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Encyclopedia > Canadian dollar
Canadian dollar
dollar canadien (French)
Fifty dollar bill One dollar coin
Fifty dollar bill One dollar coin
ISO 4217 Code CAD
User(s) Canada
Inflation 2%
Source The World Factbook, 2006 est.
Subunit
1/100 cent (English) and (French)
Symbol $ or C$
cent (English) and (French) ¢
Nickname loonie, buck (English)
huard, piastre (pronounced piasse in popular usage) (French)
cent (English) and (French) penny (English)
sou (French)
Coins
Freq. used , , 10¢, 25¢, $1, $2
Rarely used 50¢
Banknotes
Freq. used $5, $10, $20, $50, $100
Issuing authority Bank of Canada
Website www.bankofcanada.ca
Printer Canadian Bank Note Company, BA International Inc.
Mint Royal Canadian Mint
Website www.mint.ca

The dollar (ISO 4217 code: CAD) is the currency of Canada. It is normally abbreviated with the dollar sign $, or C$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies.[1] It is divided into 100 cents. ISO 4217 Code NIO User(s) Nicaragua Inflation 9. ... Image File history File links Canadian $50, Front Source: Bank of Canada File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Loonie_reverse_view. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... $ redirects here. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... See also loony (nicknamed for loon), which is sometimes spelled loonie. Loonie is the name Canadians gave the gold-coloured, bronze-plated, one-dollar coin shortly after its introduction. ... Buck may refer to any of the following: Look up Buck in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Huard could refer to: Brock Huard Camille Huard Damon Huard the French slang word for a Canadian dollar, from the translation of the loonie. ... A 100 piastre note from French Indochina, circa 1954. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... For the NBA basketball player with the nickname see Penny Hardaway A variety of low value coins, including an Irish 2p piece and many U.S. pennies. ... A solidus (the Latin word for solid) was originally a gold coin issued by the Romans. ... 25¢ Coin (Quarter) - Obverse. ... In Canada, a penny is a coin worth one cent or 1100 of a dollar. ... A Canadian nickel is a coin worth five cents, patterned on the corresponding coin in the neighbouring United States, and introduced in Canada in 1922. ... In Canada a dime is a coin worth ten cents. ... The quarter is a Canadian coin, valued at 25 cents or one-fourth of a Canadian dollar. ... See also loony (nicknamed for loon), which is sometimes spelled loonie. Loonie is the name Canadians gave the gold-coloured, bronze-plated, one-dollar coin shortly after its introduction. ... Toonie (sometimes spelled twoonie or twonie) is the nickname Canadians collectively gave their two-dollar coin; it is a portmanteau word combining the number two with the name of the loonie, Canadas one-dollar coin. ... The 50 cent piece is the common name of the Canadian coin worth 50 cents. ... Canadian banknotes are the banknotes of Canada, denominated in Canadian dollars (CAD). ... Canadian $5, front Canadian $5, back The Canadian five-dollar bill is one of the most common banknotes of Canadian currency. ... Canadian $10, front Canadian $10, back The Canadian ten-dollar bill is one of the most common banknotes of Canadian currency. ... Front of $20 bill Back of $20 bill The Canadian $20 bill is one of the most common banknotes of Canadian currency. ... Canadian $50, front Canadian $50, back The Canadian $50 bill is one of five different banknotes of Canadian currency. ... The Canadian $100 bill is one of five different banknotes of Canadian currency. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        The ECB building in Frankfurt A central bank, reserve bank or... For the defunct commercial bank, see Bank of Canada (commercial). ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... The Canadian Bank Note Company is responsible for printing Canadas paper currency. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... Mint flag The Royal Canadian Mint (RCM, french Monnaie royale canadienne) produces all of Canadas circulation coins, and manufactures circulation coins on behalf of other nations. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... $ redirects here. ... This article is about the type of currency. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ...

