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of promoting favored domestic industries through the use of high tariffs and other regulations to discourage imports. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... This article is about the prohibition of alcoholic beverages; separate articles on the prohibition of drugs in general and writs of prohibition are also available. ...


* The party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.


Results by province

Party Name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE YK Total
     Conservative Seats: 7 4 6 10 59 24 10 10 3 1 134
     Popular Vote (%): 49.3% 35.0% 33.6% 44.1% 53.9% 43.7% 59.3% 52.5% 50.0% 60.3% 47.8%
     Liberal Seats: 5 3 13 1 22 40 1 4 1 - 90
     Vote: 40.9% 30.0% 48.4% 19.6% 42.4% 53.2% 40.7% 47.5% 50.0% 39.7% 44.0%
     UF Alberta Seats:   9                 9
     Vote:   28.4%                 1.5%
     Progressive Seats:   - 2 - 1           3
     Vote:   1.9% 8.1% 6.4% 1.8%           1.8%
     Liberal-Progressive Seats:     - 3             3
     Vote:     2.1% 16.2%             1.2%
     Labour Seats:   -   2 -            
     Vote:   3.0   8.4 0.1           0.7
     Independent Seats: 1   -   - 1         2
     Vote: 2.6   3.5   0.1 0.3         0.6
     Progressive-Conservative Seats:       1   -         1
     Vote:     2.7   1.0         0.4
     Independent Labour Seats: 1     -             1
     Vote: 6.5     0.1             0.4
Total Seats 14 16 21 17 82 65 11 14 4 1 245
Parties that won no seats:
     Independent Liberal Vote:       0.4   1.3         0.4
     Farmer Vote:     3.6               0.3
     Independent Conservative Vote:       1.2 0.5 0.1          
     Unknown Vote:       0.5           0.2
     Liberal-Labour Vote:         0.5           0.2
     Communist Vote: 0.4     0.9 0.1           0.1
     Labour-Farmer Vote :   0.6                 0.1
     Liberal-Protectionist Vote:           0.3         0.1
     Farmer-Labour Vote:     0.6               0.1
     Independent Progressive Vote:           0.1         xx
     Franc Lib Vote: 0.2                   xx
     Prohibitionist Vote: 0.1                   xx


Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages English Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 36 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 5th 944,735 km² 2. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 2. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 7th 651,036 km² 9. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 8th 647,797 km² 14. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English, French (in some areas) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 4th 1,076,395... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 75 24 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 2nd 1,542,056 km² 11. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Official languages English, French Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Bernard Lord (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 10 10 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 11th 72 908 km² 2. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Official languages English Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Lieutenant-Governor Myra Freeman Premier John Hamm (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 11 10 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 12th 55,283 km² 3. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (Latin: The small under the protection of the great) Official languages English Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 4 4 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 13th 5,660 km² 0% Population  - Total... Motto: none Official languages English Capital Whitehorse Largest city Whitehorse Commissioner Geraldine Van Bibber Premier Dennis Fentie (Yukon Party) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 1 1 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 9th 482,443 km² 1. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The United Farmers of Alberta was founded in 1909 as a lobby organization representing the interests of farmers. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The label Progressive-Conservative was used by some candidates for the Canadian House of Commons in the 1925 , 1926 , 1930 and 1935 federal elections. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... The Liberal-Labour banner has also been used several times by candidates in Canadian elections: Malcolm Lang, who was elected as a Labour Party of Canada Member of Parliament in the 1926 federal election, was re-elected as Liberal-Labour in the north-eastern Ontario riding of Timiskaming South in... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... There have been various groups in Canada who have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... This article is about the prohibition of alcoholic beverages; separate articles on the prohibition of drugs in general and writs of prohibition are also available. ...