Contents

History

Spanish dollar

The first dollars used in Canada were Spanish dollars: 8 reales coins issued by Spain and its colonies. [1] Because the colonies used the £sd system for accounting (see Canadian pound), it was necessary to set a valuation or rating for the Spanish dollar in £sd. Different ratings were used in the different colonies. The Halifax rating was introduced c.1750 and was the most commonly used in the northern colonies. It valued the Spanish dollar at 5 shillings (the value of the silver in the coin was equal to 4 shillings 6 pence, the "London rating"). The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, weight) is a silver coin that was minted in the Spanish Empire after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. ... The real was a unit of currency in Spain for several centuries. ... £sd (pronounced, and sometimes written, LSD) was the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies used in the United Kingdom, and in most of its Empire and colonies. ... The pound was the currency in Canada until the colonies decimalized between 1858 and 1871. ... The Halifax rating was a valuation of the Spanish dollar in the £sd accounting system. ... This article is about coinage. ...


After the American War of Independence, United Empire Loyalists, settling in Upper Canada (Ontario), brought the York rating (named after New York) of 1 Spanish dollar = 8 shillings. This was officially outlawed (in favour of the Halifax rating) in 1796 but continued to be used well into the 19th century. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... The York rating was a valuation of the Spanish dollar in the £sd accounting system. ... This article is about the state. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the 19th century, many local banknotes were issued denominated in £sd, dollars, or both. The Bank of Montreal issued notes denominated in dollars in 1817, whereas the Atlantic colonies, with stronger ties to Britain and weaker ones to the United States, preferred the £sd system. Some dollar denominated banknotes bore a depiction of the Spanish dollar coin(s) they were equal to. However, few coins were issued, as the British authorities were unwilling to allow the colonies to mint their own coins. Various bank tokens were issued in denominations of ½ and 1 penny. BMO redirects here. ...


In the French speaking parts of Canada (Lower Canada, formerly New France, later Quebec), the £sd and dollar system swiftly replaced the livre following the conquest by Britain. The main unit of currency was called the piastre on some French language banknotes, and the word survives in French-Canadian vernacular as an alternative for "dollar". Some bank tokens were issued in denominations of 1 and 2 sous, equal to ½ and 1 penny. Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... This article is about the Canadian province. ... The livre was the currency of New France, the French colonies of North America. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... A solidus (the Latin word for solid) was originally a gold coin issued by the Romans. ...


Gold dollar

In 1841, the new Province of Canada declared that its dollar was equal to the gold U.S. dollar and was worth 5 shillings in local currency. The silver Spanish dollars were rated at 5 shillings 1 penny and the British sovereign was rated at 1 pound 4 shillings 4 pence, the proper value due to its gold content compared to that of the gold U.S. dollar. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Three Gold Sovereigns with a Krugerrand A Gold Sovereign is a British gold coin, first issued in 1489 for Henry VII, generally with a value of one pound sterling. ...


Independent Canadian dollar

The Province of Canada declared that all accounts would be kept in dollars and cents as of January 1, 1858, and ordered the issue of the first official Canadian coins in the same year. The dollar was pegged at par with the U.S. dollar, on a gold standard of 1 dollar = 23.22 grains gold. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... A grain (symbol: grd) is a unit of mass equal to about 64. ...


The colonies that came together in the Canadian Confederation progressively adopted a decimal system over the next few years. New Brunswick, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island adopted dollars equivalent to the Canadian dollar (see New Brunswick dollar, British Columbia dollar and Prince Edward Island dollar). However, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland did not adopt the same dollar (see Nova Scotian dollar and Newfoundland dollar). Nova Scotia retained its own currency until 1871, but Newfoundland issued its own currency until joining Confederation in 1949, although the value of the Newfoundland dollar was adjusted in 1895 to make it equal to the Canadian dollar. We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... This article is about the Canadian province. ... The dollar was the currency of New Brunswick between 1861 and 1867. ... The dollar was the currency of British Columbia between 1865 and 1871. ... The dollar was the currency of Prince Edward Island between 1871 and 1873. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The dollar was the currency of Nova Scotia between 1861 and 1871. ... ISO 4217 Code NFD User(s) Newfoundland Subunit 1/100 1/50 cent pence Symbol $ or NF$ cent pence ¢ p Coins Freq. ...

Currencies used in Canada
Currency Dates in use Value in British pounds Value in Canadian dollars
Canadian pound 1841-1858 16s 5.3d $4
Canadian dollar 1858- 4s 1.3d $1
New Brunswick dollar 1860-1867
British Columbia dollar 1865-1871
Prince Edward Island dollar 1871-1873
Nova Scotian dollar 1860-1871 4s $0.973
Newfoundland dollar 1865-1895 4s 2d $1.014
1895-1949 4s 1.3d $1

The Federal Parliament passed the Uniform Currency Act in April 1871, tying up loose ends as to the currencies of the various provinces and replacing them with a common Canadian dollar. The gold standard was temporarily abandoned during the First World War and definitively abolished on April 10, 1933. At the outbreak of the Second World War, the exchange rate to the U.S. dollar was fixed at 1.1 Canadian dollars = 1 U.S. dollar. This was changed to parity in 1946. In 1949, sterling was devalued and Canada followed, returning to a peg of 1.1 Canadian dollars = 1 U.S. dollar. However, Canada allowed its dollar to float in 1950, only returning to a fixed exchange rate in 1962, when the dollar was pegged at 1 Canadian dollar = 0.925 U.S. dollar. This peg lasted until 1970, since when it has floated. For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ... The pound was the currency in Canada until the colonies decimalized between 1858 and 1871. ... The dollar was the currency of New Brunswick between 1861 and 1867. ... The dollar was the currency of British Columbia between 1865 and 1871. ... The dollar was the currency of Prince Edward Island between 1871 and 1873. ... The dollar was the currency of Nova Scotia between 1861 and 1871. ... ISO 4217 Code NFD User(s) Newfoundland Subunit 1/100 1/50 cent pence Symbol $ or NF$ cent pence ¢ p Coins Freq. ... For other uses, see Gold standard (disambiguation). ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Terminology

Canadian English, like American English, uses the slang term "buck" for a dollar. Because of the appearance of the common loon on the back of the dollar coin that replaced the dollar bill in 1987, the word "loonie" was adopted in Canadian parlance to distinguish the Canadian dollar from other currencies, as in "The loonie performed well today on currency markets". When the two-dollar coin was introduced in 1996, the derivative word "toonie" became the common word for it in Canadian English slang. Canadian English (CanE) is the variety of North American English used in Canada. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... This article is about the type of currency. ... Binomial name Gavia immer (Brunnich, 1764) The Great Northern Diver, known in North America as the Common Loon (Gavia immer), is a large member of the loon, or diver, family. ... See also loony (nicknamed for loon), which is sometimes spelled loonie. Loonie is the name Canadians gave the gold-coloured, bronze-plated, one-dollar coin shortly after its introduction. ... Toonie (sometimes spelled twoonie or twonie) is the nickname Canadians collectively gave their two-dollar coin; it is a portmanteau word combining the number two with the name of the loonie, Canadas one-dollar coin. ...


In French, the currency is also called le dollar; Canadian French slang terms include piastre or piasse (same as "buck," but the original word used in eighteenth-century French to translate "dollar") and huard (equivalent to "loonie", since huard is French for "loon," the bird appearing on the coin). The French pronunciation cent (pronounced cenne, not like the word for hundred) is generally used for the subdivision; sou is another, informal term. Canadian French is an umbrella term for the dialects or varieties of French found in Canada [1] and areas of French Canadian settlement in the United States. ... A 100 piastre note from French Indochina, circa 1954. ...