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Federal political parties | Federal electoral districts Elections in Canada provides information on elections and election results in Canada. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1867 election The 1867 federal election, which proved how much canada sucks ended on September 20th, was the first election for the new . ... Politics of Canada Categories: Stub | Canadian federal elections ... The Canadian federal election of 1874 was held on January 22, 1874. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election The Canadian federal election of 1878 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1882 election The Canadian federal election of 1882 was held on June 20, 1882 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1887 election The Canadian federal election of 1887 was held on February 22, 1887 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 1891 Canadian federal election was won by the Conservative Party of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1896 election The Canadian federal election of 1896 was held on July 11, 1896 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1900 election The Canadian federal election of 1900 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1908 election The Canadian federal election of 1908 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1921 election The Canadian federal election of 1921 was held on December 6, 1921 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election The Canadian federal election of 1945 was the 20th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian federal election of 1949 was the first election in Canada in almost thirty years in which the Liberals were not led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. ... National results Notes: (1) The Liberal-Labour MP sat with the Liberal caucus. ... The Canadian federal election of 1957 was held June 10, 1957. ... The 24th general election was held just nine months after the 23rd and transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbakers minority into the largest ever majority government in Canadian history. ... When the Canadian federal election of 1962 was called, the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada of John George Diefenbaker had governed for almost five years with the largest majority in the House of Commons in Canadian history. ... The Canadian federal election of 1963 resulted in the defeat of the minority Progressive Conservative government of John George Diefenbaker. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1965, the Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of June 25, 1968, the Liberal Party won a majority government under its new leader, Pierre Trudeau. ... The House of Commons after the 1972 election The Canadian federal election of 1972 was held on October 30, 1972 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8, 1974 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1979 election The Canadian federal election of 1979 was held on May 22, 1979 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories PC leader Kim Campbell. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The initial seat distribution of the 1st Canadian parliament The 1st Canadian parliament was in session from November 6, 1867 until July 8, 1872. ... British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Two MPs recontested their seats in byelections, and were reelected. ... Contents // Categories: Canada government stubs | Canadian parliaments ... The initial seat distribution of the 4th Canadian parliament The 4th Canadian parliament was in session from 1878 until 1882. ... The initial seat distribution of the 5th Canadian parliament The 5th Canadian parliament was in session from 1882 until 1887. ... The initial seat distribution of the 6th Canadian parliament The 6th Canadian parliament was in session from 1887 until 1891. ... The 7th Canadian parliament was in session from 1891 until 1896. ... The initial seat distribution of the 8th Canadian parliament The 8th Canadian parliament was in session from 1896 until 1900. ... The initial seat distribution of the 9th Canadian parliament The 9th Canadian parliament was in session from 1900 until 1904. ... The initial seat distribution of the 10th Canadian parliament The 10th Canadian parliament was in session from 1904 until 1908. ... The initial seat distribution of the 11th Canadian parliament The 11th Canadian parliament was in session from 1908 until 1911. ... The initial seat distribution of the 12th Canadian parliament The 12th Canadian parliament was in session from 1911 until 1917. ... The initial seat distribution of the 13th Canadian parliament The 13th Canadian parliament was in session from 1917 until 1921. ... The initial seat distribution of the 14th Canadian parliament The 14th Canadian parliament was in session from 1921 until 1925. ... The initial seat distribution of the 15th Canadian parliament The 15th Canadian parliament was in session from 1925 until 1926. ... The initial seat distribution of the 16th Canadian parliament The 16th Canadian parliament was in session from 1926 until 1930. ... The initial seat distribution of the 17th Canadian parliament The 17th Canadian parliament was in session from 1930 until 1935. ... The initial seat distribution of the 18th Canadian parliament The 18th Canadian parliament was in session from 1935 until 1940. ... The initial seat distribution of the 19th Canadian parliament The 19th Canadian parliament was in session from 1940 until 1945. ... The 20th Canadian parliament was in session from 1945 until 1949. ... The 21st Canadian parliament was in session from 1949 until 1953. ... The 22nd Canadian parliament was in session from 1953 until 1957. ... The 23rd Canadian parliament was in session from 1957 until 1958. ... The 24th Canadian parliament was in session from 1958 until 1962. ... The 25th Canadian parliament was in session from 1962 until 1963. ... The 26th Canadian parliament was in session from 1963 until 1965. ... The 27th Canadian parliament was in session from 1965 until 1968. ... The initial seat distribution of the 28th Canadian parliament The 28th Canadian parliament was in session from 1968 until 1972. ... The initial seat distribution of the 29th Canadian parliament The 29th Canadian parliament was in session from 1972 until 1974. ... The initial seat distribution of the 30th Canadian parliament The 30th Canadian parliament was in session from 1974 until 1979. ... The 31st Canadian parliament was a briefly-lived parliament in session from the fall of 1979 until March 1980. ... The 32nd Canadian parliament was in session from March 1980 until June 1984. ... The 33rd Canadian parliament was in session from 1984 until 1988. ... The 34th Canadian parliament was in session from 1988 until 1993. ... The 35th Canadian parliament was in session from 1993 until 1997. ... The 36th Canadian parliament was in session from 1997 until 2000. ... 37th Parliament * - formerly a member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada ** - formerly a member of the Canadian Alliance Party Categories: Canadian parliaments ... The initial seat distribution of the 38th Canadian parliament The 38th Canadian parliament was in session from October 5, 2004 (elected June 28) until November 29, 2005. ... The 39th Canadian parliament was elected on January 23, 2006, in the 2006 federal election. ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... This is a list of Canadas 308 electoral districts (also known as ridings in Canadian English) as defined by the 2003 Representation Order, which came into effect on May 23, 2004. ...

xx - less than 0.05% of the popular vote



Preceded by:
1926 federal election
Canadian federal elections Followed by:
1935 federal election

  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian federal election, 1930 - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (900 words)
The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons.
Though obtaining funds from sometimes dubious sources was not a problem, the Liberal election machine was not as efficient as it once was, primarily due to the cause of the age and poor health of many chief strategists.
Canadian voters agreed with Bennett and the Conservatives were elected with a majority of 134 seats in the House Of Commons.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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