Coins

In 1858, bronze 1 cent and .925 silver 5, 10 and 20 cents coins were issued by the Province of Canada. Except for 1 cent coins struck in 1859, no more coins were issued until 1870, when production of the 5 and 10 cents was resumed and silver 25 and 50 cents were introduced. Between 1908 and 1919, sovereigns (legal tender in Canada for 4.866 dollars) were struck in Ottawa with a "C" mintmark. Gold 5 and 10 dollars coins were issued between 1912 and 1914. 25¢ Coin (Quarter) - Obverse. ... Three Gold Sovereigns with a Krugerrand A Gold Sovereign is a British gold coin, first issued in 1489 for Henry VII, generally with a value of one pound sterling. ...


In 1920, the size of the 1 cent was reduced and the silver fineness was reduced to .800. In 1922, the silver 5 cent was replaced by a larger, nickel coin. In 1935, a silver 1 dollar coin was introduced. In 1942, as a war-time measure, nickel was replaced by tombac in the 5 cent coin, which was changed from round to dodecagonal. Chromium-plated steel was used for the 5 cents between 1944 and 1945 and between 1951 and 1954, before nickel was permanently readopted. The 5 cents returned to a round shape in 1963. Tombac is an alloy of copper and zinc. ...

Canadian 2 dollar coin, "toonie"
Canadian 2 dollar coin, "toonie"

In 1968, .500 silver 10 and 25 cents coins were issued, before silver was replaced by nickel. At the same time, the sizes of the 50 cents and 1 dollar coins were reduced. In 1982, the 1 cent coin was changed to dodecagonal and the 5 cents was switched to a cupro-nickel alloy. In 1987, a 1 dollar coin struck in aureate-plated nickel was introduced. A bimetallic 2 dollars coin followed in 1996. In 1997, copper-plated zinc replaced bronze in the 1 cent. This was followed, in 2000, by the introduction of plated-steel 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents coins, with the 1 cent plated in copper and the others plated in cupro-nickel. Canadian two-dollar coin (toonie), reverse, 2004, high-res File links The following pages link to this file: Toonie Categories: Currency images ... Canadian two-dollar coin (toonie), reverse, 2004, high-res File links The following pages link to this file: Toonie Categories: Currency images ... thermocouple and Peltier_Seebeck effect. ...


Coins are produced by the Royal Canadian Mint in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and currently issued in denominations of 1¢ (penny), 5¢ (nickel), 10¢ (dime), 25¢ (quarter), 50¢ (50 cent piece) (though the 50 cent piece is rarely used), $1 (loonie), and $2 (toonie). The standard set of designs has Canadian symbols, usually wildlife, on the reverse, and an effigy of Elizabeth II on the obverse. However, some pennies, nickels, and dimes remain in circulation that bear the effigy of George VI. Commemorative coins with differing reverses are also issued on an irregular basis. 50 cent coins are rarely found in circulation; they are often collected and not regularly used in day-to-day transactions. There have been repeated talks about removing the penny from circulation as it is estimated that it costs the Royal Canadian Mint up to four cents to produce and distribute a one-cent coin.[2] The Canadian penny costs at least C$130 million annually to keep in circulation, estimates a financial institution that called for an end to the penny.[3] A 2007 survey shows that only 37% of Canadians use pennies but the government continues to produce about 816 million pennies per year, equal to 25 pennies per Canadian.[3] Mint flag The Royal Canadian Mint (RCM, french Monnaie royale canadienne) produces all of Canadas circulation coins, and manufactures circulation coins on behalf of other nations. ... For other uses, see Winnipeg (disambiguation). ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... In Canada, a penny is a coin worth one cent or 1100 of a dollar. ... A Canadian nickel is a coin worth five cents, patterned on the corresponding coin in the neighbouring United States, and introduced in Canada in 1922. ... In Canada a dime is a coin worth ten cents. ... The quarter is a Canadian coin, valued at 25 cents or one-fourth of a Canadian dollar. ... The 50 cent piece is the common name of the Canadian coin worth 50 cents. ... See also loony (nicknamed for loon), which is sometimes spelled loonie. Loonie is the name Canadians gave the gold-coloured, bronze-plated, one-dollar coin shortly after its introduction. ... Toonie (sometimes spelled twoonie or twonie) is the nickname Canadians collectively gave their two-dollar coin; it is a portmanteau word combining the number two with the name of the loonie, Canadas one-dollar coin. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ...


Banknotes

Latest series of Canadian Banknotes
Latest series of Canadian Banknotes

The first paper money issued in Canada denominated in dollars were British Army Bills, issued between 1813 and 1815 in denominations between 1 and 400 dollars. These were emergency issues due to the War of 1812. The first banknotes were issued in 1817 by the Montreal Bank. Large numbers of chartered banks were founded in the 1830s, 1850s, 1860s and 1870s, although many issued paper money for only a short time. Others, including the Montreal Bank (later called the Bank of Montreal), issued notes for several decades. Until 1858, many notes were issued denominated in both shillings/pounds and dollars (5 shillings = 1 dollar). A large number of different denominations were issued, including 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 40, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 dollars. After 1858, only dollar denominations were used. See Canadian chartered bank notes for more information. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (342x773, 56 KB) Image of current denominations of Canadian Banknotes (C) 2006, Bank of Canada. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (342x773, 56 KB) Image of current denominations of Canadian Banknotes (C) 2006, Bank of Canada. ... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... BMO redirects here. ... The Canadian chartered bank notes were paper money issued between 1817 and 1944 by private Canadian banks known as chartered banks. ...


After its establishment in 1841, the Province of Canada began issuing paper money. Notes were produced for the government by the Bank of Montreal between 1842 and 1862, in denominations of 4, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 dollars. In 1866, the Province of Canada began issuing its own paper money, in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 dollars. In 1870, following Confederation, the Dominion of Canada introduced 25 cents notes along with new issues of 1, 2, 500 and 1000 dollars. 50 and 100 dollars notes followed in 1872 but the bulk of later government note production was of 1 and 2 dollars note, with 4 dollars added in 1882. Denominations of 500, 1000, 5000 and 50,000 dollars were issued after 1896 for bank transactions only.


The Bank Act of 1871 limited the smallest denomination the chartered banks could issue to 4 dollars, increased to 5 dollars in 1880. To facilitate purchases below 5 dollars without using Dominion notes, Molsons Bank issued 6 and 7 dollars notes in 1871. The government issued 5 dollars notes from 1912. The last 25 cents notes, known as shinplasters due to their small size, were dated 1923. This BMO branch in Waterloo, Ontario retains the Molsons Bank name on the plinth. ...


In 1935, with only ten chartered banks still issuing notes, the Bank of Canada was founded and began issuing notes in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 dollars. In 1944, the chartered banks were prohibited from issuing their own currency, with the Royal Bank of Canada and the Bank of Montreal among the last to issue notes. The Royal Bank of Canada (TSX: RY, NYSE: RY) is Canadas largest company. ...


Although the 1 dollar coin was introduced in 1935, it was not until the introduction of the "loonie" that the banknote was withdrawn from circulation. The 2 dollar note was also replaced by a coin in 1996. All banknotes are currently printed by the Canadian Bank Note Company and BA International Inc on behalf of the Bank of Canada. The Canadian Bank Note Company is responsible for printing Canadas paper currency. ... For the defunct commercial bank, see Bank of Canada (commercial). ...


Value

Unlike other currencies in the Bretton Woods system whose values were fixed, the Canadian dollar was allowed to float from 1950 to 1962. From 1952 to 1960, the Canadian dollar traded at a slight premium over the U.S. dollar, reaching a high of US$1.0614 on 20 August 1957. Image File history File links CAD_USD_Exchange_Rates. ... Image File history File links CAD_USD_Exchange_Rates. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A fixed exchange rate, sometimes (less commonly) called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. ... A floating exchange rate or a flexible exchange rate is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is allowed to fluctuate according to the foreign exchange market. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Canadian dollar fell considerably after 1960, and this contributed to Prime Minister John Diefenbaker's defeat in the 1963 election. The Canadian dollar returned to a fixed exchange rate regime in 1962 when its value was set at about US$0.925, where it remained until 1970. As an inflation-fighting measure, the Canadian dollar was allowed to float in 1970. Its value appreciated and it was worth more than the U.S. dollar for part of the 1970s. The high point was on 25 April 1974, when it reached US$1.0443. John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... Map of Canadas provinces and territories and which party won the most votes in each province and territory and their popular vote. ... A fixed exchange rate, sometimes (less commonly) called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


The Canadian dollar fell in value against its American counterpart during the technological boom of the 1990s that was centred on the United States, and was traded for as little as 61.79 cents U.S. on 21 January 2002, which was an all-time low. [4] Since then, its value against all major currencies has risen due, in part, to high prices for commodities (especially oil) that Canada exports. Its value against the U.S. dollar rose sharply in 2007 due to the continued strength of the Canadian economy, and to the U.S. currency's recent weakness on world markets. During trading on 20 September 2007 it met the U.S. greenback at parity for the first time since 25 November 1976 .[5] The dot-com bubble was a speculative bubble covering roughly 1995–2001 during which stock markets in Western nations saw their value increase rapidly from growth in the new Internet sector and related fields. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Petro redirects here. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Inflation in the value of the Canadian dollar was fairly low since the 1990s, but had been severe for some decades before that. In 2007 the Canadian dollar rebounded remarkably, soaring 23% in value before reaching parity with, and then surpassing, the U.S. dollar in September of that year. On November 7, 2007, it surpassed the $1.10 mark at $1.1030 U.S. in morning trading before slipping back to $1.093 by 10:00 AM Eastern time, after China announced it will diversify its $1.43 trillion US of foreign exchange reserves away from the U.S. dollar.


Since 84.2% of Canada's exports go to the United States, and 56.7% of imports into Canada come from the United States,[6] Canadians are mainly interested in the value of their currency against the United States dollar (USD). USD redirects here. ...


On 28 September 2007, the Canadian dollar closed above the U.S. dollar for the first time in 30 years, trading at US$1.0052 [7] and on November 7, 2007, it hit US$1.1024 during trading, a modern-day high.[8] (it has been as high as US$2.78, which was reached on 11 July 1864 after the United States had temporarily abandoned the gold standard) is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


On world markets, the Canadian dollar historically tended to move in tandem with the U.S. dollar, but less dramatically. A consequence is that at times an apparently rising Canadian dollar is often falling against most of the world's currencies, and vice-versa. However, during the relatively sharp rise of the Canadian dollar since 2002, it has "parted ways" with the U.S. dollar and has gained value against it, while also rising against other major international currencies.


Although there was a great deal of domestic concern when the Canadian dollar was trading much lower than the U.S. dollar, there is also concern among exporters when the dollar appreciates quickly. The rapid rise in the value of the Canadian dollar increases the price of Canadian exports to the United States, which make up a large part of the economy. On the other hand, Canadian industry enjoys advantages from a rising dollar, primarily in that it is cheaper to purchase foreign material and businesses. The Bank of Canada has no specific target value for the Canadian dollar and has not intervened in foreign exchange markets since 1998.[9] The Bank's current position is that market conditions should determine the worth of the Canadian dollar. The foreign exchange (currency or forex or FX) market exists wherever one currency is traded for another. ...


As of November 30, the Canadian dollar is once again worth less than the American dollar


Reserve currency

A number of central banks keep Canadian dollars as a reserve currency. The Canadian dollar is considered to be a benchmark currency.[10] Percentage of global currencies A reserve currency (or anchor currency) is a currency which is held in significant quantities by many governments and institutions as part of their foreign exchange reserves. ...

Current CAD exchange rates
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See also

Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Canada is one of the worlds wealthiest nations, and a member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and Group of Eight (G8). ...

References

  1. ^ There are various common abbreviations to distinguish the Canadian dollar from others: while the ISO currency code CAD (a three-character code without monetary symbols) is common, no single system is universally accepted. C$ is recommended by the Canadian government (e.g., per The Canadian Style guide) and is used by the International Monetary Fund, while Editing Canadian English indicates Can$ and CDN$; both guides note the ISO scheme/code. The abbreviation CA$ is also used, e.g., in some software packages.
  2. ^ Chande, Dinu; Fisher, Timothy. Have a Penny? Need a Penny? (.PDF) (French/English). economics.ca. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  3. ^ a b Agence France Presse. "Financial group lobbies for 'penny-less' Canadian economy", Yahoo! Canada News, 15 Feb 2007. Retrieved on 2007-02-26. 
  4. ^ oanda.com. Historical exchange rate of CAD to USD from 21 December 2001 to 21 February 2002. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  5. ^ "Topsy-turvy world last time loonie was on par with greenback", Canadian Press, 2007-09-20. Retrieved on 2007-09-21. 
  6. ^ Central Intelligence Agency. The World Factbook - Canada. Retrieved on 2007-02-15.
  7. ^ "Loonie closes above parity with greenback" (.html), ctv.ca. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  8. ^ Tavia Grant. "China sends loonie flying above $1.10" (.html), The Globe and Mail, 2007-11-07. Retrieved on 2007-11-07. 
  9. ^ Bank of Canada policy on dollar valuation and intervention in FOREX markets
  10. ^ Benchmark currencies of the world
  • Krause, Chester L. and Clifford Mishler (1991). Standard Catalog of World Coins: 1801-1991, 18th ed., Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-150-1. 
  • Pick, Albert (1994). Standard Catalog of World Paper Money: General Issues, Colin R. Bruce II and Neil Shafer (editors), 7th ed., Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-207-9. 
  • Pick, Albert (1990). Standard Catalog of World Paper Money: Specialized Issues, Colin R. Bruce II and Neil Shafer (editors), 6th ed., Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-149-8. 

“ISO” redirects here. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... IMF redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Press (CP) is a Canadian news agency established in 1917 as a vehicle to permit Canadian newspapers of the day to exchange their news and information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CIA redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Globe and Mail is a Canadian English-language nationally distributed newspaper, based in Toronto and printed in six cities across the country. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Standard Catalog of World Coins is a series of numismatic catalogues that is commonly known as the Krause catalogues in the numismatic trade. ... The Standard Catalog of World Paper Money is a very well-known catalogue of banknotes that is published by Krause Publications in three volumes. ... The Standard Catalog of World Paper Money is a very well-known catalogue of banknotes that is published by Krause Publications in three volumes. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian dollar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1214 words)
It valued the Spanish dollar at 5 shillings (the value of the silver in the coin was equal to 4 shillings 6 pence, the "London rating").
The silver Spanish dollars were rated at 5 shillings 1 penny, whilst the British sovereign was rated at 1 pound 4 shillings 4 pence, the proper value due to its gold content compared to that of the gold U.S. dollar.
The Canadian dollar fell considerably after 1960, and this contributed to Prime Minister John Diefenbaker's defeat in the 1963 election.
Canadian coinage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1552 words)
Modern Canadian coins are produced by the Royal Canadian Mint and denominated in Canadian dollars ($) or cents (¢).
The most significant recent developments in Canadian currency were the withdrawal of the $1 and $2 bills in 1987 and 1996, respectively, and their replacement with coins of new design.
Canadian coins are issued by the Royal Canadian Mint and struck at their facilities in Winnipeg.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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